Disciplinary Courses

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Art

Science

Social Science

Junior Seminar

Supplementary Courses

Live.Learn.Lead.

Art Courses

Spring/Summer 2018

HNR 280 02: SWS Rock History and American Culture

Schedule: Online

Kurt Ellenberger

This course will study the history of Rock and the American culture in which it developed. We will also study how Rock, in turn, influenced American and World Culture so profoundly in the 20C. We will learn about Rock from its Blues origins in the 19C in the slave populations of the deep south and its progenitors in the 20C. We will then study the early Rock pioneers (Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley) and the “British Invasion” of the 1960s as we proceed to study the development of the music into its various different styles, including Hard Rock, Art/Progressive Rock, Glam Rock, Heavy Metal, Punk Rock, New Wave, and Alternative/Indie Music. This course does not require previous knowledge of music. There will be no discipline specific content in music theory, history, or performance; however, we will introduce a small amount of rudimentary music terminology that will be taught and demonstrated. 

Fall 2018

HNR 280 02: SWS Art and Money

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: SWS & Arts

Ellen Adams, Professor

November 2013: Over the course of two evenings—a mere four hours total—New York auction houses Christie’s and Sotheby’s sold over one billion dollars’ worth of contemporary art. The sales smashed records for both living and dead artists, with hedge funders, “international trade” groups, and art dealers furiously bidding up lot after lot. Long-time art world observers proclaimed, in apocalyptic terms, the end of art for the public (museums were conspicuously missing among the buyers). Yet the sales represent the logical culmination of market forces brought to bear on the buying and selling of works of art.

These same forces are not recent developments, and this class will trace the convergence of art and money from its historical origins to the present day world of galleries, art fairs, and auctions. Focusing primarily on the 19th through the 21st centuries, we will study the production, sale, and exchange of works of art as well as the patrons, artists, and collectors who participate in this economic, social, and political form of taste-making and aesthetic valuation. Topics will include philanthropy, both local and national; public funding for art; fakes, fraud, and forgeries; museums and collecting; and the development of an international market for art.

 

HNR 280 03: Jazzin' the Culture

Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Arts

Kurt Ellenberger, Professor

This course will study the history of jazz and the American culture in which it developed and also how jazz, in turn, influenced American and World Culture so profoundly in the 20C. We will learn about jazz from its origins in the 19C in the slave populations of the deep south and its subsequent move northward from New Orleans to Kansas City, Chicago, and New York. The important style periods will be studied, including blues and ragtime, dixieland, swing, cool jazz, bebop, Latin jazz, hard bop, avant garde, fusion, European jazz, and contemporary trends. This course does not require previous knowledge of music. There will be no discipline specific content in music theory, history, or performance; however, we will introduce a small amount of very simple music terminology that will be taught and demonstrated.

Winter 2019

HNR 236 01: SWS Modern Art & Modernity

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45 pm HON 219

Requirements fulfilled: SWS & Arts

Ellen Adams, Assistant Professor

This course addresses some of the significant movements and developments in art, literature, theater, and thought between 1860 and 1960. This period witnessed a radical expansion in the definition of artistic, literary, and other cultural practices as well as a search for new modes of expression.  Debates in Europe and the United States will be discussed in relation to a historical framework of cultural changes brought about by capitalism, industrialization, war and revolution. We will consider the various meanings of modernism and will discuss a wide range of related issues, including the relationship between “high art” and mass culture; representations of sexual and racial identity; the social and political functions of cultural spaces and commentary; the evolving relationship between modern culture and its audience; and the concept of an avant-garde. Analysis of individual works of art, literature, film, music, and primary texts forms the basis of the course.

 

HNR 280 05: Rocking the Culture

Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15am HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled: Arts

Kurt Ellenberger, Professor

This course will study the history of Rock and the American culture in which it developed. We will also study how Rock, in turn, influenced American and World Culture so profoundly in the 20C. We will learn about Rock from its Blues origins in the 19C in the slave populations of the deep south and its progenitors in the 20C. We will then study the early Rock pioneers (Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley) and the “British Invasion” of the 1960s as we proceed to study the development of the music into its various different styles, including Hard Rock, Art/Progressive Rock, Glam Rock, Heavy Metal, Punk Rock, New Wave, and Alternative/Indie Music. This course does not require previous knowledge of music. There will be no discipline specific content in music theory, history, or performance; however, we will introduce a small amount of rudimentary music terminology that will be taught and demonstrated. 

 

HNR 280 14: Jazzing the Culture

Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Arts

Kurt Ellenberger

This course will study the history of jazz and the American culture in which it developed and also how jazz, in turn, influenced American and World Culture so profoundly in the 20C. We will learn about jazz from its origins in the 19C in the slave populations of the deep south and its subsequent move northward from New Orleans to Kansas City, Chicago, and New York. The important style periods will be studied, including blues and ragtime, dixieland, swing, cool jazz, bebop, Latin jazz, hard bop, avant garde, fusion, European jazz, and contemporary trends. This course does not require previous knowledge of music. There will be no discipline specific content in music theory, history, or performance; however, we will introduce a small amount of very simple music terminology that will be taught and demonstrated. 

 


Science Courses

Fall 2018 & Winter 2019

The following science sequence fulfills both the life and physical science requirements and students must take these courses consecutively. 

HNR 243 10 and 101: The Human Body in Motion I

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15 and 2:30-3:45pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Brad Ambrose, Associate Professor of Physics

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

This course is the first semester in the two-semester sequence fulfilling the General Education requirements in science for Honors students. The structure and function of human movement as well as the nature of science will be examined from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives in order to develop an appreciation for the human body.
 

HNR 244 01: The Human Body in Motion II (Winter)

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45 HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Bradley Ambrose, Professor

In this second course of a two-course sequence, students continue their study of human performance from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives. Specifically, the students themselves design, develop, and execute independent projects that extend beyond the background material covered in the first course of the sequence. To fulfill part of the course requirements, students complete an academic manuscript and a scholarly oral presentation.


Individual Life & Physical Science Options

Please choose individual courses as required. 

Life Sciences Fall 2018

HNR 242 01: Plants and People

Schedule: TR 6:00-7:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Sheila Blackman

Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.

HNR 280 08: Our Evolving World

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Gary Greer
This course explores the mechanisms of biological evolution and their application to improve human welfare.  The history of life on earth and the evolutionary processes that have generated organismal and ecological complexity are first explored.  Next, the principles of evolution are used to develop effective action for the conservation of our biological heritage, improve food production, and optimally manage our health, lifespan, and social well-being.  Finally, you will apply the lens of biological evolution to understand and contribute to solution of an environmental or social issue through student-designed investigations.

Life Science Winter 2019

HNR 242 01: Plants and People
Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Karen Amisi, Adjunct Instructor of Biology

Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.

 

HNR 245 01: Microbes and Society

Schedule: M 3:00-5:50pm HON 214

Roderick Morgan, Professor of Biology

This course addresses the fundamental nature of microorganisms, how microorganisms make us sick and how we deal with infections, and the role of microorganisms in global warming. In the course, you will learn how microbes are classified and organized and what makes a microbe infectious or not. The course will also help you understand the many positive aspects of how humans exploit microorganisms in food production, such as yogurt, beer and cheese, medicine production, such as antibiotics, and sewage treatment. We will also discuss how microorganisms have influenced human history including how they have been used in past and current warfare. Since microbes can cause tremendous suffering or provide countless benefits, after taking the course you will appreciate how microorganisms greatly affect our everyday lives.

HNR 247 01: Molecules of Life in Perspective
Schedule:
TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Debra Burg, Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences

This course is an introduction to basic biological concepts in the context of human health and disease. These concepts will provide the foundation for understanding the interplay between biotechnology and emerging strategies in health care. The impact of biotechnology on the social, economic, cultural, political and ethical aspects of society will be explored.
 


Physical Sciences Fall 2018

HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View
Schedule: MWF 10:00am-11:50am HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab
Peter Wampler

This course engages students in scientific inquiry and develops a sense of discovery of the Earth system in which we live.  We investigate the dynamic nature of Earth by studying the geologic materials that comprise the Earth and the dynamic processes which that are ceaselessly changing the shape of the Earth's surface.  We look at ways in which the science of geology affects our daily lives, and also look at how the ways in which we live can impact upon our environment.

 

 

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective
Schedule: MW 1:00-2:50pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry
This is a one-semester course in chemistry for non-science majors in the Honors program.  Concepts in science are taught in the context of major societal issues such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and energy resources for the future.  A guided-inquiry course, students learn the subject matter and develop essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, information processing, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that includes reflection on learning and assessment of performance.

 

-----OR------
Complete the following sequence to fulfill both life and physical science requirements (Students must take these courses consecutively):

HNR 243 10 and 101: The Human Body in Motion I
Schedule:
TR 1:00-2:15 and 2:30-3:45pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Brad Ambrose, Associate Professor of Physics

Edward Baum

This course is the first semester in the two-semester sequence fulfilling the General Education requirements in science for Honors students. The structure and function of human movement as well as the nature of science will be examined from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives in order to develop an appreciation for the human body.

Physical Science Winter 2019

HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View
Schedule: MWF 10:00-11:50am HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Greg Wilson, Lab Coordinator

This course engages students in scientific inquiry and develops a sense of discovery of the Earth system in which we live.  We investigate the dynamic nature of Earth by studying the geologic materials that comprise the Earth and the dynamic processes which that are ceaselessly changing the shape of the Earth's surface.  We look at ways in which the science of geology affects our daily lives, and also look at how the ways in which we live can impact upon our environment.
 

 

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective
Schedule: MW 1:00-2:50pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

This is a one-semester course in chemistry for non-science majors in the Honors program.  Concepts in science are taught in the context of major societal issues such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and energy resources for the future.  A guided-inquiry course, students learn the subject matter and develop essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, information processing, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that includes reflection on learning and assessment of performance.

 

                   

-----OR------
Complete the following sequence to fulfill both life and physical science requirements (Students must take these courses consecutively):

 

HNR 244 01: The Human Body in Motion II

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45 HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Bradley Ambrose, Professor

In this second course of a two-course sequence, students continue their study of human performance from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives. Specifically, the students themselves design, develop, and execute independent projects that extend beyond the background material covered in the first course of the sequence. To fulfill part of the course requirements, students complete an academic manuscript and a scholarly oral presentation.


Social Behavioral Science Courses

Fall 2018

ANT 204 04: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am LMH 275

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Tara Hefferan, Associate Professor

This course focuses on cultural diversity and how anthropologists attempt to understand social and cultural systems in modern populations.  Students will explore theories of culture change, patterns of kinship, and the place of religious, economic, and political institutions and go outside the classroom to explore this diversity in our community. We will explore many issues in terms of case studies from various regions of the world but the course will continually emphasize the application of these concepts in our own culture and social systems. Frequently, we will make comparisons with U.S. culture and students will be asked to bring their knowledge and experiences of culture and food systems to bear upon social issues during classroom discussion.

 

ECO 211 07: Introductory Microeconomics (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 11:30-12:45pm HON 148

Sebastian Linde, Assistant Professor

Focuses on the interactions among households, producers, and governments in market economies. Applies fundamental methods of economic analysis to topics such as consumer decision-making and welfare; producer pricing, profits, and organization; wages and income distribution; global poverty; health care and insurance; and government taxes, spending, and regulation of markets.

 

PSY 101 04: Intro Psychology (Honors Section)

Schedule:  MWF 10:00-10:50am, HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Jennifer Gross, Associate Professor

Three themes capture our quest into all things psychological.  Despite the breadth and diversity of the field, ranging from the anatomy of the eye, to forms of pathology, to psychology’s insights on user-friendly design, all of Psychology embraces the scientific study of human behavior (Theme 1).  The scientific approach offers the highest standard of evidence, which affords a powerful approach to determine the validity of commonly-made assertions (e.g., “Is watching TV violence really harmless”).  With scientific scrutiny, you can evaluate persuasive dogma.  The study of Psychology reveals how even the simplest human behavior is influenced by a multitude of forces (Theme 2).  This insight about the complexity of behavior fosters avoidance of simplistic, naïve explanations for human actions (like, “there are two kinds of people in the world—the weak and the strong; the good and the evil”).  Nothing about human behavior is this simple.  By scientifically determining answers to questions like: “Can leading questions distort eyewitness memory, is it safe to drive and talk on the phone, can stress increase my susceptibility to colds, and are there really different learning styles,” Psychology has a practical impact on everyday life (Theme 3).

 

PSY 101 10: Intro Psychology (Honors Section)

Schedule:  MWF 11:00-11:50am, HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Jennifer Gross, Associate Professor

Three themes capture our quest into all things psychological.  Despite the breadth and diversity of the field, ranging from the anatomy of the eye, to forms of pathology, to psychology’s insights on user-friendly design, all of Psychology embraces the scientific study of human behavior (Theme 1).  The scientific approach offers the highest standard of evidence, which affords a powerful approach to determine the validity of commonly-made assertions (e.g., “Is watching TV violence really harmless”).  With scientific scrutiny, you can evaluate persuasive dogma.  The study of Psychology reveals how even the simplest human behavior is influenced by a multitude of forces (Theme 2).  This insight about the complexity of behavior fosters avoidance of simplistic, naïve explanations for human actions (like, “there are two kinds of people in the world—the weak and the strong; the good and the evil”).  Nothing about human behavior is this simple.  By scientifically determining answers to questions like: “Can leading questions distort eyewitness memory, is it safe to drive and talk on the phone, can stress increase my susceptibility to colds, and are there really different learning styles,” Psychology has a practical impact on everyday life (Theme 3).

 

HNR 231 01: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Jason Crouthamel, Professor

This course will challenge your beliefs about modern society, religion, and the human condition.  The Holocaust was not something that happened in ‘another world’.  It was a crime organized by the doctors, lawyers, professors, businessman, pastors and ‘ordinary’ people.  This fact still haunts our own society today – What is the legacy of the Holocaust? What are the implications of this event? This class will explore how and why human beings can inflict such unbelievable cruelty on each other. We will also analyze the traumatic effects of the Holocaust on victims.  In addition to studying the impact of this event on Jews, the primary target of genocidal violence, this class will also address Nazi attacks on homosexuals, the mentally disabled, ‘social outsiders’ and other groups who faced annihilation.  We will study some of the seminal books on the Holocaust by leading historians, and we will closely analyze eyewitness testimonies of perpetrators and survivors, whose voices in documentaries like Shoah will serve as a central basis for discussion.  The course mixes discussion, lecture, debates and visual media to optimize the class environment.

 

HNR 231 02: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Robert Franciosi, Professor

This course will examine the Holocaust, a “watershed event” that Yehuda Bauer argues represented “something radically new” in history and that changed “human perspective.” Although we will consider the implications of this statement, our primary goal will be to gain a solid understanding of what the Holocaust was. To that end we will concentrate mostly on historical narratives and primary documents, though with our viewing of Claude Lanzmann’s epic documentary film, Shoah, and with our work on the collection How Was it Humanly Possible?, we will also consider the psychological, social, political, historical, cultural, and economic forces that affected the various groups impacted by the destruction of Europe’s Jews—the perpetrators, victims, bystanders, rescuers, and resisters. 

 

SOC 313 02: Race and Ethnicity

Schedule: MWF 10:00-10:50am HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: US Diversity and Social Behavioral Science

Jennifer Stewart, Professor

Over the course of this semester, we will examine historical and contemporary forms of racism in the US.  We will also study the social construction of race or the process by which laws, language, visual images, education, and structural positioning creates and maintains race and difference.  By examining the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in the US, we will be able to see how race is defined, experienced, and lived.  To make sense of our studies we will be emphasizing the contributions of critical race theorists, new labor historians, and other contemporary sociologists working in the area of Race & Ethnic Studies.

 

Winter 2019

ANT 204 07: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am LMH 275

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Tara Hefferan, Associate Professor

This course focuses on cultural diversity and how anthropologists attempt to understand social and cultural systems in modern populations.  Students will explore theories of culture change, patterns of kinship, and the place of religious, economic, and political institutions and go outside the classroom to explore this diversity in our community. We will explore many issues in terms of case studies from various regions of the world but the course will continually emphasize the application of these concepts in our own culture and social systems. Frequently, we will make comparisons with U.S. culture and students will be asked to bring their knowledge and experiences of culture and food systems to bear upon social issues during classroom discussion.

 

ECO 210 05: Introductory Macroeconomics (Honors Section), Hybrid

Schedule: MW 12:00-12:50 HON 148, Friday course contents will be delivered online.

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Dan Giedeman, Professor

Introduction to the study of the national and global economies. Topics include the effects of government taxation and budget deficits on economic growth; ways to alleviate unemployment, inflation and international trade imbalances; and the importance of expectations and decision-making in an uncertain world.

 

HNR 231 01: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Behavioral Science

Jason Crouthamel, Professor

This course will challenge your beliefs about modern society, religion, and the human condition.  The Holocaust was not something that happened in ‘another world’.  It was a crime organized by the doctors, lawyers, professors, businessman, pastors and ‘ordinary’ people.  This fact still haunts our own society today – What is the legacy of the Holocaust? What are the implications of this event? This class will explore how and why human beings can inflict such unbelievable cruelty on each other. We will also analyze the traumatic effects of the Holocaust on victims.  In addition to studying the impact of this event on Jews, the primary target of genocidal violence, this class will also address Nazi attacks on homosexuals, the mentally disabled, ‘social outsiders’ and other groups who faced annihilation.  We will study some of the seminal books on the Holocaust by leading historians, and we will closely analyze eyewitness testimonies of perpetrators and survivors, whose voices in documentaries like Shoah will serve as a central basis for discussion.  The course mixes discussion, lecture, debates and visual media to optimize the class environment.

 


Supplementary Honors Courses

Fall 2018

ACC 212 20: Principles of Financial Accounting (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 214

Chris Harper

Students in this course are given the tools needed to develop the ability to prepare, analyze, and interpret accounting information. Basic accounting concepts will be applied to facilitate understanding of the relationship between business activities and accounting information.  Students will develop problem solving, critical thinking, and communication skills necessary to use accounting information, form conclusions about business activities, and communicate those conclusions to others.  Accounting majors and minors who complete both Accounting 212 honors and Accounting 213 honors will be permitted to waive Accounting 240.

 

BUS 201 13 : Legal Environment for Business (Honors Section)

Schedule: M 4:00-5:15pm HON 220   *This is a hybrid course, meaning it will not meet jointly every week. See details below.*

Star Swift, Professor

Bus 201 is a law class that teaches the students the basics of law. Some of the topics are the constitution, contracts, civil and human rights, criminal law, the new digital workplace and international law.  The class will meet every week as a whole group on Tuesday nights.

MTH 201-05 Calculus 1

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:50pm MAK A2165

Lauren Keough

Requirements Fulfilled: Mathematical Sciences

Prerequisite: MTH 122 &123, or MTH 124 or assignment through GVSU Math Placement. 

Calculus is one of the great intellectual achievements of human history and significantly shapes our understanding of the world around us.  Students in this course will develop the ability to use the tools of differential calculus to study a wide range of problems.  We will create a collaborative working classroom environment so that students are led to discover many of the important concepts and develop the ability to communicate them clearly and precisely.  In addition, we will use computational tools to explore many ideas in a "hands on" way so that these ideas seem natural and intuitive.  Students completing this course will be able to smoothly move into MTH 202 (Calculus II) .

 

HST 203-06: World History to 1500 A.D.

Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 148

Steeve Buckridge, Professor

Prerequisite: WRT 150

This course will be an intensive survey and will examine specific cultures, ideas and values of human civilization from their origins in the ancient world through to the 15th century.   The aim of this course is to comprehend the development of civilizations and to examine how history and culture affects people’s effort to understand, use and survive in their environments, and how these efforts in turn, affect culture. The course incorporates both western and non-western materials, and emphasis will be placed upon the socio-cultural, economic, political and value systems of specific societies. The course format will include lectures, responses to assigned questions and group discussions. Audio-visuals such as films, slides and music will also be incorporated. Due to the vastness of World History and time frame for this course only selected  cultures and civilizations will be discussed.

Winter 2019

ACC 213 16: Principles of Managerial Accounting (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled:  Elective

Chris Harper, Assistant Professor

This course examines the use of accounting information for planning, control and decision-making in business.  Topics include product costing, cost behavior analysis, activity-based costing, budgeting, variance analysis, performance measures in a decentralized organization, pricing, relevant costs for decision-making and careers in accounting.  The course provides students the opportunity to use accounting information to solve relevant business problems. Accounting majors and minors who complete both Accounting 212 honors and Accounting 213 honors will be permitted to waive Accounting 240.

 

BUS 201 09: Legal Environment for Business (Honors Section)

Schedule: T 4:00-5:15pm HON 220   *This is a hybrid course, meaning it will not meet twice a week.*

Requirements Fulfilled: Elective

Star Swift, Professor

Bus 201 is a law class that teaches the students the basics of law. Some of the topics are the constitution, contracts, civil and human rights, criminal law, the new digital workplace and international law.  The class will meet every week as a whole group on Tuesday nights. 

 

STA 215 55: Introductory Applied Statistics (Honors Section)

Schedule: M 10:00-10:50am MAK A1171, W 10:00-10:50am MAK A2111, F 10:00-10:50am MAK A2103  

The Honors section of STA 215: Introductory Applied Statistics will cover the same statistical content as any other section, but it will include an extra component at the instructor’s discretion.  Past offerings have included the historical background behind each statistical technique, or a focus on controversial aspects of statistical methods in use today.

 

HST 203-06: World History to 1500 A.D.

Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 219

Steeve Buckridge, Professor

Prerequisite: WRT 150

This course will be an intensive survey and will examine specific cultures, ideas and values of human civilization from their origins in the ancient world through to the 15th century.   The aim of this course is to comprehend the development of civilizations and to examine how history and culture affects people’s effort to understand, use and survive in their environments, and how these efforts in turn, affect culture. The course incorporates both western and non-western materials, and emphasis will be placed upon the socio-cultural, economic, political and value systems of specific societies. The course format will include lectures, responses to assigned questions and group discussions. Audio-visuals such as films, slides and music will also be incorporated. Due to the vastness of World History and time frame for this course only selected  cultures and civilizations will be discussed.



Page last modified April 9, 2018