Community Exploration

Groundswell's mission is to support place-based education (PBE), and PBE is all about learning through your local community. As part of this, we want to help identify local resources to use as jumping-off points for engaging students in learning. These resources encompass multiple subject areas, including history, ecology, language arts, and more.

We are constantly adding to this list, so please check back often. If you have a specific request, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Watersheds and Nonpoint Source Pollution

Nonpoint source pollution comes from all over the watershed - anywhere rain falls. If you live in the Grand Rapids area, you live in the Lower Grand River Watershed. In our watershed, the top three nonpoint source pollutants we are concerned about are sediment, pathogens, and nutrients.

Do you want to help reduce nonpoint source pollution and keep our water clean? Use the resources on this page to:

  • Explore the environmental needs in your community
  • Identify potential solutions
  • Put those solutions into action

 

Below are some resources that will help as you explore.

 

Clogged Stormwater Drain

Leaves covering storm drain

Ducks / Geese

Geese in park

Hard, Impervious Surfaces

pavement

Pet Waste

Dog in woods

Soil Erosion

Bare soil


Trash and Recycling

What happens to our trash when we throw it away? Where does it go? Do we have enough space to manage all the waste? What happens when trash isn't thrown away properly?

These activities will help you explore how to keep our community litter free and reduce the amount of material sent to the landfill.

Litter, Trash, & Debris

Litter on ground


Local History

The Grand Rapids area has a deep, rich history. Explore these local areas to learn more about the how the city got its start, how it changed over time, and how geography and technology shaped its development.

Oakhill Cemetery

Kendall gravestone in Oakhill Cemetery

Explore Grand Rapids history through this urban cemetery. Learn about our founders, the industries that built our city, and the architectural styles used to honor those laid to rest here.