people are silhouetted against a background projected on two walls that looks like an aquarium

Interactive health technology on display at GRPM exhibit

Grand Valley is well represented within a Grand Rapids Public Museum exhibit that highlights the evolution of medicine and the role area corporations, organizations, colleges and universities have within the field.

"The Marvels of Medicine" is a featured exhibit at GRPM, 272 Pearl St. NW, through May 22.

The exhibit features an immersive technology room and infant manikin from Grand Valley's Simulation Center and a hand brace made by an occupational science and therapy professor.

Katie Branch, director of simulation, sits in the immersive technology booth at the Grand Rapids Public Museum exhibit. The booth resembles a Simulation Center room in the DeVos Center for Interprofessional Health.
Katie Branch, director of simulation, sits in the immersive technology booth at the Grand Rapids Public Museum exhibit. The booth resembles a Simulation Center room in the DeVos Center for Interprofessional Health.
Kendra Stanley-Mills
black and white photo of a man looking at a museum exhibit, a skeleton is in foreground
Doug Ayers, simulation coordinator at the Simulation Center, tours the Marvels of Medicine exhibit.
Kendra Stanley-Mills

Katie Branch, director of simulation, said the booth allows museum visitors to be immersed in an interactive 360-degree scene. Three walls of the booth can be programmed to play images and sounds from any environment: hospital setting, car accident or inside a home, for example.

"This collaboration with GRPM allows Grand Valley to showcase the type of technology we have to educate students who are interested in nursing or health professions," Branch said. "When school groups are going through the exhibit, they enjoy being in the immersion room and being able to interact with the touch points on the walls."

Jeanine Beasley, professor of occupational science and therapy, created a hand brace for the Mary Free Bed and Rehabilitation exhibit. The brace places the fingers in the correct position, yet allows the fingers to move after surgery.

woman standing in front of museum exhibit case with model of hand brace in it
Jeanine Beasley, professor of occupational science and therapy, created a hand brace for the Mary Free Bed and Rehabilitation exhibit.
courtesy photo
hand brace in a museum exhibit case
The brace places the fingers in the correct position, yet allows the fingers to move after surgery.
Kendra Stanley-Mills