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Strategic Plan for Student Services

Mission

The Division of Student Services fosters lifelong learning through programs and services that engage all students in the University community, support their academic, personal and professional goals, and positively impact student success.

Vision

The Division of Student Services strives to be a leader in the field of Student Affairs, providing exemplary programs and services that enhance student success and advance an unparalleled educational experience that creates engaged and independent students who are prepared to be active, principled contributors and leaders within their professions and communities.

Value Statement

Core Values

  1. Learning
    We value lifelong learning by providing engaging real world opportunities that enhance the classroom experience by teaching our students valuable life skills, which prepare them for success after college.
  2. Community
    We value community and we continually work to strengthen our ties to the University, the local community, and beyond through active citizenship, traditions, teamwork, and collaborations.
  3. Academic Success
    We value academic success as demonstrated by our inclusive approach to student development through our comprehensive support programs and services, our partnership with Academic Affairs and the Academic Colleges and our respect for the core academic mission of the University.
  4. Diversity
    We value and appreciate diversity by promoting education, respect, and civility through our partnership with the Division of Inclusion and Equity and our inclusive and accessible programming and services for all students.
  5. Personal Development
    We value personal development by providing programs, resources, and mentoring designed to promote students’ growth and talent development in their journey to become their best selves.
  6. Professionalism
    We value professionalism, respect, and interpersonal excellence by providing high quality services and programs which enhance the student experience, respond to the changing demands of the University environment, and prepare our students to have professional interactions during and after their time at Grand Valley State University.
  7. Free Expression
    We value and support an individual’s right to free expression of thoughtsincluding the right to hold and voice opinions, consider the perspectives of others, and seek, receive, and impart information and ideas.
  8. Mental & Physical Wellness
    We value the mental and physical wellness of our campus community by providing holistic programs, activities, and services that help support healthy lifestyles and promote student success.

Strategic Priorities, outcomes, and key objectives

Strategic Priority Area 1: Actively engage learners at all levels.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 1.A.1

The Division of Student Services will ensure optimal involvement and leadership opportunities.

Baseline

83.8% (Fall 2015)

Progress

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
Current assessment data across all departments show students who participated with Division programs, services, employment, and offerings are increasingly retained at higher levels than students who do not (e.g. students in campus residence halls, students on intramural sports teams); Division staff responded to students that identified they needed (or were at risk) help in a variety of ways meeting each student’s individual needs; numerous Division staff serve on EDPAC retention-related committees, some in leadership roles (e.g. Interim Associate Dean, Vice Provost and Dean).

2017 Status
Minimal Progress
- The University Counseling Center implemented a structured College Conversation support group targeted to FTIAC students experiencing adjustment distress, difficulty connecting on campus, mental health issues, and other barriers to success. - The Career Development Team provided career exploration resources (i.e. Focus 2, world of work information) at 7 interactive registration sessions for first year students as they begin to establish their schedule and enroll for their sophomore year. - Housing and Residence Life helped to positively contribute to this overall goal as students that continue to live on campus have a higher rate of retention and shorter time to graduation. - Student Ombuds provided presentations to first year classes to share with them resources on campus to help them succeed. - Strong Performance data for TRIO SSS Traditional Program including 95% Persistence Rate, 97% Good Academic Standing, and 77% Achieved a bachelor’s degree within 6 years (2010-11 cohort) - Oliver Wilson Freshman Academy completed the 5th Academic Success Institute, served 78 students with average ACT of 17.5, 92.3% persistence rate from Fall to Winter Semester, and 75% persistence rate from Fall to Fall

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The Division of Student Services initiated a retention audit in order to examine current practices that attribute to student success within the division. Additionally, the Dean of Students Office and Student Academic Success Center launched a pilot staff to student Success Mentor program for first-year and transfer students who fall below a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. These students have been assigned to a Success Mentor from the Division of Student Services or Division of Inclusion and Equity who have started meeting one-on-one with assigned students and provide intrusive guidance and support, partnering with academic advisors and faculty. This expanded academic support program is intended to provide a broader framework for working with students who are on Jeopardy of Dismissal or Academic Probation, so that they are positioned to be successful, persist, and ultimately graduate from GVSU. The Division of Student Services is partnering with the Division of Enrollment Development (Registrar’s Office and Office of Institutional Analysis) for data analysis. Additionally, various departments within the Division of Student Services have made a commitment to student success and retention. For example, the Career Center saw higher retention for Freshman students who engaged with the Career Center. Another example is University Counseling Center's post-treatment client survey data which demonstrates the positive impact UCC services have on factors contributing to retention and graduation.

Objective 1.A.2

The Division of Student Services will expand health and wellness opportunities.

Baseline

48.4, 5 (GVSU 2016)

Progress

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
The Division administered and distributed the National College Health Assessment survey (e.g. DSS Newsletter, UAS Campus Life Committee); increased the number and targeting of wellness programming (e.g. Veteran Education Peer Advisors, ACES preventive programming); formed a Greek Life Task Force to address prevalence of alcohol within fraternity sorority life.

2017 Status
Minimal Progress
- Resident Assistants (RA) are selected as excellent and involved student leaders to take on a very important leadership opportunity for the GVSU on-campus student populations. Following our Residential Curriculum (RC), RA staff participates in year-round training and engagement with leadership, academic, citizenship, and intercultural development. This year-round training is comprehensive and the experience is intentionally connected to in class learning, service to community, exploration of one’s own privilege and identity, future career, and vocational opportunities. - Civic engagement via the Community Service learning Center saw 1828 students logging 43,156 hours of community engagement (valued at $1.0 million) - 55 Registered Student Organizations are supported by the Community Service Learning Center and 20 participating campus units contribute to efforts. Activities include: Voter registration, Democracy 101 series, Alternative breaks, residential service initiative, Grand Neighborhood Orientation and other service initiatives. - Working with faculty, DOS, Housing and Residence Life, Registrar, Admissions, Provost’s office and the BCOIS and CLAS Deans offices, a First Year Learning Community was established. Holton-Hooker Living Center and associated classrooms will be utilized. - Faculty teaching first year courses are being recruited to “connect” their classes in a deliberate and intentional way. While this is not intended to be co-curricular, faculty are working together to establish commonalities and shared assignments between their content areas. They are also supported by extra curricular programs related to course themes. Work is ongoing with admissions to recruit students to pre-register with the registrar prior to their orientation session.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The Division of Student Services hosted the inaugural Laker session of the Institute by LeaderShape (May 4-9 2017). The LeaderShape Institute was six days of dialogue and self-discovery in a supportive learning community. The LeaderShape Institute challenged participants to lead with integrity while working towards a vision grounded in their deepest values. Participants explored not only what they want to do, but who they want to be. Dynamic, challenging, and exciting, the week was intended to produce a breakthrough in the leadership capacity of participants—benefiting them individually, as well as their respective communities and the organizations they will go on to lead and serve in the future.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 1.B.1

The Division of Student Services will help student leaders develop the capacity to co-create inclusive environments.

Baseline

39.81, 38.31 (GVSU 2016)

Progress

2018 Status
Minimal Progress
New and enhanced Division student and student leader training programs show gains in cultural awareness (e.g. RA training); policy and practice evaluations highlighted possible invisible barriers to inclusion (e.g. Campus Recreation participation fees).

2017 Status
Substantive Progress
- Housing and Residence Life depends greatly on the work of our students including Resident Assistants (RA) to deeply know the students that are living within the communities. The RA staff then design and offer insight for programming that will best engage and support students in the GVSU community. This co-creation of an engaging on-campus community provides a deep connection to GVSU both for the RA and for the students. Intercultural Mentors – this mentor group is a true co-creation of learning and understanding. The IMs spend the fall semester engaging in Intergroup Dialogues (IGD) with the intent of learning how to facilitate IGD for residential students. The researched data about IGD is that it is one of the most effective ways to impact change to a more inclusive campus culture. As we train more of the RA and IM staff, as well as the full-time and graduate staff in HRL on IGD, the closer we move to being able to offer these relationship building exercises for students living on campus. This is one of our goals for the upcoming year. Community Councils – community council is an excellent and immediate way to involve students in co-creation of engaging environments right where they live. HRL continues to encourage these councils and development of students as leaders within their communities. - Diverse students were recruited and participated in the NASPA Undergraduate Fellows Program (NUFP). - Campus Recreation provided Inclusion and Diversity Training to student staff in Fall 2017 and will do another training in Winter 2018. For the Fall 2017 training, our student employees participated in a pre- and post-training survey. Student employees reported knowledge gained related to diversity and inclusive issues following the training as well as how to create a more inclusive environment. The impact of providing educational opportunities related to diversity and inclusion topics is clear as Campus Recreation student employees self-report their learning and have also shared they would like additional opportunities to gain knowledge in this area. - The University Counseling Center’s Peer Education Program trains students to provide leadership and education across campus in areas of wellness and mental health social justice. Peer educators receive training in issues of social justice and inclusion as preparation for their campus discussions of the Unnatural Causes documentary series. Unnatural Causes explores disparity in health care systems related to underrepresented groups. Peer educators engage in self-exploration related to inclusion efforts and attend at least one multiculturally focused professional conference each year. The peer education team presented Peer Education: Expanding Outreach and Diversity Initiatives at the annual Association of University and College Counseling Center Outreach Professionals conference in Columbus, Ohio in June 2016.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The Division of Student Services has made a commitment to implementing student employee training related to cultural competence, active bystanders, and bias incident reporting. Within the Housing Office's Residential Curriculum, a main area of focus is intercultural competency. All RA staff are trained each year, in partnership with I&E, on personal identity, group identity, GVSU Demographics and Climate, identity groups and support systems for these students, debate vs. dialogue, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, microaggressions, power, privilege and oppression, hate crimes, bias incidents, and free speech. Housing and Residence Life's Intercultural Mentors are a mentor group which spend the fall semester engaging in Intergroup Dialogues (IGD) with the intent of learning how to facilitate IGD for residential students. The researched data about IGD is that it is one of the most effective ways to impact change to a more inclusive campus culture. Campus Recreation continued to provide trainings related to diversity and inclusion to their student staff. Also Campus Recreation provided opportunities that supported minority student engagement such as All Gender Yoga. Student Life's Alternate Break leaders received training on cultural competence prior to trip leading. In addition, the Laker Traditions team's Intercultural Festival provides an opportunity for students to increase their intercultural knowledge.

Strategic Priority Area 2: Further develop exceptional personnel.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 2.B.1

The Division of Student Services will develop staff members with the competency to create inclusive environments.

Baseline

100% of Division staff members will attend

Progress

2018 Status
Minimal Progress
Additional staff training is being offered throughout the Division (e.g. April 2019 Division All-Staff Meeting); professional development opportunities highlight changes in regional and national diversity (e.g. Shared Professional Development Day); units beginning to assess organizational documents for reference to diversity, equity and inclusion (e.g. Student Life Mission Statement).

2017 Status
Substantive Progress
Campus Recreation professional staff completed KOGNITO’s online training program Veterans on Campus for Faculty & Staff to better understand and support our student veterans. Also, two Campus Recreation staff members attended the White Privilege Conference. The University Counseling Center hosted a day-long seminar, The Necessity of Talking about Religion and Spirituality in Public Spaces, to provide training for staff in creating inclusive campus communities. Housing and Residential Life spent time in intergroup dialogue about the ways to involve all perspectives in the everyday work of serving and supporting students as well as how best to serve each other. In partnership with I&E many staff participated in a hosted 2-day training. HRL's entire full-time and graduate staff participated. DSS launched two training options for faculty and staff to better support GV’s military-connected students. The Office of Student Life partnered with the Division of Inclusion and Equity to assess office culture, programs and systems, using a social justice lens, in order to more deeply integrate the values of equity and inclusion in to their work. The Career Center partnered with I & E to train employer partners who place students in internships to ensure that employer environments are welcoming and inclusive.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A Shared Professional Development Series has been created and implemented with colleagues from the Division of Inclusion and Equity, the Division of Enrollment Development, the Pew Faculty Teaching and Learning Center and Academic Advising. This series included conversations focused on student success with the goal of bringing together faculty and staff from across the University to share broader perspectives and gain greater knowledge to better serve students. In addition, many Division of Student Services staff members attended professional development related to diversity and inclusion such as workshops through the Division of Inclusion & Equity or off campus conferences such as NCORE. For example, four Housing staff members attended the ACPA Equity and Inclusion Conference. Campus Recreation completed an Intentional Marketing Assessment in December 2016 to improve the diversity of students shared in social media platforms to better represent the student body. Campus Recreation collaborated with Mary Free Bed to offer a Wheelchair Basketball event. Able-bodied students and staff participated in Wheelchair Basketball alongside the athletes. Campus Rec's Graduate Assistant in Inclusive/Adaptive Recreation completed the “If you can play, you can play” video. Campus Recreation continued to provide staff training related to diversity and inclusion. Housing and Residence Life staff developed a residential curriculum where intercultural competence is a focus.

Strategic Priority Area 3: Ensure the alignment of institutional structures and functions.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 3.A.1

The Division of Student Services will implement current national crises management and student expectation protocols.

Baseline

2.61, 2.75 (GVSU 2016)

Progress

2018 Status
Achieved
Red Folder Training created; Division Emergency Management Plan finalized; Student Death Protocol created; Division Emergency Management Advisory Committee roles clarified; Expressive Speech Policy created; Grounds and Facilities Use Policy created.

2017 Status
Substantive Progress
A divisional crisis response handbook was finalized. DSS participated in university wide crisis efforts including Emergency Management Team and table top exercises. The Assistant Dean of Students attended the Harvard Kennedy School Crisis Leadership in Higher Education program. Also, Housing and Residence Life continued to prepare staff to lead an on-call duty system that operates 24 hours a day, 365 days per year.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The Division of Student Services has started reviewing student affairs student expectations, crisis management, and intervention protocols.

Objective 3.A.2

The Division of Student Services will increase the number of students served by better matching space use with institutional values.

Baseline

42.93, 43.54 (GVSU 2016)

Progress

2018 Status
Substantive Progress
The Division created new forums for students to voice concerns and needs for student-focused facilities and spaces (e.g. Kirkhof Philosophy Retreat, Vice Provost’s Student Advisory Board, Donuts with the Dean); key campus partners have affirmed the need for external assistance to plan for specific facilities (e.g. Copeland, Kistler, Robinson, Kirkhof); reconsideration of space within Student Services has begun (e.g. Counseling, SASC, TRIO); campus policies were created or revised (e.g. Expressive Policy, Grounds and Facilities Policy); office spaces modified to increase participation and/or comfort (e.g. Career Lab, Dean of Students Office).

2017 Status
Minimal Progress
The Division of Student Services assisted with the re-purposing of the second floor of Kleiner (located near first year residential students) for tutoring services. The Office of Student Life had an external review completed for their program which included a review of the Kirkhof Center Student Union as it related to student learning, union operations, and space utilization. Campus Recreation underwent a program review which included a review of recreation space at GVSU.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
This year we were able to accomplish a couple building projects. Housing and Residential Life celebrated the formal retirement of the Ravines Apartments and the opening of our state of the art Holton-Hooker Learning and Living Center (HHLC), a 500 first-year student bed and academic facility. This new residential facility was designed to bring residential and academic space together to meet the needs of first year students. HRL also partnered with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and the Brooks College of Interdisciplinary Studies (BCOIS) to offer Living Learning Communities in our living centers. Another building improvement project was completed as a result of student demand. The Recreation Center addition project addressed overcrowding of informal recreation spaces (weight room, indoor basketball courts, etc). Outside of building projects, the Division of Student Services (DSS) began a review of space, staffing, and program needs for individual DSS departments.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 3.E.1

The Division of Student Services will collaborate with campus partners to gain support for and strategically allocate resources to enhance student success.

Baseline

2.52, 2.84 (GVSU 2016)

Progress

2018 Status
Substantial Progress
A revised annual budget process (FY20) was instituted to provide more leadership inclusion, base budget analysis, and strategic prioritization; some historic expenditures were either halted or reduced to assure alignment with key priorities; creative resource development and strategic allocations increased; shared positions have been created; committee involvement audit begin to manage role, time, and contribution.

2017 Status
Minimal Progress
The Career Center partnered with 18 academic departments through the Internship Mini Grants (IMG) program. These partnerships have provided academic areas resources to develop, expand, or enhance internship initiatives for their students. This past grant cycle resulted in over 30 new employer relationships developed, 1100 students participating in IMG related programming, and approximately 265 internships secured. The Dean of Students Office partnered with Development to provide bi monthly newsletter updates to parents of students via the Laker family Network. Newsletters are timed with key messages we hope parents will pass along to students (registration, advising, events) to help engage their students and keep parents connected to the University. Campus Recreation partnered with University Development to provide outreach and support to our Club Sport programs to increase giving to programs. In 2017-18, there were 323 first-time donors to Club Sports. Collaboration in the area of students of concern is necessary due to the volume of reports (545 care reports for the all semester). Behavior Team restructured their meetings to meet the needs. Advocate allows real time distribution and response. Future conversations to bring more into the role of responder will take place moving forward.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The Division of Student Services has started to review programmatic efforts that are aligned with Student Success with University Development.

Strategic Priority Area 4: Enhance the institution's image and reputation.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 4.A.1

The Division of Student Services will be recognized for providing living-learning environments that contribute to GVSU student success by maintaining NSSE scores of at least 2.63 (First-Year Students) and 2.72 (Seniors).

Baseline

2.50, 2.63 (GVSU 2016)

Progress

2017 Status
Minimal Progress
Housing and Residence Life Programming: During the 2017-2018 academic year, 827 programs were offered to residential students. Of these programs, 149 were collaborative programs with campus partners. Each of the 827 programs were intentionally planned to meet residential learning domain areas of community building (400), academic success (165), intercultural competency (133), and citizenship (129). There was an approximate attendance of 13,015 throughout the year. Our staff and students were also able to bring the formal co-curriculum into the living centers through programming that met the requirements of LIB 100 and 201. GVSU Faculty continue to be an excellent partner to offer programming that connects formally to classroom content. On vs. Off Campus Metrics of Student Success show that the experience of living on campus had a positive impact on students enrolling for classes and completing the recommended number of credits on time.

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The Division of Student Services (Dean of Students Office and Office of Student Life- Community Service Learning Center) partnered with the Office for Community Engagement programs and campus-wide Civic Action Plan. During the 2016-2017 academic year, 928 HRL programs were offered to residential students. Of these programs, 160 were collaborative programs with campus partners. Each of the 928 programs were intentionally planned to meet our residential learning domain areas of community building, academic success, intercultural competency, and citizenship. There was an approximate attendance of 14,330 throughout the year. Our staff and students were also able to bring the formal co-curriculum into the living centers through programming that met the requirements of LIB 100 (22 total) and 201 (19 total). On vs. Off Campus Metrics of Student Success show that the experience of living on campus had a positive impact on students enrolling for classes and completing the recommended number of credits on time.

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