Joel Quamme

Joel Quamme

Associate Professor
B.A. Jamestown College, Jamestown, ND
M.A. University of California, Davis
Ph.D. University of California, Davis
Office: 1311 Au Sable Hall
Phone: 616-331-2153
Email: quammej@gvsu.edu

Current Semester Schedule


Specialization

Cognitive, Cognitive Neuroscience

Courses Taught

PSY 101 - Introductory Psychology
PSY 365 - Cognition
PSY 370 - Cognitive Neuroscience

Research Interests

I study human memory. I am interested in the cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie our ability to remember prior events. Most of my work is aimed at characterizing how people make use of different types of information to make recognition decisions. When deciding whether a stimulus was encountered before, to what extent do we rely on the general familiarity of the item and to what extent do we rely on the recollection of specific details about the prior event during which the stimulus previously occurred? In my research I’ve been investigating how these two sources of evidence are represented in memory, how people combine them to make decisions in different situations, and how the brain gives rise to these processes.

Recent Publications

Quamme, J. R., Kurby, C. A., & Marks, L. R. (2018, November) Event boundaries and recognition memory for associative information in narrative text. Poster session presented at the Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, New Orleans, LA.

Quamme, J. R., Marks, L. R., & Kurby, C. A. (2015, November). Event segmentation and associative recognition for narrative details. Poster session presented at the Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Chicago, IL.

Kurby, C. A., Quamme, J. R. & Marks, L. R. (2014, August), Associative memory for story information is modulated by the perception of event boundaries. Poster session presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Text and Discourse, Chicago, IL.

Quamme. J. R., Migo, E., Holmes, S., Bendell, A., Norman, K. A., Mayes, A. R. & Montaldi, D. (2014, April). Individual differences in older adults" forced-choice recognition memory: Partitioning contributions of recollection and familiarity. Poster session presented at the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Boston, MA.

Quamme, J. R., Tremble, L., & Rhodes, J. (2011, November). Unitization and the word-frequency effect in recognition. Poster session presented at the Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Seattle, WA. 



Page last modified September 4, 2018