28th Annual Fall Conference on Teaching and Learning (2022)

Wednesday, August 24, 2022
8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
L.V. Eberhard Center, Robert C. Pew Grand Rapids Campus

The Fall Conference kicks off a year-long series dedicated to campus-wide student success conversations and features a keynote presentation by Dr. Tia Brown McNair, Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Student Success at the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). We will engage around the topic of becoming a more-student ready institution. Inspired by the book, Becoming a Student-Ready College: A New Culture of Leadership for Student Success, 2nd Ed., we will shift the conversation from student preparedness for college to one where we address more pragmatic questions of what we are doing to prepare for students entering our institution. We invite you to learn more about Dr. McNair and explore her writings and projects on the AAC&U website.

The keynote presentation (8:30–10:30 a.m.) will be followed by faculty-led breakout sessions and lunch. 


Professional Portrait of Dr. Tia Brown McNair

Dr. Tia Brown McNair

Becoming a Student Ready College: Shifting Mindsets and Challenging Norms

What are promising strategies for designing and leading student success efforts that are guided by the question “What does it mean to be a student-ready college?”  How can educators ensure that all students, especially underserved students, are fully prepared for life, work, and productive global citizenship? What changes need to be made in an institution's policies, practices, partnerships, and culture to make excellence inclusive for ALL students? In this session, participants will identify key steps for examining and for establishing equity goals to promote student engagement and success, and to improve student learning, retention, and completion.

Dr. Tia Brown McNair is the Vice President in the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Student Success and Executive Director for the Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation (TRHT) Campus Centers at the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) in Washington, DC. She oversees both funded projects and AAC&U’s continuing programs on equity, inclusive excellence, high-impact practices, and student success. McNair directs AAC&U’s Summer Institutes on High-Impact Practices and Student Success, and TRHT Campus Centers and serves as the project director for several AAC&U initiatives, including the development of a TRHT-focused campus climate toolkit. She is the lead author of From Equity Talk to Equity Walk: Expanding Practitioner Knowledge for Racial Justice in Higher Education (January 2020) and Becoming a Student-Ready College: A New Culture of Leadership for Student Success (July 2016 and August 2022 Second edition).

Wednesday, August 24, 2022

Time

AGENDA

8 a.m.

Breakfast Available

8:30—9 a.m.

Welcome Remarks

9—10:30 a.m.

Keynote Address by Dr. Tia Brown McNair

10:45—11:30 a.m.

Faculty-led Concurrent Session 1

11:45 a.m.—12:30 p.m.

Faculty-led Concurrent Breakout Session 2

12:30—1:30 p.m.

Lunch Available


2022 Fall Teaching Conference Concurrent Sessions #1 (10:45am-11:30am)

EC 414 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

More than 1,000 journalists have bene killed in the last decade, and 9 out of 10 of those cases remain unsolved, according to Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. But that’s only part of the story.

In the battle for truth, disinformation is one of the greatest threats to democracy. Drawing on social media’s international reach, challengers on reality itself—actions that have serious, even fatal, consequences. The Global Civic Discourse Map seeks to counter disinformation and encourage civil discourse by creating an interactive world map populated by the observations and personal accounts of international journalists.

 

Bringing together faculty from Civil Discourse Multimedia Journalism, Modern Language and Literatures, and Computer Science, this session will explore the project’s origin and the key role FTLC support played in its collaborative approach. All faculty interested in interdisciplinary work are encouraged to attend.

The session will cover four main topics:

  • The origin of the project.
  • The process of adding colleagues from multiple departments to the project.
  • The role FTLC support played in carrying out and editing the interviews with international journalists.
  • Reflections about successes, challenges, lessons learned, and next steps.

Facilitated by:   Jeff Kelly Lowenstein, Communications, Janel Pettes Guikema, Modern Languages and Literatures, and James Ford, Communications

Access the Global Civil Discourse Map Poster

EC 316 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

One important way universities can foster learning and growth across all students is to create structures, policies, and curriculum that support global learning. In this session we will discuss the role of global learning in student-ready institutions and identify ways we can expand global learning at GVSU. We will begin by highlighting the resources and opportunities currently available for faculty and students, and then share ideas for expanding our global learning efforts in and outside of the classroom. Participants will be asked to consider specific applications in their own disciplines and to identify potential barriers to implementing new ideas. Finally, we will identify ways the Faculty Teaching and Learning Center (FTLC), Padnos International Center (PIC), and other university resources can support faculty as they explore and implement global learning initiatives.

Facilitated by: Ellen Shupe, Psychology and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow

Access the Supporting and Expanding Global  Learning at GVSU Handout

Access the Global Learning Definitions and Resources Handout

EC 511 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am 

This Pew FTLC initiative seeks to ground well-being, health, and mental health in existing coursework. 

Grounded in disciplinary expertise, faculty members partner with campus and community experts to bring topics of well-being, health, and mental health to the classroom in Pace Course Modules, embedded into existing courses. In this session participants will get an update on the current state of student mental health, health, and wellness. Participants will learn about ways to engage with the Pace Initiative and see examples of classroom modules designed to bring related expertise from faculty and staff into the curriculum. 

Facilitated by: Patty Stow Bolea, School of Social Work and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow, and Mary Bower Russa, Psychology

Access the Pace Initiative for Student Mental Health Handout

EC 512 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

This interactive session will explore the meaning of flexibility, student engagement, and student centeredness. Participants will share and learn about possible strategies to foster these concepts into their courses and leave with tools they can incorporate now and in the future that help foster student ownership of their learning and in turn, their success. 

Flexibility, student engagement, and student centeredness are common words used in higher education that contribute to student success, but what do they mean to you and are these concepts linked? What are some strategies faculty can integrate into their classrooms and courses that foster these concepts? How can we help students take ownership of their learning while still ensuring mastery of content? Small changes in an online or in-seat classroom can boost student engagement and, in turn, their student success. These changes can move faculty from being the "sage on the stage" to the "guide on the side." This interactive session will help faculty explore these concepts, as well as contribute to possible tools they can incorporate into their classes and energize their teaching and student learning. 

Facilitated by: Susan Strouse, Nursing 

Access the Flexibility and Student Engagement/Centered Teaching Handout

EC 201 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

Resilience is defined as an individual's capacity to navigate to needed resources and the availability of accessible resources in the environment (Ungar, 2008). This session will introduce multi-level models of professional and personal resilience and discussion will focus on how administration and faculty can grow their own capacities for resilience, so we are better able to support our students towards positive outcomes. 

The goals of this session are: 

  • become more familiar with a multi-level model of resilience,
  • share resilience building strategies with each other and,
  • draft an individual resilience implementation plan.

Facilitated by: Gwenden Dueker, Psychology 

Access the Resilient Faculty Can Foster Resilience in Students Handout

EC 410 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

Universal Design for Learning is a course design framework for providing increased access and reducing barriers to learning for all students by offering multiple means of engagement, representation, and action or expression. Engagement strategies are those which help students understand why they are learning in multiple formats. Action or expression strategies provide students with a variety of ways to demonstrate how they understand course content. This session will introduce faculty to the UDL components of engagement, representation, action, and expression. In addition, participants will develop a course design strategy for each UDL component to incorporate in their courses this semester. 

Faculty will work in small groups of 3 or 4 for this session. Three 5-minute video clips which provide an overview of engagement, representation, action, and expression will be viewed during this session. After each video segment, faculty will discuss strategies that would work for their specific courses and/or how they will implement them. 

Facilitated by: Dana Munk, Movement Science and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow 

Access the UDL Principles Handout

Access the UDL Action Expression Handout

Access the UDL Engagement Handout

Access the UDL Representation Handout

 

EC 215 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

The Honors College presents students with the opportunity to engage in a rich and varied General Education program that is tailored to support and to challenge the students in our program. The students are admitted to the Honors College based on a variety of different metrics including GPA, community and high school engagement, life experiences, backgrounds, etc. As such, they are some of the most high-achieving students on our campus. 

This unique population presents faculty with significant opportunities to teach in new ways that challenge and support these students. These challenges result in teaching that often features experimentation, creativity, and unique learning experiences. 

Facilitated by the following Honors College Faculty: Kurt Ellenberger, Jeremiah Cataldo, Ellen Adams, and Joel Stillerman.

EC 310 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

Considering the disruption to our work these past two years, it is more important than ever that we are intentional about the way we spend our finite time and energy. How might we use our values as a springboard to design our work more meaningfully and best serve our students and greater community?

Facilitated by: Kathryn Stieler, Movement Science and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow

EC 423 (Eberhard Center)
10:45am–11:30am

Can meditation make you a better professor? Some in our profession find it helpful for preservation of sanity. It enhances focus and mental clarity, lifts mood, and helps us muster compassion for students, colleagues and ourselves. This session will feature a brief presentation of the research on meditation, a few short, guided meditations which you’ll then be able to practice on your own, and plenty of time for questions and discussion. Longtime practitioners are beseeched to attend and share their wisdom.

Facilitated by: David Eick, Modern Languages and Literatures and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow

Access the Mindful Prof Handout

2022 Fall Teaching Conference Concurrent Sessions #2 (11:45am-12:30pm)

EC 317 (Eberhard Center)
11:45am–12:30pm

Have you ever wondered about or considered teaching adult learners? This session will provide an opportunity to explore what makes adult learning unique, how it might fit with your teaching and scholarship interests and an overview of adult learning programs and opportunities for faculty at GVSU.

The session will begin with a brief overview of the important principles, elements, and definitions relevant to adult education. Participants will the explore their own perceptions, attitudes, and ideas about adult education through an interactive game. The session will finish with an interactive discussion of how faculty can extend their learning and engagement with adult education through FTLC and other GVSU resources.

Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize the primary principles of adult education in regard to the ways in which older students learn and pursue educational goals
  2. Identify sources of motivation and expectations specific to adult learners
  3. Identify opportunities and resources to enhance and/or engage in adult learning and education at GVSU

Facilitated by: Heather Wallace, Public Health and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow

Access the Supporting and Sustaining Adult Learning at GVSU Handout

EC 410 (Eberhard Center)
11:45am–12:30pm

Universal Design for Learning is a course design framework for providing increased access and reducing barriers to learning for all students by offering multiple means of engagement, representation, and action or expression. Engagement strategies are those which help students understand why they are learning in multiple formats. Action or expression strategies provide students with a variety of ways to demonstrate how they understand course content. This session will introduce faculty to the UDL components of engagement, representation, action, and expression. In addition, participants will develop a course design strategy for each UDL component to incorporate in their courses this semester. 

Faculty will work in small groups of 3 or 4 for this session. Three 5-minute video clips which provide an overview of engagement, representation, action, and expression will be viewed during this session. After each video segment, faculty will discuss strategies that would work for their specific courses and/or how they will implement them. 

Facilitated by: Dana Munk, Movement Science and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow 

Access the UDL Principles Handout

Access the UDL Action Expression Handout

Access the UDL Engagement Handout

Access the UDL Representation Handout

EC 201 (Eberhard Center)
11:45am–12:30pm

Resilience is defined as an individual’s capacity to navigate to needed resources AND the availability of accessible resources in the environment (Ungar, 2008). This session will introduce multi-level models of professional and personal resilience and discussion will focus on how administration and faculty can grow their own capacities for resilience, so we are better able to support our students towards positive outcomes.

The goals of this session are:

  1. become more familiar with a multi-level model of resilience,
  2. share resilience building strategies with each other and,
  3. draft an individual resilience implementation plan.

Facilitated by: Gwenden Dueker, Psychology 

Access the Resilient Faculty Can Foster Resilience in Students Handout

EC 512 (Eberhard Center)
11:45am–12:30pm

This interactive session will explore the meaning of flexibility, student engagement, and student centeredness. Participants will share and learn about possible strategies to foster these concepts into their courses and leave with tools they can incorporate now and in the future that help foster student ownership of their learning and in turn, their success. 

Flexibility, student engagement, and student centeredness are common words used in higher education that contribute to student success, but what do they mean to you and are these concepts linked? What are some strategies faculty can integrate into their classrooms and courses that foster these concepts? How can we help students take ownership of their learning while still ensuring mastery of content? Small changes in an online or in-seat classroom can boost student engagement and, in turn, their student success. These changes can move faculty from being the "sage on the stage" to the "guide on the side." This interactive session will help faculty explore these concepts, as well as contribute to possible tools they can incorporate into their classes and energize their teaching and student learning. 

Facilitated by: Susan Strouse, Nursing 

Access the Flexibility and Student Engagement/Centered Teaching Handout

EC 511 (Eberhard Center)
11:45am–12:30pm 

This Pew FTLC initiative seeks to ground well-being, health, and mental health in existing coursework. 

Grounded in disciplinary expertise, faculty members partner with campus and community experts to bring topics of well-being, health, and mental health to the classroom in Pace Course Modules, embedded into existing courses. In this session participants will get an update on the current state of student mental health, health, and wellness. Participants will learn about ways to engage with the Pace Initiative and see examples of classroom modules designed to bring related expertise from faculty and staff into the curriculum. 

Facilitated by: Patty Stow Bolea, School of Social Work and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow, and Mary Bower Russa, Psychology

Access the Pace Initiative for Student Mental Health Handout

EC 423 (Eberhard Center)
11:45am–12:30pm

Can meditation make you a better professor? Some in our profession find it helpful for preservation of sanity. It enhances focus and mental clarity, lifts mood, and helps us muster compassion for students, colleagues and ourselves. This session will feature a brief presentation of the research on meditation, a few short, guided meditations which you’ll then be able to practice on your own, and plenty of time for questions and discussion. Longtime practitioners are beseeched to attend and share their wisdom.

Facilitated by: David Eick, Modern Languages and Literatures and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow

Access the Mindful Prof Handout

EC 310 (Eberhard Center)
11:45am–12:30pm

Considering the disruption to our work these past two years, it is more important than ever that we are intentional about the way we spend our finite time and energy. How might we use our values as a springboard to design our work more meaningfully and best serve our students and greater community?

Facilitated by: Kathryn Stieler, Movement Science and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow


BOOK RAFFLE

The following books are not only wonderful resources, but will also be raffled off during the 2022 Fall Conference on Teaching and Learning and added to the Pew FTLC Library (068 JHZ). To the extent possible, these books will also be made available in eBook form through University Libraries.

Book Title

Author

College Belonging: How First-Year and First-Generation Students Navigate Campus Life (2021)

Lisa M. Nunn

Delivering on the Promise of High-Impact Practices: Research and Models for Achieving Equity, Fidelity, Impact, and Scale (2022)

John Zilvinskis, Jillian Kinzie, Jerry Daday, Ken O'Donnell and Carleen Vande Zande

The New Science of Learning: How to Learn in Harmony With Your Brain (2022)

Todd D. Zakrajsek

From Equity Talk to Equity Walk: Expanding Practitioner Knowledge for Racial Justice in Higher Education (2020)

Tia Brown McNair, Estela Mara Bensimon, Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux and Lynn Pasquerella

The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World in Flux (2022)

Cathy N. Davidson

STEM, STEAM, Make, Dream: Reimagining the Culture of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (2021)

Chris Emdin

Communicate for Change: Revitalizing Conversations for Higher Education (2021)

Lori Carrell and Robert Zemsky

Keeping Us Engaged: Student Perspectives (and Research-Based Strategies) on What Works and Why (2021)

Christine Harrington and 50 College Students

Teaching on Days After: Educating for Equity in the Wake of Injustice (2021)

Alyssa Hadley Dunn

Best Practices in Engaging Online Learners Through Active and Experiential Learning Strategies (2022)

Stephanie Smith Budhai and Ke'Anna Brown Skipwith

Risky Teaching: Harnessing the Power of Uncertainty in Higher Education (2022)

Jay W. Roberts

Designing Intersectional Online Education: Critical Teaching and Learning Practices (2022)

Xeturah M. Woodley and Mary F. Rice

An Evidence-Based Guide to College and University Teaching: Developing the Model Teacher (2021)

Aaron S. Richmond, Guy A. Boysen, Regan A. R. Gurung

Going Public Reconsidered: Engaging With the World Beyond Academe Through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2022)

Nancy L. Chick and Jennifer C. Friberg


Past Conferences on Teaching & Learning



Page last modified August 31, 2022