Exploratory Study Courses

Taking an introductory course in a major can help you decide on a major.  Listed below are several introductory courses.  Read through the list and sign up for one you might be interested in. Taking an introductory course in a major can help you decide on a major.  Listed below are several introductory courses.  Read through the list and register for one you might be interested in.

Exploratory Study Courses

Traces the historical development and examines the scope, theories, discourses, and methodologies defining African American studies and the critical responses to these studies. Surveys perspectives on African American history, religion, social organization, politics, economy, literature, and culture and social ideology. Fulfills Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity.

Credits: 3

The construction and translation of common medical terms.

Credits: 3

Provides students with an introduction to the U.S. health care system and health-related professions they might enter. Content includes how health care is provided in the U.S., organizations involved in providing health care, and an introduction to the various health professions that students may enter as a career. (2-1-0) Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

Introduces the discipline of anthropology by examining the diversity of human cultures that have been described by anthropologists over the last 100 years. The principles of anthropology are explained with examples drawn from nonWestern culture. Comparisons are drawn with our own. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

This course entails investigating contemporary practices of art and design, studying how images and objects acquire meaning, experimenting with basic studio processes, and learning to use digital media in combination with traditional media in making art. Fulfills Foundations - Arts. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

Introduces the disciplines of business law, marketing, management, finance, accounting, and economics; seeks to synthesize them into a general view of business; and briefly explores business careers. Primarily for freshmen interested in business, it is open to all students except upper-division students in the Seidman College of Business. Offered fall semester.

Credits: 3

Computing technology has a profound influence in our society. Students work together to use technology for creative expression, write computer programs to solve problems, use digital tools to make meaning from vast amounts of information and to understand how the Internet supports modern communication. Fulfills Foundations - Mathematical Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: MTH 110.

Credits: 3

This introduction to the study of crime and justice includes theories and methodologies from a variety of social science disciplines. The course also provides an introduction to the study of social control and to the origins of crime at individual, structural, and cultural levels. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

An introduction to concepts and principles that are fundamental to understanding the dynamics and consequences of communication. School of Communications majors must take 101 within the first three semesters of declaring their major. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

An introduction to a variety of communication disorders. A review of the professions speech-language pathology and audiology, an overview of the sciences associated with communication, and an introduction to how various disorders affect communication. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

Students will reflect on their participation in digital cultures and communities to examine the structure and function of digital environments. They will explore how digital platforms inform and are informed by self-understanding, identity performance, community membership, and material experiences. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

Prepares students for encountering East Asia in various ways. Introduces East Asian cultures, political and economic systems, international relationships, recent developments, traditional customs and behavior patterns, differences between regions, and historical roots of some contemporary situations. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Perspectives. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

Designed to acquaint students with teaching and culture of schools through a 25-hour field experience. Students will learn fundamental instructional principles, engage in one-on-one academic support, and write/discuss their experiences. General knowledge of public schools and the foundations of American education will be addressed through readings and discussions. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 2

An introduction to engineering as a career. The major fields of engineering and the typical responsibilities of an engineer are introduced through the use of readings, discussions and presentations. Offered fall semester.

Credits: 1

An introduction to literatures written in English, organized around a theme, period, author, genre, or topic. All sections emphasize close reading, careful writing, and cultural understanding. Besides enhancing these foundational skills, the course will highlight the pleasures and excitements a lifetime of reading offers. Fulfills Foundations - Philosophy and Literature. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

An introduction to interdisciplinary understanding of the multiple ways that human society influences, and is influenced by, its natural environment. The course uses frameworks such as systems thinking and design thinking to integrate scientific, economic, political, and socio-cultural perspectives on topics in environmental and sustainability studies.

Credits: 3

Students will explore the entrepreneurial quest beginning with the myths and realities of entrepreneurs, student self-analysis through creativity and idea generation, and the concept of the business plan. Key motivators and the drivers for success will be analyzed. Students will be required to conceptualize a new venture idea. Offered fall and winter semester.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the study of earth materials and processes, including minerals, rocks, mineral deposits, weathering, erosion, volcanism, and mountain building. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. Fulfills Foundations - Physical Sciences with a lab. (3-0-2) Offered every semester.

Credits: 4

An interdisciplinary introduction to global studies using themes of order/disorder and justice/injustice to explore problems and issues affecting people globally. Focuses on interconnectedness of global concerns and links between the local and global, primarily from a social science perspective. Possible topics: migration, human trafficking, food security, anti-globalization movements, amd infectious disease. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer cartography. We explore various techniques for the analysis, manipulation, and visualization of spatial data. Topics include earth models, datums, map projection, coordinate systems, map types, spatial and statistical data analysis, cartographic generalization/symbolization, data classification, cartographic design, and thematic mapping. Fulfills Foundations - Mathematical Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters. Prerequisite: MTH 110.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the historical and conceptual development of human rights as moral, legal, and cultural constraints on the behavior of states in relation to their citizens. Analysis is theoretical, exploring philosophical arguments surrounding the historical development of human rights and their current role in legal, cultural, literary, and political products. Fulfills Foundations - Philosophy and Literature. Cross-listed with PLS 105. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

Explores the hospitality and tourism industry, including, but not limited to, lodging, food and beverage, and meeting and event planning. This course enables students to explore career options, see parts of the industry firsthand, and understand this dynamic global industry through a community-based learning perspective. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the concept of cultural competence and provides them with the knowledge and application of skills necessary to succeed in diverse settings. This course examines theories of intercultural engagement and then requires students to consider how they might apply knowledge in diverse practical settings. Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity.

Credits: 3

An interdisciplinary introduction to the diversity and complexity of the U.S. Latino/a population, with attention to intraethnic and interracial relations, formation of social identities, and issues of assimilation and cultural conflict. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity. Offered winter semester.

Credits: 3

Can education transform your life and change your world? Explore how liberal education empowers students to question themselves and their society, through critical engagement with classical and contemporary philosophical and literary texts. Discover how liberal education teaches skills that can help you develop your personal, professional, and civic lives. Fulfills Foundations - Philosophy and Literature. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the legal profession, with emphasis on paralegal roles and responsibilities, legal ethics, and major substantive areas of law in the United States including criminal law and substantive civil law areas of agency, business organizations, contracts, real and personal property, torts, wills, and estate administration. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

An entry-level course introducing students to the variety and complexity of the Middle East. Provides a broad view of the region from the perspective of several disciplines and is especially suitable for students having little familiarity with the region. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Perspectives. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

An introduction to principles and practices of cytotechnology, histotechnology, and medical technology and the professionals in these fields as members of the health care team. Restricted to freshmen, sophomores, or transfer students, or by permit.

Credits: 1

Exploration of the past, present, and future of human movement science highlighting professional preparation and opportunities.

Credits: 3

An overview of the natural resources field, exploring how humans use and manage renewable natural resources and the associated ecosystems. Topics will include soils, wetlands, watersheds, fisheries, forestry, wildlife, resource policy and economics, restoration ecology, ecosystem management, and natural resource careers. Required in the NRM major and minor. (0-3-0) Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

An overview of safety and health concepts (accidents, legal accountability, hazard recognition/remediation, countermeasures, and risk) as they apply in a variety of occupational settings. (3-0-0)

Credits: 3

A survey of what is involved in the administration of public and nonprofit entities. How to hire, evaluate, and reward the right people, developing and carrying out public policies, preparing and interpreting budgets, dealing with various pressure groups and governmental agencies, and organizing human resources to carry out the public's business honestly and effectively. Several case studies will be used. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the history, philosophy, current concepts, practice, and administration of public health in the United States. Offered fall semester.

Credits: 3

Inquiry into different perspectives on reality, reason, experience, and human excellence. Intensive reading of at least one classical text and its implications for life in the present. Fulfills Foundations - Philosophy and Literature. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

A prerequisite to all courses listed in the subfield of American Government and Politics. Examines American political values, governmental functions, political processes, policy issues, and decision-making processes. Fulfills Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

This introductory course in international relations (IR) examines interactions among states and non-state actors in the international environment. Class focuses on military, economic, ethnic, and religious conflict. Topics include power, organizations, nationalism, and economic integration. Major IR theories are exemplified by current topics, such as terrorism, poverty, trafficking, and climate change. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

General survey of psychology, the scientific study of behavior and experience, including overt actions and mental activity. Covers how psychologists think and act as scientists and how the study of its subject matter may be integrated at the biological, psychological, and social levels of analysis. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered every academic year.

Credits: 3

An interdisciplinary study of multiple world religions in their cultural, historical, and political context. Students will investigate topics including belief structures, ritual systems, sacred literature, social dimensions, and historical development of various religious traditions. The course will include identification and comparison of key aspects of religion across traditions. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

Introduction to the fundamental questions, concepts, theories, and general principles of sociological thought. Inquiries into culture, socialization, norms, power relations, social institutions, and group interaction. Illustrates how human action transforms society, and how social and cultural forces constrain human action. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered every semester.

Credits: 3

Social work practice, ethics, and values, in the context of social welfare policy in the United States are discussed. Topics in social welfare are examined including social policy, service delivery, research, theory, and practice. Basic social work values and concepts are interpreted. Offered every semester. Note: SW 150 is a prerequisite for all social work courses.

Credits: 3

Examines gender, sex, sexuality, and race as they relate to other categories of difference from an interdisciplinary perspective including disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity. Fulfills one of the Foundations - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters.

Credits: 3

Any course in Historical Perspectives.

  • American Sign Language
  • Arabic
  • Chinese
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Latin
  • Russian
  • Spanish