Native American Heritage Month


ReThinking Columbus: A Movement Towards Indigenous Peoples Day

Monday, October 10, 2016
6:00 pm - 8:00 p.m.
Cook DeWitt Auditorium, Allendale Campus

This program will feature a panel discussion that takes a deeper look at the history of what is now Columbus Day in much of the U.S. Panelists will discuss the historical and social impact of the colonization of the Americas, as well as current movements that challenge the holiday.  Students are encouraged to interact with panelists through discussion. The program will also include a Native drum circle and cultural teachings. 

Rethinking Columbus

Connections to the Classroom:  Learning Outcomes

Social Justice & Human Rights: LIB 100
1.  Upon completion of this program, attendees will have gained new awareness about the history and social impact of the colonization of the Americas. 

Oppression/Discrimination: LIB 201
2. Upon completion of this program, attendees will be able to describe the movement by Native Americans towards a recognized Indigenous People's Day as a counter celebration of Columbus Day. 

Diverse Communities: LIB 201
3. Upon completion of this program, attendees will be able to analyze the history of Columbus Day and how it impacts Native Americans today.


Gi-gikinomaage-min: Defend Our History, Unlock Your Spirit

Diversity Brown Bag Series Presents: Preserving the Norton Burial Mounds

Thursday, October 20, 2016
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

2263 Kirkhof Center, Allendale Campus

The 55 acre Norton Mound National Historic Landmark is one of only a few surviving Hopewellian burial mound groups that were once present in the lower Grand River Valley and the only one of which the mounds themselves are still in existence. Originally consisting of 17 burial mounds, it is located on a flood plain of the Grand River a short distance south of the city limits of Grand Rapids. The historical significance of this site was recognized in 1965 when it was designated as a National Historic Landmark.  The Museum is currently working with community input to develop future plans for respectful preservation of and educational access to the site. 

Dr. Jeff Chivis will facilitate an interactive workshop that will include an historical overview of the area, along with current efforts within the Native American community to restore the burial mounds and capture the personal stories of the families and ancestors.   

Dr. Chivis is a citizen of Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi and a faculty member in the GVSU Anthropology Department.  

 

Connections to the Classroom:  Learning Outcomes

Social Justice & Human Rights: (LIB100)

1.  Upon completion of this program, attendees will be able to discuss the history of the Hopewellian people in the West Michigan area and the current work being done to preserve the burial mounds. 

Diverse Communities: (LIB 201)
2. Upon completion of this program, attendees will be able to explain why it is imperative to the Native American community to be culturally appropriate when handling the ancestral remains and the sacred land. 

Oppression and Discrimination: (LIB 201)
3. Upon completion of this program, attendees will be able to discuss the historical trauma and ongoing discrimination against the Native American community and how it has a lasting impact on today’s contemporary Native American families. 


Native American Student Association Day of Service

Saturday, October 22, 2016
9:00 am - 3:00 pm 
Off Campus Service Project 

The Native American Student Association (NASA) is proud to partner with the Community Service Learning Center for the annual Make a Difference Day.  

Join NASA in our clean up efforts at the Norton Mound National Historic Landmark. The 55-acre Norton Mound National Historic Landmark is one of a few surviving Hopewellian burial mound groups that were once present in the lower Grand River Valley. It is the only one where the mounds still exist. NASA is working with the Grand Rapids Public Museum and local Native community members to ensure proper respect and honor is given during the project.

Space is limited; Pre-Registration is Required.
Registration is available through OrgSync, or by emailing Kristie Scanlon at scanlokr@gvsu.edu. 

Gi-gikinomaage-min: Defend Our History, Unlock Your Spirit


Dr. Adrienne Keene

Friday Film Screening: Reel Injun

Friday, November 4, 2016 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM 
1240 Kirkhof Center, Allendale Campus

Reel Injun is a 2009 Canadian documentary film directed by Cree filmmaker Neil Diamond that explores the portrayal of Native Americans in film. Reel Injun explores many stereotypes about Natives in film, from the Noble savage to the Drunken Indian. The film also explores Hollywood's practice of using Italian Americans to portray Indians in the movies. 


Gi-gikinomaage-min: Defend Our History, Unlock Your Spirit

Friday Film Screening: The Canary Effect

Friday, November 11, 2016 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM 
1240 Kirkhof Center, Allendale Campus

Delving deeply into the often misunderstood and frequently over looked historic realities of the American Indian, The Canary Effect follows the terrifying and horrific abuses instilled upon the Indigenous people of North America, and details the genocidal practices of the US government and its continuing affects on present day Indian country.

Featuring interviews with the leading scholars and experts on Indian issues including controversial author Ward Churchill, the film brings together the past and present in a way never before captured so eloquently and boldly on film.


Native Heritage Celebration Coordinator

Kristie Scanlon, MSW
Assistant Director
Office of Multicultural Affairs
Grand Valley State University
Email: scanlokr@gvsu.edu
Phone: (616) 331-2177



Page last modified September 28, 2016