Current Faculty Learning Communities


Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) bring faculty together to foster a 1-2 semester-long conversation on a topic of mutual interest and encourage an application of the knowledge gained.  Each FLC consists of a facilitator and a group of at least four faculty.  If you are interested in registering for an FLC, simply apply for an Faculty Learning Community in the FTLC Grant System.  All faculty are eligible to apply, unless otherwise noted. (Note: GVSU staff may participate with supervisor approval.)

If you are interested in forming or leading a Faculty Learning Community for the current or upcoming academic year, complete a Faculty Learning Community Letter of Intent Form. If you are leading an FLC, visit the FLC Facilitator Resources page.

Looking for inspiration?  Visit our Past Faculty Learning Communities webpage to see a complete list (with descriptions) of FLCs from past academic years.


2022-2023 FACULTY LEARNING COMMUNITIES

Why join an FLC?--Highlights and interviews with GVSU faculty who have participated in an FLC previously

Download the Transcript

Don't take our word for it.  Watch this short video in which GVSU faculty are interviewed about the impact participating in a Pew FTLC Faculty Learning Community had on them.  We couldn't ask for better ambassadors for this fantastic program!

Looking for which Faculty Learning Communities are meeting right now (in the Winter 2022 semester)? 
Visit our 2021-2022 FLCs webpage.


Cohort-Based

Year-round

This series features topics that are interest to a discipline-specific group of faculty.

  • Fall 2022
  • Fall 2022/Winter 2023
  • Winter 2023
Image to represent a cohort--several stick figures in a group.

Contemplative Pedagogy

Stick figure meditating--representing contemplative actions

Year-round

This ongoing series includes one introduction to contemplative pedagogy for those who are new to the idea and a more advanced topic for those who would like to apply their existing knowledge of contemplative pedagogy.

  • Fall 2022
  • Winter 2023

Effective Teaching: Classic and Contemporary Thought

Fall and Winter

This ongoing series will feature two FLCs each semester, one delving into a foundational text of progressive educational philosophy (e.g. Rousseau, Dewey, Hooks), the other providing a contemporary lens and practical approaches to confront today's pedagogical challenges.  All faculty are welcome to join one or both FLCs.

  • Fall 2021
  • Winter 2023
Stick figure person standing at a podium and pointing to a presentation screen--image represents the act of teaching.

Fostering Belonging in the Classroom and Community

Design with six rings intertwined in a circular pattern--image represents radical inclusion

Fall and Winter

This series is devoted to tpics that build and reinforce diversity, inclusion and equity.

  • Fall 2022
  • Winter 2023

Strong Start

Year-round

  • Fall 2022
Figure crouching on race track starting block

Topic-Based

comment bubble with a star in it--image represents the idea of a topic

Year-round

This series works to gather faculty from a wide variety of disciplines around a single topic of interest

Abolitionist Pedagogy as Inclusive Pedagogy

Winter 2023

How might we address the punitive and carceral structures common in teaching and higher education by considering different abolitionist strategies and pedagogies?

In light of the challenges of teaching in the middle of a global, ongoing pandemic, many academics find ourselves knowing that we need to change- sometimes for our own good and sometimes for the good of our students. In this FLC, we will explore many of the norms of conventional education which is complicit in and maintains systemic racism and settler colonization, which Bettina Love calls the "educational survival complex". To attain and encourage what Love refers to as "educational freedom," this FLC will use Love's book, We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist  Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom, among other resources to explore how to approach educational freedom from an anti-racist , anti-colored lens, emphasizing the lessons that can be learned from abolitionist activism and policy as applied to abolitionist pedagogies. 

Meeting Dates/Times: TBD

Location/Campus: Online/Zoom

Facilitator: Krista Benson, Integrative, Religious and Intercultural Studies, [email protected]

Co-facilitator: Dwayne Tunstall, Philosophy Department, [email protected]

Interested? You can register for this FLC by completing an FLC Application.

 

Becoming a "Slow" Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy

Fall 2022

How might faculty challenge and rethink the culture of "speed" in higher education?

Thanks to a global pandemic, ongoing challenges with enrollment and the role of 21st Century higher education, many faculty are reporting high levels of stress and frustration. One way to respond to the uncertainty on many levels is to become a "slow" professor. Based on principles from the "Slow" movement, a "slow" professor is one who acts with purpose, cultivates intellectual and emotional resilience, and challenges the corporatization of higher education. To learn more about what it means to become a "slow" professor, members of this interactive FLC will read and discuss Berg and Seeber's (2016) book, The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy. Throughout this FLC, we'll consider how we can create "counter-identities" as faculty members, in which we consider how to cultivate more space and time for deliberation, intention, reflection, and open-ended inquiry. 

Meeting Dates/Times: Meeting from 12–1pm on the following Fridays

  • September 16 & 30
  • October 14 & 28
  • November 11
  • December 2

Location/Campus: Online/Zoom

Facilitator: Erica Hamilton, College of Education, [email protected]

Co-facilitator: Dana Munk, Movement Science and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow, [email protected]

Interested? You can register for this FLC by completing an FLC Application.

Becoming a White Antiracist Educator

Spring/Summer 2022

I’m white, and I mean well, but are there things I could do in order to teach in a more racially just manner?

Incorporating the insights of Ibram X. Kendi, Stephen Brookfield’s new book, Becoming a White Antiracist: A Practical Guide for Educators, Leaders, and Activists, promises to be a timely and useful guide to those of us who want to teach in more racially just ways but aren’t sure how. Participants will be invited to read and discuss the book with a view toward applying its precepts in our work with students and colleagues. Meeting location TBD by group consensus. 

Meeting Dates/Times: Meeting 2pm–3pm on the following Tuesdays

  • May 10, 17, 24, & 31
  • June 7 & 14

Location/Campus: Online/Zoom

Facilitator: David Eick, Modern Languages and Literature and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow[email protected]

Interested? You can register for this FLC by completing an FLC Application.

Emotions: Learning the Language that Shapes our Experiences

Spring/Summer 2022

How might we learn more about our emotions so that we are able to better navigate them within ourselves and in our relationships to others?

Do you ever find yourself lost in a sea of emotions, unable to tell them apart or even name them? Do you sometimes struggle to understand and navigate the emotions of students and/or colleagues? When our language for our emotions is clumsy, overly broad, or inaccurate, it can lead us to misunderstand ourselves as well as others. The language we use to describe our emotions shapes our experiences. A better understanding of this language has the power to lead to more meaningful connections, communication, and an improved ability to empathize with others. This FLC will provide space for faculty to explore a full range of human emotions, gain a more specific understanding of emotions that are often confused with each other (i.e. shame and guilt or hope and optimism), and track how emotions play out within themselves and with others. In her book, Atlas of the Heart, Brené Brown offers a guide to the vast landscape of emotions, clearly describing each one, and helping readers to recognize the emotions in themselves. 

Digital Badge: To earn a badge associated with this Faculty Learning Community and for more information about the [email protected] Initiative, visit our [email protected] website.

 

Meeting Dates/Times: TBD

Location/Campus: Majority of meetings will be Online/Zoom

Facilitator: Martina Reinhold, Physician Assistant Studies Department, [email protected]

Interested? You can register for this FLC by completing an FLC Application.

The Great Upheaval

Spring/Summer 2022

Some voices in academia say a tsunami is coming for higher education - should faculty take heed and prepare for it?

In The Great Upheaval: Higher Education's Past, Present, and Uncertain Future, authors Arthur Levine and Scott Van Pelt are the latest to predict disruption for colleges and universities. To cite just one minor example, they tell us that A-F grading is on the way out, to be replaced by more precise and meaningful assessments of students’ competencies. Participants in this FLC will be invited to read the book critically, weigh its arguments, and discuss whether and, if so, how we might need to rethink any of our current approaches to teaching our students. Meeting location TBD by group consensus.

Meeting Dates/Times: 11:30am–12:30pm on the following Fridays

  • May 13, 20, & 27
  • June 3, 10, & 17

Location/Campus: Online/Zoom

Facilitator: David Eick, Modern Languages and Literature and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow[email protected]

Interested? You can register for this FLC by completing an FLC Application.

Ungrading

Spring/Summer 2022

Might there be more constructive and equitable ways in which to give students feedback than assigning letter grades?

In I Love Learning, I Hate School: An Anthropology of College, Susan Blum pointed to grades as a hindrance to the teaching and learning enterprise. Especially since Covid, but even long before that, some instructors have sought more constructive and equitable ways in which to give students feedback. In this FLC, we will weigh the arguments and the evidence for and against abandoning letter grades, to the extent that this is possible, with a view toward helping our students learn more effectively. Participants will be invited to read and discuss Jesse Stommel’s influential articles as well as Susan Blum’s new book Ungrading: Why Rating Students Undermines Learning (and What to Do Instead). Meeting location TBD by group consensus. 

Meeting Dates/Times: Meeting from 1pm–2pm on the following Tuesdays

  • May 10, 17, 24, & 31
  • June 7 & 14

Location/Campus: Online/Zoom

Facilitator: David Eick, Modern Languages and Literature and Pew FTLC Faculty Fellow[email protected]

Interested? You can register for this FLC by completing an FLC Application.


Women in Academia

Fall and Winter

This series is devoted to topics of particular interest to female faculty

  • Fall 2022
Single flame surrounded by a wreath of foliage--image represents education and academia



Page last modified May 9, 2022