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Strategic Plan for Brooks College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Context For Planning

Founded in 2004, Brooks College of Interdisciplinary Studies is one of the few colleges of interdisciplinary studies in the nation. With a focus on academic innovation, inclusion and diversity (both domestic and global), community engagement, and high impact liberal education, Brooks College seeks to provide students and community members with skills and knowledge necessary to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

In 2015, at the beginning of the 2016-2021 strategic planning process, Brooks College housed a wide range of interdisciplinary academic programs including African/African American Studies, Chinese Studies, East Asian Studies, Environmental Studies, the Frederik Meijer Honors College, the Intercultural Training Certificate, Latin American/Latino Studies, LGBTQ Studies, Liberal Studies, Middle East Studies, Religious Studies, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, with additional programs such as a Human Rights minor and a major in Global Studies and Social Impact expected to begin in the near future.

In addition to its academic programs, Brooks College also supports students through the Brooks College Office of Integrative Learning and Advising, the Fred Meijer Center for Writing and Michigan Authors, the Frederik Meijer Office of Fellowships, the Padnos International Center, and the Sustainable Agriculture Project. The College engages with West Michigan communities through its Center for Adult and Continuing Studies, the Civil Discourse Initiative, the Community Reading Project, the Kutsche Office of Local History, the Lake Michigan Writing Project, and the Office of Sustainability Practices.

Brooks College began its collaborative, inclusive strategic planning process in January 2015 with the appointment of a representative Strategic Planning Steering Committee. Under the guidance of this committee, in March 2015 the College conducted focus groups of alumni and students and administered an on-line survey of all faculty and staff to ascertain areas of strength, weakness, opportunity, and challenge. Through an iterative visioning process, faculty and staff collectively drafted and then overwhelmingly affirmed new mission, vision, and value statements revised to more accurately reflect the current focus and aspirations of Brooks College. Based on focus group and survey results, the Strategic Planning Steering Committee drafted a document outlining the College’s objectives and strategies and then sought input and feedback through an all-college town hall meeting in fall 2015 and a design-thinking exercise in January 2016.

The resulting 2016-2021 Brooks College of Interdisciplinary Studies Strategic Plan is designed to realized the college’s vision of being a regional and national model for creative inquiry, integrative programming, inclusive practices, and student empowerment.

Mission

Cultivating engaged global citizens through innovative interdisciplinary programs and diverse community partnerships.

Vision

The Brooks College of Interdisciplinary Studies will be a regional and national model for creative inquiry, integrative programming, inclusive practices, and student empowerment.

Value Statement


We Value:

Strategic Priorities, outcomes, and key objectives

Strategic Priority Area 1: Actively engage learners at all levels.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 1.A.1

At least 90% of students graduating in a Brooks College major participate in two or more high-impact learning experiences prior to graduation, in addition to supplemental writing skills and capstone courses.

Baseline

University Baseline: National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) for 2013 showed student participation in high-impact courses at 58%. Within Brooks College, showed student participation in high-impact courses at 73%. That includes 37.8% in Learning Communities; 91.9% in service-learning courses; 32.4% involved in research with faculty; 62% in internships; and 21.6% in study abroad courses.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
This goal was achieved in 2017, details of which were provided in 2018.

2018 Status
Achieved
As reported last year, according to the AAC&U definitions of high-impact learning experiences, all Brooks majors (GSI, LIB, REL, WGS) require at least two high-impact learning experiences. The details of each major's requirements are listed in the attachment. We have continued to make progress on the Semester in Grand Rapids program which is scheduled to launch Spring/Summer 2019. The Brooks College Office of Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development has developed a grant to support community-based learning course development. We have also opened the Interdisciplinary Salon, a new space to promote interdisciplinary dialogue and inquiry within Brooks College and across Grand Valley State University on issues of academic and social importance. In addition, discussions are underway to add an enclosed teaching space at the Sustainable Agriculture Project.

Objective 1.A.2

At least 95% of Brooks College graduate students participate in at least two high-impact learning experiences prior to graduation.

Baseline

University Baseline: 90% excluding the norm of capstone, thesis, dissertation and oral and written exams, baseline levels of participation by graduate students. Summer 2015 Graduate Studies.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
The Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation (PMASI), our first graduate program, launched in the Winter 2019 semester. Two high-impact learning experiences are required to complete the program: an internship and a project with a community organization.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
The inaugural class of the Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation (PMASI), our first graduate program, will begin in the Winter 2019 semester. Two high-impact learning experiences are required to complete the program: an internship and a thesis project with a community organization.

Objective 1.A.3

At least 90% of students graduating in Honors or a Brooks College minor or certificate program participate in one or more high-impact learning experiences prior to graduation, in addition to supplemental writing skills and capstone courses.

Baseline

University Baseline: National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) for 2013 showed student participation in high-impact courses at 58%.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
According to the AAC&U definitions of high-impact learning experiences, all Brooks minors and certificate programs require at least one high-impact learning experience in addition to the capstone. See the attachment for a list of all minors and certificate programs, including their high-impact learning experience requirements.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
According to the AAC&U definitions of high-impact learning experiences, all Brooks minors and certificate programs require at least one high-impact learning experience in addition to the capstone. See the attachment for a list of all minors and certificate programs, including their high-impact learning experience requirements.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 1.B.1

Brooks College graduation rates for full-time students in each Brooks College major or minor and Honors will have increased by a statistically significant amount, and graduation rates of first generation and non-white and Hispanic students will be equal to or greater than that of Brooks College students in general.

Baseline

See Brooks Grad Rates 2017 Doc on L: Drive for baseline information.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2019, the 6-year graduation rate across all majors in Brooks College was 77%, but the 6-year graduation rates for non-white and first-generation students were markedly lower, at 68% each. However, the 4-year graduation rates were remarkably close to one another: 78%, 76%, and 77%, respectively. These data suggest that non-white and first-generation students may be more impacted by extenuating circumstances later in their studies, but additional research is needed to draw definite conclusions. Honors continued to achieve 6-year graduation rates around 90%, and Liberal Studies' 6-year graduation rate was 75%. Neither represents a significant improvement over recent years. In addition, there were 133 students enrolled in Brooks minors in 2019, compared to 111 the previous year, and the 6-year graduation rate for students in most Brooks minors is above 80%.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
In 2018, the graduation rate for Liberal Studies reached an all-time high at 77%. In Honors, the graduation rate was 93.5%. While the University does not track graduation rates for minors, the number of students graduating with a minor increased from 90 students in 2017 to 106 students in 2018. In addition, we have continued to develop retention strategies to support retention. For example, our Office of Integrative Learning and Advising has created a peer mentor program to support students in LIB 100 and LIB 201; these course courses draw a large number of first-year and transfer students. In addition, 19 faculty (51%) attended 36 events related to student retention.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 1.C.1

Brooks College maintains communication with 95% or more of its alumni via print materials, email or social media.

Baseline

In Fall 2016, we had limited college-level engagement with Alumni, except through social media and unit-level contacts. Beginning in Winter 2017 we sent 1674 (100% of Alums at beginning of 2017) Birthday Cards to alums. This number will go down in the future as we narrow the cards to those who have donated, volunteered or connected with Brooks College in the recent year. As of July 2017, we have 202 Facebook followers and 65 Twitter followers. Beginning in Fall 2017, Brooks College Deans Office has begun sending out Alumni Newsletters to over 1600 Alums (100% of alums as noted through Alumni Relations).

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2019, we continued to expand our alumni engagement across our various units. In March, we organized a volunteer outing for faculty, staff, and alumni at the Blandford Nature Center as part of Grand Valley's Community Outreach Week. In March, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies hosted an alumni panel as part of its Anniversary Celebration and Honors hosted an alumni panel as part of its Meijer Endowed Lecture Series. Integrative, Religious, and Intercultural Studies also hosted alumni panel in Fall 2019. On social media, our Brooks College Twitter account gained 68 new followers (53% increase), and our Facebook page gained 42 new likes (18% increase). As of December 2019, our totals are 196 Twitter followers and 273 Facebook page likes. We've also seen an increase in subscribers to our monthly Brooks College newsletter. Our current subscriber list is 242.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
We expanded our alumni engagement both in Honors and in Brooks College. We organized a second volunteer outing with faculty, staff, and alumni at the Kids Food Basket in Spring 2018 and we hosted our second Distinguished Alumni Panel in Fall 2018. Honors reached out to alumni to participate in the 10-year anniversary celebration of the Glenn A. Niemeyer Learning and Living Center in September 2018. Honors is also currently planning for the 2019 Meijer Endowed Lecture Series to feature distinguished alumni. On social media our Brooks College Twitter account gained 38 new followers (42% increase), and our Facebook page gained 16 new likes (7% increase). As of December 2018, our totals are: 128 Twitter followers and 231 Facebook page likes.

Objective 1.C.2

Each Brooks College academic program provides opportunities for a community-based learning experience as a requirement or an elective.

Baseline

In Fall 2016, the following programs all had community-based learning as an elective or requirement: LIB, WGS, LAS, HNR, ENS, HRT, GSI, CHS.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
We continued to develop our initiatives to expand community-based learning. The attachment shows that 16 Brooks College courses across 8 programs include community-based learning experiences, in addition to 6 other community-based learning opportunities in Brooks programs. The inaugural year of Semester in Grand Rapids was a great success, and each student interned with a community organization.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
We continued to develop our initiatives to expand community-based learning: (1) Over 15 Brooks College faculty participated in CBL trainings. (2) The Director of the Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development facilitated 5 training seminars on CBL. (3) The Innovation Lab opened in April 2018. (3) Semester in Grand Rapids, our new CBL "study away" program which requires an internship with a community organization will launch Spring/Summer 2019. Furthermore, the attachment shows that 12 Brooks courses across 4 programs include CBL experiences, in addition to 6 other CBL opportunities in Brooks programs.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 1.D.1

Global learning is a requirement in all Brooks College majors and minors and Honors.

Baseline

100% of majors and minors include required courses that incorporate Global Learning of at least a level 3. Global Learning Survey finalized in Winter 2015 indicates that Area Studies programs range from 3.5-4 overall; LIB at 3 overall; WGS somewhere between 2.5-3 overall. University Baseline: Fall 2014, 63% at level 3 out of 5 levels, with 5 as the highest (immersion) level.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
The new minor in Migration Studies has been dispatched to UCC and is expected to be approved since it contains no new courses. In addition, the AGS department has instituted a weekly lunch-and-learn series called "Global Express" to expand students' exposure to contemporary global issues and enhance connections between GVSU faculty.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
As reported last year, we have already made substantial progress on global learning, and there are no new developments in terms of required courses. The new faculty-led study abroad program to Namibia was a success and is scheduled to continue in 2019. In addition, a new visiting assistant professor of liberal studies and religious studies is collaborating with the Padnos/Sarosik Endowed Professor of Civil Discourse, Elizabeth Arnold, on her anthropology study abroad program in Israel in Summer 2019.

Objective 1.D.2

At least 20% of Brooks College faculty members use state-of-the-art instructional methods and technologies in their teaching.

Baseline

University Baseline: Via a survey conducted in Winter 2016, 89% of faculty indicated either daily or weekly use of Blackboard in their teaching. For Brooks College faculty, this figure is at 97%. University Baseline: Via a survey conducted in Winter 2016, 47% of faculty members use state-of-the-art instructional methods in their teaching. For Brooks College faculty, this figure is at 64%.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
Almost all Brooks faculty use Blackboard in their teaching, and most are highly adept in using technology in pedagogically responsible ways. Honors curricular revisions that were recently approved by UCC include heavy emphasis on problem-based learning, and IRIS has been spearheading two new certificates for degree completion of returning adult learners. Two Brooks faculty members (Adams and Ramos) attended national training on problem-based learning over the summer and have disseminated the information gained to their units (Honors and IRIS, respectively). Online offerings continue to grow, and plans are underway to locate IDeL staff in or near LOH to support instructional design.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2018, 12 faculty (32%) attended 17 training events for online/hybrid teaching. The number of our online classes has again increased, with the total of online and hybrid course sections up to 23% in 2018, compared to 21% in 2017. See the attachment for further statistics of our online and hybrid course offerings. On a curricular level, our faculty members are utilizing innovative instructional methods and technologies. We hired two new faculty whose teaching and scholarship integrates with digital technology, and with the rapid growth of the Digital Studies major (up to 43 minors in Fall 2018, compared to 10 minors in Fall 2017), faculty are enhancing their skills and using technology to meet the needs of students. For example, in LIB/SOC 366 and DS 340, students explore the ways that different indigenous communities are using social media, online communities, and online gaming as a way to share teachings, knowledge, and encourage cultural persistence. In DS 202, Digital Data and Design, students use a variety of tools to design data visualizations, including Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Tableau. The Design Thinking Academy also offers project-based teaching and learning with a "client" who provides the project.

Objective 1.D.3

Brooks College will have at least 7 new interdisciplinary programs or initiatives that support and enhance university-wide collaboration and embody innovations in content, pedagogy, high impact learning opportunities, or technology.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
As reported last year, we achieved this goal. As of 2019, we have launched 9 new programs: Global Studies, Latino/a Studies Certificate, Human Rights, Digital Studies, Intercultural Competence Badge, Semester in Detroit, Semester in Grand Rapids, Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation, and Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENS) major. We are also involved with development of the new Lifelong Educational Access for Diverse Students (LEADS) program which will be housed in IRIS, as well as two of the certifications: Global Communications and Leadership.

2018 Status
Achieved
Since setting the goal, the following new programs are now offered in the College: Global Studies, Latino/a Studies Certificate, Human Rights, Digital Studies, Intercultural Competence Badge, and our Semester in Detroit partnership continues with the University of Michigan. The Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation program will launch in January 2019 and a new Environmental and Sustainability Studies major has been approved by the Board of Trustees to be available in Fall 2019. We are preparing to launch Semester in Grand Rapids, a Design Thinking Badge, Community Action Badge, a Civil Discourse Badge, and a minor in Migration Studies. The certificate in museum studies is no longer under consideration in Brooks College.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 1.E.1

Brooks College, including Honors, will have at least 3 additional externally funded internships, or student research funds.

Baseline

1. In Fall 2016, the Brooks College Study Away fund was created. 2. In Fall 2015, the Dave Feenstra SAP Internship scholarship was created.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
We have no new updates since last year. Our efforts continue to raise funds for the Brooks College Study Away Scholarship and to develop one additionally externally funded scholarship.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
The Dave Feenstra Sustainable Agriculture Fund is now at the level to disperse scholarships. Our efforts continue to raise funds for the Brooks College Study Away Scholarship.

Objective 1.E.2

Brooks College, including Honors, will have at least 2 additional externally funded scholarships.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
As previously reported, this objective was achieved in 2017 with the establishment of the (1) Jeff Chamberlain Meijer Honors College Alumni Endowed Scholarship, (2) the Liberal Studies Accelerated Leadership Program Scholarship; and in 2016, (3) Global Programs Endowed Scholarship and the Study Away Scholarship Fund.

2018 Status
Achieved
This objective was achieved in 2017 with the establishment of the (1) Jeff Chamberlain Meijer Honors College Alumni Endowed Scholarship, (2) the Liberal Studies Accelerated Leadership Program Scholarship; and in 2016, (3) Global Programs Endowed Scholarship and the Study Away Scholarship Fund.

Objective 1.E.3

Support staffing for undergraduate and graduate students is within 20-30% of the best practice staffing levels recommended by accrediting bodies or professional organizations.

Baseline

1 advisor in Honors; 1 advisor in Integrative Learning & Advising; 1 AP, 1/2 AP and 1/8 faculty in the writing center.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantive Progress
Due to budget constraints, we have moved backwards in terms of raw numbers of support staff. However, since the best practice levels have not yet determined, this may be a moot point.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2018, we successfully hired the Director of the Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation program and a new Peace Corps Campus Recruiter in the Padnos International Center. Our 2017 report should be corrected to read that we hired the Director of the Brooks College Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development. The Fred Meijer Writing Center has been developing on-line advising tools to reduce the need for student consultants.

Strategic Priority Area 2: Further develop exceptional personnel.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 2.A.1

50% or more of Brooks College faculty have completed training in developing and implementing high-impact student learning experiences between the years of 2016 to 2021.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
This goal was actually achieved in 2018, since 54% of Brooks faculty completed training in high impact practices in that year alone. The progress continued in 2019, with 11 Brooks faculty completing training on high impact practices such as Reacting to the Past, first-year learning communities, problem-based learning, student research, internships, study abroad, etc.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2018, 20 faculty (54%) attended 43 events related to high-impact learning. Additionally, 5 faculty members participated in a community-based learning workshop series facilitated by the Director of the Brooks College Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development.

Objective 2.A.2

In each Brooks College program at least 60% of credit hours are taught by tenure stream faculty.

Baseline

In Fall 2016, these are the data regarding tenure-line faculty teaching courses across Brooks College programs: ITC Certificate: 34% of courses; 36% of all credit hours LIB: 21% of all courses; 21% of all credit hours REL: 78% of courses; 75% of all credit hours WGS: 82% of courses; 82% of all credit hours AAA: 86% of courses; 82% of all credit hours CHS: n/a EAS: 100% of courses; 100% of all credit hours GSI: 100% of courses; 100% of all credit hours LAS: 100% of courses; 100% of all credit hours MES: 80% of courses; 78% of all credit hours Honors: 87% of courses; 90% of all credit hours ENS: 75% of courses; 56% of all credit hours HRT: 100% of courses; 100% of all credit hours IDS 67% of courses; 60% of all credit hours US: 0% of courses; 0% of all credit hours DS: no courses in Fall 2016; for Fall 2017 100% of courses and 100% of all credit hours staffed with tenure-line faculty TOTAL ACROSS COLLEGE: 62% of credit hours taught by tenure-stream faculty

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
Although this goal was technically achieved in 2018 with 66% total SCH taught by TT faculty, the low percentage of SCH taught by tenure-stream faculty in the Integrative, Religious, and Intercultural Studies (IRIS, formerly Liberal Studies) department prohibits marking it as achieved. As shown in the attachment, these same IRIS programs (LIB, REL, ITC) are still only at 33 -50% of SCH taught by TT faculty in 2019, and the overall percentage for the College has decreased to 58%. IRIS hired one new TT faculty member in W19 (Rutecki), and in F19, IRIS was awarded 2 new TT faculty lines (as well as 3 new AFF lines). While some of these new lines are to support expected growth in the online degree-completion initiatives, they may also help stabilize staffing.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
As seen in the attachment, most of our programs continued to meet this objective in 2018. Similar to last year, the notable exceptions were LIB, where 50.4% of SCH were taught by tenure-stream faculty, REL (53.8% SCH taught by TT), and ITC (53.8% taught by TT). In addition, only 43.7% of IDS courses were taught by TT faculty. In total across Brooks College, 66% of our total credit hours were taught by tenure-stream faculty.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 2.B.1

All Brooks College hiring, personnel, and election processes incorporate best-practices for inclusion and equity.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantive Progress
Much progress has been made on this goal, but there is still much work to be done. In January 2019, the WGS department participated in a workshop on best practices in personnel reviews. In addition, three Brooks faculty participated in a professional development program by the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD) and 14 faculty attended a total of 24 trainings with a DEI and/or mentoring focus. In addition, Honors has begun conversations about increasing faculty/student diversity, and Dr. Malea Powell from MSU is scheduled to run a workshop for Brooks Faculty in April 2020.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
In 2018 we hired two faculty of color and we substantially increased the faculty from underrepresented groups. 14 Brooks faculty attended 22 events on inclusion and equity. Wendy Burn-Ardolino moderated a panel on inclusive hiring practices in Winter 2018. 3 faculty/staff members became Inclusion Advocates in 2018, bringing the total to 18. (In 2018, we lost 5 Inclusion Advocates when Adult & Continuing Studies moved out of Brooks College).

Objective 2.B.2

Annually, Brooks College provides professional development opportunities for all faculty and staff to enhance their intercultural competencies.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
Due to personal conflicts, Dr. Malea Powell delayed her workshop to Winter 2020. However, the AGS department initiated a lunch-and-learn series called "Global Express" that provides opportunities for faculty, staff, and students across the university to learn about contemporary international issues. (Professional development opportunities offered through the Dean's Office in 2019 were aimed at supporting logistical tasks such as scheduling and e-portfolios for personnel reviews.)

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2018, the Dean's Office offered the opportunity for personal career coaching to all faculty and AP staff. At our Winter 2018 Town Hall Meeting, Lisa Perhamus, the inaugural Padnos/Sarosik Endowed Professor of Civil Discourse led a workshop on facilitating difficult dialogues on civil discourse. At our annual PSS lunch event, Relando Thompkins-Jones, the Social Justice Educator/Coordinator, led a workshop on facilitating difficult conversations using storytelling. In addition, we are currently planning a workshop on inclusion and equity in personnel reviews with Malea Powell of Michigan State University.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 2.C.1

At least 70% of tenure-stream Brooks College faculty participate in one or more external professional relationships, excluding mere membership in a professional organization within their discipline.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
This goal was met in 2018, with 86% of Brooks faculty reporting active engagement in their professional organizations. That trend continues: in 2019, 5 faculty reported serving as officers in professional organizations and 8 reported serving on a task force or steering committee. In addition, 13 Brooks faculty members served on a professional editorial review board and 15 reported reviewing papers. Furthermore, 28 faculty gave a total of 66 presentations at academic conferences.

2018 Status
Achieved
Brooks College faculty are highly active in their professional societies. In 2018, 32 (86%) Brooks College faculty members reported giving 60 domestic conference presentations and 14 international conference presentations. In addition, 28 Brooks faculty members (76%) reported extensive engagement with their professions through activities such as: • Peer review of journals or books: 11 faculty members served on 15 editorial or review boards, and an additional 6 faculty members conducted peer reviews, for a total of 31 journal articles and 2 book manuscripts. In addition, 2 faculty members edited individual issues of journals. • Peer evaluation of grants or programs: 2 faculty members served as grant or external program review teams. • Subcommittee work: 16 faculty members served on 25 steering committees or advisory councils within their professional organizations. • Leadership roles: 5 faculty served as officers in professional organizations at the local level and 6 faculty held leadership positions at the national level. In addition, 28 (76%) Brooks faculty members reported extensive engagement with their professions through activities such as: • Peer review of journals or books: 11 faculty members served on 15 editorial or review boards, and an additional 6 faculty members conducted peer reviews, for a total of 31 journal articles and 2 book manuscripts. In addition, 2 faculty members edited individual issues of journals. • Peer evaluation of grants or programs: 2 faculty members served as grant or external program review teams. • Subcommittee work: 16 faculty members served on 25 steering committees or advisory councils within their professional organizations. • Leadership roles: 5 faculty served as officers in professional organizations at the local level and 6 faculty held leadership positions at the national level. We also enhanced our publicizing of faculty successes in annual reports, newsletters, and on social media.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 2.D.1

Each Brooks College academic unit recognizes the contribution to the scholarship of discovery, application, integration, and teaching practice in making personnel decisions.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
As previously reported, standardized rubrics have been developed personnel evaluations. (See attachment). In addition, the attachment includes the CBL taskforce guidelines and best practices for Community Based Learning and Teaching to support quality evaluation of these activities.

2018 Status
Achieved
In addition to the work already reported, we are working on standardizing rubrics for personnel evaluations. (See attachment). The College also developed a grant program to support the development of community-based teaching and learning courses. These grants are available beginning January 7, 2019. See the attachment from the CBL taskforce on guidelines and best practices for Community Based Learning and Teaching to support quality evaluation of these activities.

Objective 2.D.2

Brooks College has awards to recognize achievements of faculty and staff in areas such as innovation, community engagement, interdisciplinarity and student-centeredness.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantive Progress
Although we do not have specific awards for the areas listed in the objective, we continued to recognize the achievements of our faculty and staff through our newsletter and social media channels. Our 2019 Book Launch Celebration was a great success, and we are planning a combined Faculty Scholarship Showcase for February 2020 to celebrate sabbatical research and publications.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
We continued to celebrate sabbatical achievement through our annual sabbatical showcase. These achievements are recognized through our annual report, newsletter, and social media. In addition to our sabbatical showcase, we are planning a book publication party for February 2019.

Objective 2.D.3

Brooks College has one or more annual series of regularly occurring events that promote dialogue among Brooks College faculty and staff and with other GVSU faculty and staff around interdisciplinary scholarly and creative projects.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
The funding of Interdisciplinary Salon proposals has been discontinued due to budget constraints. However, the AGS department has initiated a weekly lunch-and-learn series called "Global Express" that has engaged faculty across the university. This is a welcome addition to existing events such as the Sustainability Luncheon and other departmental efforts discussed in previous years.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
Individual units continued with events such as the Working Lunch Series, and other events mentioned in the 2017 report. In 2018, the College launched the Interdisciplinary Salon to promote interdisciplinary dialogue and inquiry within Brooks College and across Grand Valley State University on issues of academic and social importance. Funding has been set aside for interdisciplinary events with proposals reviewed by a committee of faculty.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 2.E.1

Each year, at least 75% of Brooks College faculty and 75% of Brooks College staff participate in professional development to expand, enhance or extend their competencies and capabilities within the context of the responsibilities of their positions.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
Faculty continue to report professional development, but we still need to develop a system for tracking staff participation. In 2019, a total of 30 full-time faculty reported attending one or more conferences, workshops, or online courses specifically for the purpose of developing their competencies/capabilities. (This is in addition to normal attendance at academic conferences.)

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2018, 30 Brooks faculty members (81%) attended 123 workshops at GVSU, 27 domestic workshops, 7 online trainings, and 6 international workshops. Numbers for staff have still not been collected. The College held workshops on mentoring and appreciative advising, a town hall workshop on difficult conversations around race, and a PSS professional development lunch also on Difficult Conversations around Race. The Brooks College Director of the Office of Integrative Learning and Advising attended the AAC&U 2018 annual meeting and a summer institute on appreciative advising. The Brooks College Director of the Office for Community Partnerships attended the AAC&U 2018 annual meeting. AP staff from the Padnos International Center regularly attend annual meetings of AIEA and NAFSA. The Directors of the Writing Center regularly attend annual meetings of the Michigan Writing Centers Association and the International Writing Centers Association. The Honors College staff and advisors attended the 2018 annual meeting of the National Collegiate Honors Council along with the Honors College Director and Chair. The Director of the Office of Sustainability Practices attended the AASHE Leadership Development Workshop in July 2018 at Wilfred Laurier University.

Objective 2.E.2

The extent to which Brooks College faculty members' performance promotes excellence in teaching, learning, and scholarship is used to assign and evaluate workloads consistent with university practice and criteria.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2019, Brooks College unit heads refined the previous college document on use of LIFT reports and most Brooks unit heads attended the associated university training. In addition, the Brooks College Faculty Council initiated conversations about equitable service loads; these conversations were supported by the Dean's Office through gathering historical data.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
Each unit has now developed rubrics for consistent and fair evaluation and the college is coordinating these rubrics for consistency. (See attachment). We are planning a talk for January 2019 with AVP Aboufadel and AVP Pluff to facilitate a workshop with Liberal Studies and Area and Global Studies around personnel reviews in the department. We also implemented WGS rubrics for the evaluations of FARs. All units have implemented a system for equitably allocating service responsibilities to faculty FAP process for Fall 2018. In addition, we developed practices for the fair and effective use of results from student evaluation of faculty teaching.

Strategic Priority Area 3: Ensure the alignment of institutional structures and functions.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 3.B.1

Brooks College has structures in place to evaluate and improve the equity and inclusiveness of its policies, procedures, and practices.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
One Brooks unit had a meeting devoted to fair assessments of personnel dossiers in January 2019, but the workshop on inclusion and diversity in personnel reviews with Malea Powell was delayed and is now scheduled for April 2020. Selected College documents have been reviewed and modified in 2019 with an eye towards equity and inclusion.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
In 2018, the Dean’s Office was advised that a student advisory council is not realistic and may be discriminatory against part-time students, therefore the College seeks to enhance communication with the structures of the student senate. In Winter 2018, the College held a town hall meeting on supporting difficult conversations. We also hosted an Appreciative Advising Workshop and we are planning a workshop on inclusion and diversity in personnel reviews with Malea Powell of Michigan State University. Additionally, the Faculty Council held a session where faculty to identify issues and concerns. Systematizing and coordination service assignments in the departments and written performance evaluations rubrics across the college are measures taken to meet this objective. The also provided career coaching and external mentorship opportunities to faculty and staff.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 3.C.1

90% of Brooks College faculty and 75% of Brooks College students (majors, minors, and certificate students) report their civic engagement activities and community partnership in the university-wide data base.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantive Progress
As previously reported, GVSU still does not have a University-wide database. However, our Brooks College Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development has continued to be very active in this area. The director has continued cultivating partnerships and community engagement opportunities throughout West Michigan which included 7 internship placements for the first Semester in Grand Rapids cohort. Also, in 2019, 26 Brooks faculty members reported public service and/or civic engagement activities on their FARs. As discussed in our last report, our community-based learning guidelines were included in last year's attachment.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
GVSU still does not have a University-wide database, however, our Brooks College Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development has been very active in this area throughout 2018. The new director conducted a survey of all faculty regarding their civic engagement activities and community partnerships. The survey results are included in the attachment. In addition, the director has been cultivating partnerships and community engagement opportunities throughout West Michigan. Also, in 2018, 26 Brooks faculty members (70%) reported public service and/or civic engagement activities on their FARs. In addition, we created a grant program to support the development of community-based teaching and learning courses. These grants will be available beginning January 7, 2019. The CBL grant information and the CBL task force guidelines are also included in the attachment.

Objective 3.C.2

By 2021 Brooks College has developed 3 additional long-term reciprocal community relationships.

Baseline

Through the Office of Sustainability Brooks College has partnerships with the City of GR and Seeds of Promise. The Kutsche Office of Local History has a partnership with the Holland Herrick Library.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
Since setting this goal, Brooks College has developed 10+ long-term reciprocal community partnerships. Beyond the partnerships listed in previous reports, the Kutsche Office of Local History Grand Rapids African American Museum and Archive and the Lowell Area Historical Museum for the event, "“The World’s Greatest Minstrel Show Under the Stars: Blackface Minstrels, Community Identity, and the Lowell Showboat, 1932-1977." The Kutsche Office is also partnering with the Great Michigan Read and the Grand Rapids Public Library to host a series of events in March 2020 around the book, "What the Eyes Don't See." The inaugural year of the Semester in Grand Rapids program included internship placements for 7 students at the following community organizations: Cook Arts Center, Dwelling Place, Home Services Repair, Mary Free Bed YMCA, Other Way Ministries, and the West Michigan Center for Arts and Technology. Marilyn Preston, assistant professor of integrative studies, facilitated a five-session training on diversity and inclusion for the leadership and staff of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. All of these relationships are expected to continue.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2018, the Kutsche Office of Local History established new partnerships with the Saugatuck Douglas History Center and Saugatuck High School for two projects. In addition, the Kutsche Office established 9 new partnerships with local history organizations for their Connections Along the Grand River project. Marilyn Preston, Assistant Professor of Liberal Studies, established a partnership with B’nai Israel Synagogue in Muskegon, Michigan to collect the oral histories from members of the B’nai Israel congregation. The Civil Discourse Initiative also established a partnership with the Center for Civil Discourse at the WMU-Cooley Law School.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 3.D.1

At least 30% of Brooks College undergraduate courses are offered in innovative approaches and formats, such as hybrid, online and competency-oriented.

Baseline

As of 2016, 27 courses in Environmental Studies, Liberal Studies, Religious Studies, Area & Global Studies, Human Rights, Honors, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies are offered online.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
Brooks College continues to expand the curriculum in innovative ways. There have been steady increases in online/hybrid sections, which are now up to 25% across all offerings. Much of this growth has been in summer offerings to serve students who live outside of the local region; summer online offerings in Brooks departments now outnumber seated sections. In addition, the IRIS department is leading two new online degree completion programs for returning adult learners. The work began in F19 and will continue through W20 & S20, in preparation for the new programs to be launched in F20.

2018 Status
Achieved
We continued to expand our online/hybrid course offerings in 2018. The attachment shows that 131 course sections (23%) were offered online/hybrid and 61 courses (27%) were offered online/hybrid. In addition, 12 faculty members (32%) attended 17 training events on online/hybrid teaching. As noted elsewhere in our report, our faculty members are utilizing innovative instructional methods and technologies. We hired two new faculty whose teaching and scholarship integrates with digital technology, and with the rapid growth of the Digital Studies major (up to 43 minors in Fall 2018, compared to 10 minors in Fall 2017), faculty are enhancing their skills and using technology to meet the needs of students. For example, in LIB/SOC 366 and DS 340, students explore the ways that different indigenous communities are using social media, online communities, and online gaming as a way to share teachings, knowledge, and encourage cultural persistence. In DS 202, Digital Data and Design, students use a variety of tools to design data visualizations, including Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Tableau. The Design Thinking Academy also offers project-based teaching and learning with a "client" who provides the project.

Objective 3.D.2

At least 30% of Brooks College graduate courses are offered in innovative approaches such as, hybrid, online, and competency-oriented.

Baseline

0 graduate courses, so 0 in hybrid or online format.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
Currently, Brooks College has one graduate program, the Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation (PMASI). In the PMASI program, 5 (62%) of the 8 Brooks College graduate courses are offered in a hybrid format.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
Our first graduate program, Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation (PMASI), will launch in Winter 2019. All Social Innovation classes are planned to be offered in a hybrid format for Fall 2019.

Objective 3.D.3

At least 30% of Brooks College programs work with the institution's art gallery in programming or creative/scholarly activity. The university's baseline is 15% of undergraduate majors integrate the collection into their curriculum and use in instructional activities.

Baseline

As of summer 2017, 37% of Brooks College programs work with the institution's art gallery in programming or creative/scholarly activity. If only academic programs are considered (majors and minors), 31% of programs integrate the institution's art gallery or collections into programming.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
As reported previously, no efforts have been made to further assess the use of the art collection or to encourage its use. However, the initial assessment of this objective stated that the goal had been achieved.

2018 Status
Achieved
As reported last year, no efforts have been made to further assess the use of the art collection or to encourage its use. However, the initial assessment of this objective stated that the goal had been achieved.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 3.E.1

Brooks College has processes that promote transparent and equitable allocations of resources.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
For the past three years, we have continued with the same practices as reported in 2016. There are no further updates on this objective at this time.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
We have continued with the same practices as reported in 2016. In addition, the Dean's Office met individually with members of the Leadership Council in Summer 2018 to collaboratively identify budget cuts.

Objective 3.E.2

Brooks College has developed at least one innovative program that brings revenue to the college.

Baseline

In 2015 there were no programs that generated revenue for the College.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantive Progress
In 2019, the ITC badge was introduced; this badge will replace the existing ITC certificate beginning Fall 2020. In addition, in Fall 2019, the IRIS department worked to create two new online certificate programs to serve returning adult learners. Both of these programs are expected to bring significant new revenue to the university (though not necessarily directly to Brooks College).

2018 Status
Minimal Progress
Nothing to report.

Objective 3.E.3

Brooks College has a dedicated staff person to support project-based and community-engaged teaching and scholarly and creative activity in any College academic program.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
As previously reported, this objective was achieved in 2017 with the appointment of the Director of the Brooks College Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development.

2018 Status
Achieved
This objective was achieved in 2017 with the appointment of the new Director of the Brooks College Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development.

Strategic Priority Area 4: Enhance the institution's image and reputation.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 4.A.1

30% of Brooks College programs have received external recognition (feature story, article, etc.).

Baseline

As we want to see 30% of the programs receiving external recognition over 5 years, we are starting at a baseline of 0.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
We have continued our efforts to promote our programs externally. Since setting this goal in 2015, 8 programs (32%) have received external recognition. The programs and various external recognitions are included in the attachment. In addition, the Office of Sustainability Practices was recognized when Grand Valley was named a green college by Princeton Review for 2019 for the tenth year in a row. In 2019, 9 programs were also featured on the WGVU Morning Show with Shelley Irwin.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
With the support of the new Office Coordinator in the Dean's Office, we continued our efforts to promote our programs externally. The Office of Sustainability Practices again received numerous national recognition: -The Sustainable Agriculture Project received national recognition by winning the 2018 Innovative Project Award by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. -For the ninth year in a row, Grand Valley was again named a green college by Princeton Review for 2018 -GVSU was the highest ranked 'Cool School' in Michigan by the Sierra Club in 2018 -The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) 2018 Sustainable Campus Index ranked GVSU as a top performer ranking 4th for waste minimization and 10th for wellness -Grand Valley State was named one of the country's greenest schools for the fourth year in a row by the Sierra Club. -For the sixth year in a row, GVSU was named one of the country's most environmentally responsible colleges by The Princeton Review in their 2018 "Guide to 353 Green College". The Kutsche Office of Local History was featured in a Holland Sentinel article for their "Stories of Summer" project, and in an article from the Lansing news station, WILX, for their involvement in the Third Coast Conversation: Dialogues About Water In Michigan grant. The Accelerated Leadership Program was featured in an article on WeAreGR.com about their Laker Effect Challenge award to support a uniform swap at Harrison Park elementary and middle schools. In addition, the honors college course, "Saging and Aging," was featured in a video segment on WOOD TV 8. The directors of the Honors College, the Professional Master of Arts in Social Innovation, the Brooks College Office for Community Partnerships and Student Professional Development, the Design Thinking Academy, and the Coordinator of the Accelerated Leadership Program all gave radio interviews promoting their programs.

Objective 4.A.2

The number of Brooks College students who have received external awards or recognitions has increased by at least 25% over the number of recognitions in 2015 (grant, publication, conference presentation, external fellowships, etc.).

Baseline

In 2015, 18 students and 1 alumnus had external recognition.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
In 2019, a total of 31 Brooks College students (a 72% increase from 2015) received external awards or recognitions. 24 Brooks College students received external fellowships, grants, or scholarships. Ben Scott-Brandt, IRIS, received the Grand Rapids Area Higher Education Network's (GRAHEN) Outstanding Adult Learner Award. A team of 4 Design Thinking Academy students led two workshops for business leaders at Michigan SBDC's conference in Traverse City. Emily Zeliasko and Kayleigh Thomas, Honors, gave an interactive presentation at the IUPUI National Mentoring Symposium in Indianapolis.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
In 2017-2018, 34 Brooks College students received external fellowships. However, as previously reported this information is difficult to separate by calendar year. We still do not have a system to effectively track students who made professional presentations or publications. However, we hear anecdotally on a regular basis about Brooks College students who are presenting their work at external conferences.

Objective 4.A.3

The number of Brooks College faculty and staff who have received external awards or recognitions has increased by at least 25% over the number of recognitions in 2015 (grant, publications, conference presentations, external fellowships, etc.).

Baseline

In 2015, 27 faculty and staff were externally recognized.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
in 2109, 5 Brooks faculty members received a total of 8 external grants and 4 faculty published books. In addition, 18 faculty published a total of 29 journal articles, 14 faculty published a total of 24 book chapters, and 28 faculty gave a total of 66 presentations at academic conferences and 32 presentations at other universities.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2018, 6 Brooks College faculty members were Pl or co-Pl on 8 external grants and 4 faculty/staff received external awards. 26 Brooks faculty members made a total of 63 intellectual contributions in 2018, including 3 published books. 15 faculty members published a total of 20 peer reviewed journal articles and 6 book chapters. 17 faculty members made a total of 39 other intellectual contributions, such as book reviews, newspaper or magazine articles, media contributions, blogs or other open access materials. 32 Brooks College faculty members (86%) reported giving 60 domestic conference presentations and 14 international conference presentations. 11 faculty members served on 15 editorial or review boards, and an additional 6 faculty members conducted peer reviews, for a total of 31 journal articles and 2 book manuscripts. In addition, 2 faculty members edited individual issues of journals.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 4.B.1

50% of the College's programs have received recognition for promoting inclusion and diversity.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantive Progress
Due to transition in the leadership of Brooks College in 2019, the proposed "next steps" in 2018 (defining what recognition means and creating a database for tracking recognition) have yet to occur. However, it is noteworthy that the IRIS department began work in 2019 to expand their degree completion program to a state-wide effort intended to reach returning adult learners across the state; that program is slated to begin in Fall 2020. Previous DEI efforts are also continuing and expanding, All Brooks units are engaged in DEI work; DEI efforts are at the core of most programs in Brooks College, and even Honors has begun discussions about diversifying their program.

2018 Status
Minimal Progress
As reported last year, we are still collecting data on this objective. The Kutsche Office of Local History's Stories of Summer project, which is a collaboration with the Saugatuck-Douglas History Center to record local LGBTQ stories, has received recognition internally and externally, including outlets such as the Holland Sentinel. In addition, the Kutsche Office's Annual Local History Roundtable, Lunch with the Kutsche Office event, and Engaging the Community Series, facilitated their continued connections with the community. A team of Accelerated Leadership Program students received a Laker Effect Challenge award to support a uniform swap at Harrison Park elementary and middle schools, which was featured in a GVNow story and on WeAreGR.com.

Objective 4.B.2

20% of Brooks College faculty and staff have received recognition for promoting inclusion and diversity.

Baseline

Two faculty have received the award for including diversity and inclusion in their teaching.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
Since there are less than 50 full-time faculty members in Brooks College, this objective was achieved in 2018 with 10 faculty members being recognized for promoting inclusion and diversity. In addition, the vast majority of Brooks faculty address one or more aspects of this topic on their annual faculty activity reports.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
As previously reported, Wendy Burns-Ardolino (LIB) was an Inclusion and Equity Faculty Associate in 2018. In addition, Cáel Keegan (WGS/LIB) received the Prism Award from the LGBT Faculty and Staff Association at GVSU. Lois Smith Owens, program coordinator for the Intercultural Training Certificate, was awarded the Doris Rucks Trailblazer Award from the Positive Black Women, a campus organization that aims to provide support for women of color at GVSU through building relationships, professional development, and a collaborative effort toward community enrichment. This brings the total of Brooks College faculty and staff who have received recognition for promoting inclusion and diversity to 10. In addition, Lisa Perhamus, the Director of the Padnos/Sarosik Civil Discourse Program received the 2018-19 Pew Teaching Excellence Award for Inclusion and Diversity.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 4.C.1

The number of Brooks College external partnerships or relationships that receive positive notice in the external media has increased by 100%.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
Since setting this goal in 2015, 7 community partnerships have received recognition in external media, which includes the partnerships previously reported. (See attachment.) In 2019, the Grand Rapids Business Journal featured a story on the inaugural year of Semester in Grand Rapids which included 7 community partners. Marilyn Preston, IRIS, led two inclusion and diversity trainings at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland which were recognized in our newsletter and on social media. In Spring 2020, the Kutsche Office will be partnering with the Great Michigan Read and the Grand Rapids Public Library to host a series of events around the book, "What the Eyes Don't See," which may gain attention from local media outlets. Additionally, in Spring 2020, the Padnos/Sarosik Civil Discourse Program is planning to start a Twitter account to increase the exposure of its programs and events.

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
Our efforts are ongoing to better publicize our community partnerships and relationships in the external media. In 2018, the Kutsche Office of Local History's involvement in the Third Coast Conversation: Dialogues About Water In Michigan grants received attention in Lansing's news station WILX. In addition, Jane Toot's honors course, "Saging and Aging," which partnered with Brookcrest Rehab & Life Center in Grandville, was featured in a video segment on WOOD TV 8. A team of ALP students who developed a uniform swap program for Harrison Park Elementary School was included in an article on WeAreGR.com In 2019, our Semester in Grand Rapids program, which includes a number of community partnerships, has the potential to resonate with the local media. In addition, we hired a new Office Coordinator in the Dean's Office in 2018 to increase our visibility on online and on social media to help publicize our programs and community partnerships.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 4.D.1

Brooks College employs new technologies in implementing its comprehensive communication and marketing plan to enhance effectiveness and efficiency.

Progress

2019 Status
Substantial Progress
In 2019, the Office Coordinator created a Communications Survey to gauge the effectiveness of our communications among faculty and staff, which affirmed our current strategies. (Results attached.) We continued to refine our website and newsletter to make our content, events, and resources more user-friendly and engaging. Our social media and newsletter audience continued to increase this year. On social media our Brooks College Twitter account gained 38 new followers (42% increase), and our Facebook page gained 16 new likes (7% increase) in 2019. As of December 2019, our totals are: 128 Twitter followers and 231 Facebook page likes. We added two easy ways for new subscribers to join our mailing list which has let to an increased readership for our monthly Brooks College newsletter. Our current subscriber list is 242, up from 231 in 2018.

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
As reported elsewhere, in July 2018 we hired an Office Coordinator in the Brooks College Dean's Office to support our communication and marketing efforts. In 2018, our Twitter account gained 38 new followers (42% increase), and our Facebook page gained 16 new likes (7% increase). As of December 2018, our totals are 128 Twitter followers and 231 Facebook page likes. We have also made significant improvements to the Brooks College website including reorganization of navigation to make the web pages more user-friendly, adding new and optimized images, updating the homepage with current news and events, utilizing the banner space to add visual interest and to promote events and programs, and updating the faculty resources page. We also developed a College-wide calendar to better organize and plan our internal events.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 4.E.1

Brooks College has a dedicated staff position for communication, marketing, and external relations.

Progress

2019 Status
Achieved
As previously reported, this objective was achieved in 2018 with the hire of Office Coordinator in the Brooks College Dean's Office. In 2019, the Office Coordinator continued to refine the Brooks College website, social media campaigns, and newsletter design, while also assisting departments with promoting special projects, events, and website updates.

2018 Status
Achieved
In July 2018, we hired a new Office Coordinator in the Dean's Office to support our communication and marketing efforts. As reported elsewhere, the Office Coordinator has made significant updates to the website, and has implemented a social media plan to build awareness of Brooks College both internally and externally.

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