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Strategic Plan for Office of the Provost - AVP of Student Success

Mission

This Division encourages and supports students toward achievement of their educational goals.

Vision

Grand Valley State University demonstrates its commitment to providing an inclusive learning environment where all students can explore new directions, find their niches, and develop skills for life and for productive careers. Grand Valley is known for innovative and outstanding support for all students. Grand Valley inspires and equips students to be active lifelong learners and global citizens through significant community engagement opportunities throughout the curriculum.

Value Statement

At Grand Valley State University, the primary focus of administration, faculty, and staff is on the success of students. The Division of Academic and Student Affairs has adopted the following values, which reflect the focus on students, and are also the values of this Division: We value excellence in teaching and learning in all undergraduate and graduate programs. We believe the principles and practices of a liberal education provide a sound foundation for the institutions academic programs. We are committed to a student-centered, rigorous learning environment that integrates disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and co-curricular programs. We value the use of high impact educational practices that demonstrate the relevance of liberal education and prepare students with essential skills for their lives after graduation. We believe ethically-grounded scholarship in all of its forms contributes to the development and application of knowledge, creates a dynamic environment for learning, and enriches the world and the lives of its citizens. We believe that innovation in teaching, learning and scholarship produces meaningful educational experiences and is critical to the growth and development of the University. We value internal and external service that enriches the intellectual culture of the University and its communities. We value and invest in economic, social, environmental and cultural initiatives and collaborations that have the potential to benefit our institution, our region and state, our nation, and the world. We believe that a diverse faculty, staff and student body; inclusive programming and curricula; and a welcoming, respectful, and accessible environment are fundamental components of a quality educational experience and vibrant campus community. We believe collaborative leadership through shared governance is central to the success of the University. We believe in responsive leadership, with clarity and transparency in processes and communication. We believe that strategic planning and purposeful assessment and evaluation of programs and processes are essential to the University's viability.

Strategic Priorities, outcomes, and key objectives

Strategic Priority Area 1: Actively engage learners at all levels.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 1.A.1

Student Success initiatives will increase FTIAC retention to 87% by 2021.

Baseline

The FTIAC retention rate for the 2016 cohort was 82.9%.

Progress

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
Several student success initiatives are being put into place or have been put into place this academic year, that should have an impact. We are modifying our linked courses initiative during the 2018-2019 academic year, we are piloting a faculty-led mentoring program during the same academic year, and we are piloting an academic forgiveness program for undergraduates during this academic year as well. We expect these new initiatives to have a positive impact on retention that we will see for the 2018 cohort, and which will have even more effect on the 2019 cohort since that will be the first class for whom these programs will be fully in place.

2017 Status
Substantial Progress
SASC will implement student success and retention programs and track retention rates for the Academic Coaching Program, Oliver Wilson Freshman Academy Program, TRIO Student Support Services Program, and TRIO Student Support Services STEM programs.

Objective 1.A.2

Community Based Learning (CBL) courses will be available across the curriculum from Freshmen to Senior level courses.

Baseline

Discussion and preparation to get buy in across campus for CBL classes took approximately 4 and a half years. THE CBL designation and process for receiving the designation was officially implemented Fall 2018 and 3 classes were approved.

Progress

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
The first 3 courses have been officially approved for CBL designation in Spring 2018. More courses are up for CBL designation approval in Fall 2018 semester.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 1.B.1

Student Success initiatives will increase the retention rate among underrepresented students.

Baseline

According to Institutional Analysis, retention rates from Fall 2016 to Fall 2017 for First Generation students was 80%, and for all other students was 84.4 % for the same time frame. For underrepresented student populations retention for the same time frame varied from 74.0% for African American students, to 75.8% for Hispanic students, to 82.2% for Asian students, as compared to 84.2% for white students. According to the Institutional Analysis report, for the 2010 cohort, 52.2% of the students in underrepresented populations had graduated in 6 years (spring 2016), as compared to 68.2% of students not from underrepresented populations. For the same cohort, 61.5% of First Generation students graduated in 6 years, and 69.8 % of the students who were not First Generation students graduated in the same time frame.

Progress

2017 Status
Substantive Progress
A modest increase in first year retention rate was reported for the 2017 cohort, at 84.5% (2016 cohort retention rate was 82.9).

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
The TRIO SSS Programs both STEM and Traditional serve low income and first generation college students. These program have demonstrated a much higher retention rate than the general student population.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 1.E.1

100% of first year students will have the opportunity to engage in student success initiatives which utilize the talents of faculty and staff by 2020.

Baseline

For 2017-2018 the primary mentoring opportunities students could participate in were Laker Familia (121 students), Niara (107 students), and Black Excellence, which had membership of 50 students. These student groups were primarily upper classmen. Many of the mentors are staff.

Progress

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
Mentoring options are varied and extensive, including some for affinity groups, some through academic divisions (Liberal Studies, Women in Science, and others), and this new mentoring program which will be open to all freshmen will achieve the goal. Several mentoring groups have been added to the Student Success Network i F 2018 for students who were identified through our early intervention survey, as students who could benefit from a mentor. The plans are still to offer this option to all first year students next fall, 2019.

Strategic Priority Area 2: Further develop exceptional personnel.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 2.B.1

Professional staff will attend at least 2 professional development activities pertinent to their current role each year. These can include workshops, conferences, certifications, training, or other opportunities, and can be internal to GVSU, regional, or national activities.

Baseline

All professional staff are active with regard to professional development. In 2017 the PSS (support) staff participated in a range of 4 to 6 professional development programming, offered both here at GVSU and external to the university. The advisors and directors participated in a range of 1-3 professional development opportunities, primarily external to GVSU.

Progress

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
Travus Burton, the Director of Community Engagement, attended the National Campus Compact Annual conference in Indianapolis, IN during March, 2018 - a 3-day conference bringing together students, staff, faculty and university community partners from around the country for educational presentations and networking opportunities. Travus also attended the Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement National Conference in Anaheim, CA in June, 2018 where the conference focus was more centered around civic learning and democratic engagement rather than just campus to community engagement.

2016 Status
Achieved
Departmental staff involvement in state and national organizations, committees, and task forces. • Ariel Arnold (Program Advisor, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o COE Conference o MI-ACPA Conference (Presenter) o MICAPP Conference • Damon Arnold (Dir. LAKER Center / Special Assoc. to the Athletic Director) o NCAA Standing Committee o N4A Standing Committee o United Way Advisory Committee • Nykia Gaines (Director – TRIO SSS STEM/Health Sciences) o COE Legs and Regs Training • Care McLean (Program Coordinator, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o MI-ACPA Conference (Presenter) • Michael Messner (Assistant Vice Provost for Student Success) o ACPA Conference o MIACADA Conference o State Student Success Conference • Marnie Parris-Bingle (Program Advisor, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o MAEOPP Conference o MICAPP Scholarship Committee o State Foster Youth Committee • Gabriel Pena (Academic Advisor) o MIACADA Conference (Presenter) o State Student Success Conference • Linda Rettig (Program Advisor, TRIO SSS STEM/Health Sciences o NCORE Conference o State Student Success Conference • Alexis Schewe (Senior Academic Advisor) o MiACADA Conference • Sulari White (Senior Associate Director) o MiACADA Conference o State Student Success Conference • MarcQus Wright (Director, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o MAEOPP Conference o MI-ACPA Conference (Presenter) o MICAPP Conference Departmental staff publications and presentations at state and national conferences, degrees and certificates earned, grants successfully obtained. • Ariel Arnold (Program Advisor, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o MI-ACPA Presentation • Care McLean (Program Coordinator, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o MI-ACPA Presentation • Marnie Parris-Bingle (Program Advisor, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o Michigan Department of Health and Human Services – Independent Life Skills Coach Grant (3 year/$375,000) • Gabriel Pena (Academic Advisor) o MIACADA Presentation • MarcQus Wright (Director, TRiO SSS Traditional Program) o MI-ACPA Presentation

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 2.C.1

6 units are engaged departments.

Baseline

2 cohorts consisting of 3 unique academic departments participated in the Engaged Department Initiative over the span of 3 years.

Progress

2018 Status
Achieved
The EDI program is completed.

Strategic Priority Area 3: Ensure the alignment of institutional structures and functions.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 3.C.1

GVSU nurtures and sustains at least one systemic, interdisciplinary initiative planned in collaboration with key community partners that can offer project-based experiences for students.

Baseline

GVSU is in the process of developing community initiatives in at least two neighborhoods and with one school district.

Progress

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
In May 2018 a meeting was convened to provide updates on the Place-based initiatives found in the GVSU Civic Action Plan. This meeting provided an opportunity for GVSU faculty and staff to connect with some of the original community partners who came together to write this portion of the plan and communicate areas of both need and accomplishment. Moving forward from both the original Civic Action Plan and the update meeting, a community literacy support tool has been developed through the Westside Collaborative for use in Grand Rapids Public Schools and will be piloted in Sibley and Stocking Elementary schools on Grand Rapids west side. The tool is a set of interactive video modules that are designed to communicate a common language for literacy support in light of new state standards for literacy by 3rd grade for all Michigan students. The tool will be used to train community volunteers and GVSU students who will serve as reading tutors, paraprofessionals and/or student teachers in these schools where there isn't enough staff to work with all of the students in need of tutoring.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
In the context of the development of a Civic Action Plan for GVSU, we are piloting a place-based institution initiative on the Westside of Grand Rapids, a location where we already have deep relationships and a number of community-based learning opportunities for our students. In December 2016, we recruited a team of community partners and GVSU faculty and staff to develop a plan in the areas of K-12 education, health and safety, and economic development.

Strategic Priority Area 4: Enhance the institution's image and reputation.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 4.A.1

Create the "Laker Effect Map" to showcase the geographic areas where GVSU students, staff and faculty are engaged with community partners in the region, state and beyond.

Baseline

Go "live" with Laker Effect Map in October 2018.

Progress

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
The Laker Effect Map is on track to go "live" in October 2018.

Objective 4.A.2

The LAKER Academic Success Center will contribute to GVSU winning the Directors Cup, by helping the student athletes maintain good academic standing.

Baseline

Average GPA 3.05 (fall) and 3.06 (winter). 94.7% of Student Athletes were in good academic standing (2.0 or higher, which is necessary to be eligible to compete).

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 4.C.1

Community partnerships will be maintained. New partnerships will be explored and developed as appropriate.

Baseline

Community partnerships provide a base for GVSU faculty, staff and students to engage in a variety of High-Impact Practices for teaching and learning. The Laker Effect Map will provide a snapshot of where GVSU community partnerships are located and who holds them from GVSU. Partnerships will be more recognizable and therefore more easily supported. Geographic locations without GVSU partnerships and GVSU departments lacking community partnerships will also become more recognizable for targeted exploration and development.

Objective 4.C.2

Hold Civic Engagement Showcase every 2 years to provide a venue for faculty, staff and students to share and celebrate community engagement projects, research, best practices and partnerships with each other and the communities they serve.

Baseline

The most recent Civic Engagement Showcase took place in April 2017, where faculty, staff and community partners came together to share community engagement activity. The GVSU Civic Action Plan was also introduced at this time, receiving public endorsement from President Haas.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 4.D.1

Address community problems/needs/issues with community partners through innovative solutions, ideas, leadership and advocacy.

Baseline

The Laker Effect Challenge event calls on the GVSU community to work closely with a community partner to propose a project that could be selected to receive funding for implementation after being presented to a panel of community partner/member judges in a competition based format. In Fall 2017 the event featured 7 proposals that were verbally pitched to judges in competition for a piece (or all) of the $5000 available in total prize money in addition to 4 poster project proposals that were voted on by audience members in competition for $500 in prize money. The prize money is be used towards the implementation of the winning proposal(s). The next Laker Effect Challenge took place on April 12, 2018, 6 presenters (finalists) competed in collaboration with their respective community partners for the $5000 prize where 4 different teams won a share of the funds to support initiatives in Grand Rapids Public Schools, a community garden on Grand Rapids west side and for a non-emergency medical transportation service.

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