Issues - Globalization

Globalization — including issues related to capitalism, economic justice, health, migration and immigration, communication, borders, education, etc.


Student Learning Outcomes

1. Explain how complementary and competing perspectives contribute to the ongoing discussion about globalization.

2. Collaboration: Effectively work on a team.

3. Problem solving: Design and evaluate an approach to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.

4. Integration: Synthesize and apply knowledge from experiences and multiple fields of study.


Courses

AAA/PLS 319 — African Politics
A study of social and economic forces that shape the political processes in Africa through a combination of individual cases and general themes. Topics include precolonial and colonial politics, regional integration, democratic transitions, state collapse and violence, ethnicity,  gender and class, civil society, development, and Africa’s role in world affairs. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving

AAA/HST 357 — The Black Diaspora and the Meaning of Sports, 1800 to the Present
This course explores the Black Diaspora (1800-present) through the lens of the black athlete in order to help examine global issues such as race, politics, economics, and gender. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

AHS 330 — Health Care: A Global Perspective
This course examines public health and its links between global health, social and economic development and the impact on creating healthy societies. The course will provide students with an understanding of the risks diseases pose to world-wide society and the burden of disease related costs on individual cultures. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving

ANT 345 — Perspectives on Globalization
The anthropology of globalization examines the emergence of “globalized local cultures.” Students employ the ethnographic approach to understand globalization as the intensification of interconnectedness in which anthropologists learn that fundamental problems of deep and universal concern to humans everywhere will need to be addressed at local, national, and global levels. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

ART 323 - Rethinking Renaissance Art
Thematic examination of the visual arts produced between 1400 and 1650 focusing on intersections between Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Topics include the artist and society, civic and domestic contexts for the arts, as well as the representation of self and community. Explores concepts of Renaissance art in later eras. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

ART 422 - Art and the Worlds of Islam
Examines the arts and material culture produced in Islamic contexts between the 7th century and the present. Themes include patronage, materials, reception, cultures in contact, plurality of meaning, as well as colonial and post-colonial circumstances. Also explores the work of contemporary artists in relation to transnational contexts. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

CHI 324 - Contemporary Chinese Culture
An introduction to contemporary Chinese popular culture. Using a variety of primary source materials, including film, television dramas, reality shows, literature, art, and artifacts, it explores popular culture's relations to social change, public spaces, the state, individual freedom, collective justice, national and social identities, and globalization. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, integration, oral communication, problem solving

CJ/DS 335 - Digital Crime, Media and Culture
Examination of digital communication and media in relation to crime and victimization as it intersects with the United States and international criminal justice systems. Investigation of the use of digital spaces and media in relation to cultures of privacy, fraud, trafficking, emancipation, terror and perceptions of expanding and retracting democracy. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving

CLA 301 — Re-imagining the Classics
Study of classical authors, genres, ideas, or aspects of visual culture and the ways they have been understood, adapted and transformed in new cultural environments of later periods. The course may consider genres such as epic, lyric, or comedy; mythology or the history of ideas; styles of architecture or painting. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

CLA 302 — The Stages of Greek and Roman Drama
Readings of Greek and Roman tragedies and comedies by playwrights such as Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Plautus (in English translation) will be augmented by considerations of cultural contexts, both ancient and modern global, and staging or adaptation. The dramas engage issues from competing perspectives on violence, gender, class, and justice. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

ECO 349 — Emerging Markets Issues*
Examines economic growth and development in emerging markets throughout the world. Topics include policies to stimulate economic growth; the role of international trade, natural resources, and agriculture in economic development; foreign aid and multinational investment
in transitional economies; and the human resource issues of education, health, and migration. Prerequisite: Junior standing, and ECO 200 or ECO 210. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, oral communication, problem solving 

ECO 365 — Comparative Economic Systems*
Relative to such economic goals as economic freedom, full employment, growth, efficiency, consumer welfare, equitable distribution of income, and security, how well do alternative economic systems perform? This course studies contemporary, evolving capitalist, socialist, and mixed systems in different countries. Prerequisites: Junior standing and ECO 200 or ECO 210. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

EDF 316 — Global Perspectives on Education
Globalization is changing the purposes of education around the world, both increasing competition and enhancing global citizenship. This course will examine the inter-relationship between socio-cultural contexts and education in multiple countries, the impact of globalization on educational policies and practices, and global perspectives on these emerging challenges and opportunities. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving

GPY 335 — Globalization and Development
Development involves positive and negative social, political, economic, cultural, and environmental changes for people living in a region or a country. GPY 335 explores the complex geography of the processes associated with development and in particular global development.
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

GPY 350 — Geopolitics, Energy, and Environment of Russia and Central Eurasia
This course examines the unique role of Russia and Central Eurasia in the world’s energy, water, and food security and many global geopolitical processes of the 21st century. With its complex ethnocultural composition and vast deposits of oil, gas, coal, and uranium, this region is strategically important for the U.S. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, oral communication, problem solving 

GPY 354 — Geography and Globalization of Asia
Introduction and survey of the physical and cultural geographies of Asia, their influence on the globalization of Asian economies, and the migration of Asian peoples. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

GPY 362 — Farmers, Crops, and Our Challenging Agricultural World
A geography of the world’s agricultural practices and development at different scales, from traditional methods to industrial agriculture with an emphasis on farming societies. Topics include indigenous agriculture and crop domestication, agroforestry and plantation systems, land use and rural societies, export crops, aquaculture and livestock, and drug cultivation. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, integration, problem solving

HST 332 — Emergence of Modern India and South Asia
Examines the emergence of Modern India and South Asia from the 17th century to the present. Topics include: tradition, modernity, imperialism, culture, religion, women and gender, migration, globalization, human rights, nationalism, Indian diaspora, and conflict and cooperation between
the South Asian countries and between India and major world powers. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

LIB/HST/HRT 319 — Human Traffic and Trafficking
Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches to globalization, the course critically examines the forced and/or coercive global transfer of people, the traffic and trafficking of humans, through historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics may include migrant smuggling, forced labor, slave trade, sex workers, voices of survival workers, and self-advocacy in survival communities. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

LIB 331 — Person and Profession in a Global Environment
A study of how professional identities and work lives develop globally and historically as well as throughout ones’ individual lifespan, looking at how professional choices are shaped by intersectional identities and global social/economic forces as portrayed in literature, film, art, and social analysis. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

MGT 303 — International Business and Culture*
An introduction to the issues that a company will experience when doing business in a global economy. Emphasis is on the influence of culture on business practices. Topics may also include economic structures, marketing approaches, accounting and financial issues, management and organization
issues, and distribution issues. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

PA 372 — International and Comparative Administration
An examination of administrative structures in selected countries; the relationship of administrative structures to political, economic, and cultural systems; comparative administration and developmental models. Case studies from the U.S., Europe, Latin America, and Asia may be used. Offered on sufficient demand. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

REL 335 — Sacred Texts – Global Contexts
A comparative study of sacred texts as literary masterpieces that shape and influence their respective cultural expressions and literary traditions. This interdisciplinary course will examine the multiple intersections of sacred texts with the many faces of globalization. Readings may include selections from: Rig Veda, Upanishad, Bible, Qur’an, and Tao Te Ching. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

SOC 355 — Sociology of Work and Employment
Provides an understanding of the current labor market through an examination of the changing dynamics of work, occupational structure, and labor relations in the U.S. and globally. Analyzes the impact of globalization on workers, and the efforts of workers’ movements to respond to new economic challenges. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving

SOC 377 — Globalization: Structures and Movements
Examines and critiques the historical origins, economic and technological foundations, institutional arrangements, ideological underpinnings, collective movements, and controversial outcomes of transnationalism and globalization. Sociological analysis emphasizes macrolevel institutions that shape globalization, social conflicts arising from its effects, and the consequences of global change on individuals, groups, and organizations. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

STA 341 — Demographic Methods
An application-oriented overview of procedures and techniques for the collection, evaluation, and analysis of demographic data. Topics include sources of and problems with vital statistics data, data registries, and surveys; measures of population growth, composition, fertility, mortality, and migration. Prerequisite: Junior standing and STA 215 or STA 312. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

WRT 354 — Writing in the Global Context: Culture, Technology, and Language Practices
This course prepares students for the challenges of writing in the global context. Through analysis and practice, students will learn to write and design documents that respond to the needs of local and global audiences in the 21st-century workplace. Focus: communication competence, cultural dimension of language and design. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Skills: collaboration, integration, problem solving 

 

*You must have completed 55 credits to enroll in 300- to 400-level Seidman College of Business courses. If you are a nonbusiness major with a 2.5 overall GPA, please email your name, G-number, course, and semester to go2gvbiz@gvsu.edu to request a permit to register. Secondary admissions criteria applies for business majors.