Division of Inclusion and Equity

Corrections/Clarifications for the Final IIP Report
 
On page 3 under the Executive Summary, section 1a: Access and Equity – Recruitment and Retention, the report states:
 
Financial aid and scholarships are critical to accessing higher education; therefore, the university Development Division established a host of new scholarships for students; post Michigan Proposal 2.  The scholarships are as follows:
  • Thomas and Joyce Wisner Engineering Scholarship Endowment
  • First Generation Urban Schools Scholarship
  • Hugo Salazar Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • DV Alpha Scholarship Endowment
  • Don Williams Sr. Dean Emeritus Multicultural Business Education (MBEC) Scholarship
  • Empowering Haiti through Education Fund
  • Thompson Working Family Scholars Program
  • Carl and Claudia Bajema Grand Rapids Urban Schools Endowed Scholarship
  • University Preparatory Academy Scholarship
It should have read:
 
Financial aid and scholarships are critical to accessing higher education; therefore, the university’s Development Division assisted donors in establishing scholarships in compliance with Michigan Proposal 2.  The scholarships are as follows:
  • Thomas and Joyce Wisner Engineering Scholarship Endowment
  • Hugo Salazar Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • DV Alpha Scholarship Endowment
  • Don Williams Sr. Dean Emeritus Multicultural Business Education (MBEC) Scholarship Endowment
  • Empowering Haiti through Education Fund Endowment
  • Carl and Claudia Bajema Grand Rapids Urban Schools Endowed Scholarship
In addition, Academic Services and Information Technology also assisted donors in establishing scholarships in compliance with Michigan Proposal 2.  The scholarships are as follows:
  • Thompson Working Family Scholars Program
  • University Preparatory Academy Scholarship
Also, the Division of Inclusion and Equity assisted in establishing a scholarship in compliance with Michigan Proposal 2.  The scholarship is named the First Generation Urban Schools Scholarship (this differs from the Urban Schools Scholarship available through the Office of Admissions). 

On page 6 under Addendum of Initiatives Since 2011 the report states:
 
Most recently, the Master’s in Adult Higher Education Program designed a special topics course titled, EDH 680: Minority Serving Institutions: History, Culture and Student Affairs, which serves as a “domestic study abroad” course. 
 
It should have read:
 
Most recently, the Master’s in Higher Education Program designed a special topics course titled, EDH 680: Minority Serving Institutions: History, Culture and Student Affairs, which serves as a “domestic study abroad” course. 

On page 7 under Addendum of Initiatives Since 2011 the report states:
 
In addition, the university partnered with the University Prep Academy High School in Detroit, MI, through the leadership of the Thompson Foundation.  The Foundation assisted with roughly $1.1 million dollars in tuition for these students.  The students are integrated into the university community and are employed within the university.  The Thompson Foundation also funded a working family scholarship which students earn $3,000 a year for roughly four years (which is included in the $1.1 million total). 
 
It should have read:
 
In addition, the university (specifically Academic Services and Information Technology) partnered with the University Prep Academy High School in Detroit, MI, through the leadership of the Thompson Foundation.

On page 12 under the College of Health Professions (CHP), section 4b: Organizational Learning- Community Outreach, the report states:
 
Lastly, the CHP established a health science camp that recently completed its third year.  This camp recruits from numerous community colleges that serve diverse constituencies.
 
It should have read:
 
Lastly, the CHP established a health science camp that recently completed its third year.

On page 21 under Academic Services and Information Technology, section 1a: Access and Equity – Recruitment and Retention, the report states:
 
The enrollment of students from underrepresented populations has increased as well as the university’s graduation rate.  In addition, contracts with agents were signed and negotiated to assist the university in growing its international student population.
 
It should have read:
 
The enrollment of students from underrepresented populations has increased as well as the university’s graduation rate.  While the focus of this report is on diversity-related work at the university, it may also be of interest to note that overall undergraduate enrollment has increased as well.  In addition, contracts with agents were signed and negotiated to assist the university in growing its international student population.

On page 30 under Suggestions for Future Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Work the report states:
 
The development of an Office of National Fellowships for undergraduate and graduate students could be helpful at GVSU.  This office would prepare students to apply for some of the following:
  • Luard Fellowship
  • Rhodes Scholarship
  • Truman Scholarship
  • Udall Scholarship
  • Goldwater Scholarship
  • Pickering Fellow
  • NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship
  • Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship
This suggestion should not have been included in the report as the university established the Frederick Meijer Office of Fellowships in December of 2009.

On page 31 under Suggestions for Future Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Work the report states:
 
Recruit Hispanic students from Grand Rapids and Holland, Michigan.
 
This suggestion should not have been included in the report as the Office of Admissions is working to recruit Hispanic students from Grand Rapids and Holland, Michigan
  
Establish relationships with community colleges with large Hispanic enrollments in places such as Miami, Florida; San Antonio, Texas; Dallas, Texas; Houston, Texas, and large cities in California.
 
This suggestion should not have been included in the report as the Office of Admissions examined this in the past but found that most Hispanic students attend school close to home.  Also, the Office of Admissions lack resources for this suggestions.
 
Purchase the SAT list (this is an opportunity to expand to other locations/states etc.)
 
This suggestion should not have been included in the report as the Office of Admissions already purchases the ACT minority names, National Research Center for College and University Admissions names, PSAT names, Junior SAT names, National Hispanic Scholars list, National Semifinalist Achievement list and Outstanding Transfer Students list.
 
Examine ways to involve families in the college process and provide opportunities for campus visits.
 
It should have read:
 
Consider examining ways to involve families earlier in the college readiness process (i.e. middles school) and continue to explore additional opportunities for campus visits.  (Note: The Office of Admissions routinely runs bus trips from Detroit, Benton Harbor, Holland, Flint, Gary, Chicago, and other urban areas and Financial Aid visits 30 to 40 high schools locally to speak with families about financial aid and the FAFSA.)
 
Utilize the resources of GreatSchools (www.greatschools.org)
  • Within this website, one can examine specific schools in various areas and can often view the racial population of each school in the form of a pie graph.  The website also has other very useful information like median income in the area, home values in the school district, etc.
This suggestion should not have been included in the report as the Office of Admissions has considered GreatSchools in the past and the ACT AIM is more appropriate for the University's needs.
 
The admissions staff is made up of nine females and nine males, of whom nine are White, seven Black and two Hispanic. The university may want to invest in more or additional Hispanic employees and/or hire an Asian or a Native American employee(s) to recruit students to the university.

This suggestion should not have been included in the report as the Office of Admissions has and will continue to recruit and hire professionals that represent the changing population in the U.S
 
Recruit students in parts of Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin with the highest population of Hispanic residents.
 
This suggestion should not have been included in the report as the Office of Admissions has analyzed these recruiting territories in the past.  In addition, the Office of Admissions has and will continue to work to recruit this population of students.

 

Page last modified March 24, 2014