Robert Deaner

Robert Deaner

Associate Professor
B.A., Colgate University
Ph.D., Duke University
Office: 1315 Au Sable Hall
Phone: (616) 331-2423
Email: deanerr@gvsu.edu


Specialization

Evolutionary; Sex Differences; Sports

Courses Taught

PSY300 - SWS Research Methods in Psychology

PSY315 - Psychology of Sex Differences

PSY375 - Comparative Psychology

Recent Publications

Lombardo, M., & Deaner, R. O. (2018). On the evolution of sex differences in throwing: Throwing is a male adaptation in humans. Quarterly Review of Biology, 93, 91 - 119.

Deaner, R. O., Balish, S. M., & Lombardo, M. P. (2016). Sex differences in sports: An evolutionary perspective. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 10, 73 - 97. 

Deaner, R. O., Lowen, A, Rogers, W., & Saksa, E. (2015). Does the sex difference in competitiveness decrease in selective sub-populations? A test with intercollegiate distance runners. PeerJ, 3: e884.

Deaner, R. O., Carter, R. E., Joyner, M. J., & Hunter, S. K. (2015). Men are more likely than women to slow in the marathon. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47, 607-616. 

Lombardo, M., & Deaner, R. O. (2014). You can’t teach speed: Sprinters falsify the deliberate practice model of expertise. PeerJ, 2, e445.
 
Winegard, B. M., Winegard, B., & Deaner, R. O. (2014). Misrepresentations of evolutionary psychology in sex and gender textbooks. Evolutionary Psychology, 12, 474-508.

Lowen, A., Deaner, R. O., & Schmitt, E. (2014). Guys and gals going for gold: The role of gender empowerment in Olympic success. Journal of Sports Economics.
                                                                        
Deaner, R. O., Lowen, A. & Cobley, S. (2013). Born at the wrong time: Selection bias in the NHL draft. PLoS ONE, 8, e57753.

Deaner, R. O., & Smith, B. A. (2013). Sex differences in sports across 50 societies. Cross-Cultural Research. 47, 268-309.
 
Deaner, R. O., Geary, D.C., Puts, D. P., Ham, S.A., Kruger, J., Fles, E., Winegard, B., & Grandis, T. (2012). An evolved sex difference in the predisposition for physical competition: Males play sports much more than females even in the contemporary U.S. PLoS ONE, 7, e49168.

Winegard, B. M., & Deaner, R. O. (2010). The evolutionary significance of Red Sox Nation: Sport fandom as a byproduct of coalitional psychology. Evolutionary Psychology, 8, 432-446.
 



Page last modified December 14, 2018