Foundations - Historical Analysis

Analysis of the past enables societies to collect, interpret, and share knowledge of where they have been, explore the origins of their core values, and assess how past decisions account for present circumstances In addition, analysis of the past nurtures you by providing a broader perspective of your place within time. The construction of interpretations around causation, change, continuity, and chronological thinking provide important sites of contestation. Historical analysis of the past based on primary sources creates an informed, discriminating citizenry capable of careful analysis to better inform decisions in the present.


Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain how causation, change, continuity, chronological thinking, based on comprehension of primary sources (textual, material, or both), shape historical analysis and interpretation.
  2. Evaluate a range of primary sources (textual, material, or both) as evidence of historical analysis and interpretation.
  3. Recognize and evaluate historical analysis and interpretation in a variety of secondary sources.
  4. Skill Outcome #1:
    • Written communication: Write effectively for multiple purposes and audiences; or
    • Critical thinking: Comprehensively evaluate issues, ideas, artifacts, or events before forming a conclusion; or
    • Oral communication: Effectively prepare and deliver a formal oral presentation.
  5. Skill Outcome #2:
    • Problem solving: Design and evaluate an approach to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal; or
    • Ethical reasoning: Apply ethical principles and codes of conduct to decision making; or
    • Information literacy: Identify the need for information; access, evaluate, and use information effectively, ethically, and legally.

Courses

You are required to take one course in the Historical Perspectives Foundations category.

ANT 215 — Origins of Civilization
This course examines the consequences of decisions made by our ancestors, the successes and failures of past civilizations, so that we may better understand our own behavior. Development of world civilizations is explored using historic, archaeological, and other perspectives that inform us about the past. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem-solving

CLA 121 — Greek Civilization
An introduction to major cultural accomplishments of ancient Greece. Emphasis on Greek literature, art, philosophy, and political institutions both in their historical contexts and as achievements of continuing importance in the contemporary world. Topics may vary. Skills: ethical reasoning, written communication 

CLA 131 — Introduction to Roman Civilization
An introduction to major accomplishments of ancient Rome. The course examines significant aspects of Roman political, social and cultural life, both in their primary context and in terms of their relevance to society today. Topics may vary. Skills: ethical reasoning,
written communication

EAS 201 — East Asia in the Contemporary World
Prepares students for encountering East Asia in various ways. Introduces East Asian cultures, political and economic systems, international relationships, recent developments, traditional customs and behavior patterns, differences between regions, and historical roots of some contemporary situations. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: critical thinking, ethical reasoning, oral communication 

GSI/HST 202 — History of Global Change and Social Transformation 
A historical inquiry into long-term processes of global change and social transformation. Focus is on increasing interconnectedness of human communities from the deep past to the present, including spread of cultural, market and ecological exchanges, transport and communication technologies, developing ideas of social justice, and their connections to contemporary times. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: critical thinking, ethical reasoning, oral communication 

HSC 201 — The Scientific Revolution
What are the origins of modern science? This course explores the emergence of scientific ideas and institutions during the Scientific Revolution (1450-1800) by examining how scientists built on the work of earlier thinkers, how their work was fostered and/or constrained by religion and politics, and why their ideas endured. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy 

HSC 202 — The Technological Revolution
How has technology evolved? Why has it changed? With what consequences? This course examines the development of technological systems from the 1700s to the 2000s by considering their influence on the cultural values of everyday people, their economic and environmental effects, and their shaping of our current technological society. Skills: critical thinking, information literacy 

HST 101 — Introduction to World Civilizations
This course examines the long-term trajectory of world history. Taking a global approach, students think beyond national boundaries and consider themes that bind disparate regions together, such as trade, migration, the environment, state formation, and imperialism. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, written communication

HST 102 — Introduction to European Civilizations
This course examines the long-term trajectory of European civilizations, focusing on the development of Europe and the complex interrelationships between political, economic, social and cultural aspects over time. Students may consider themes such as the emergence of nation-states, trade, migration, religion, class conflict, gender, racism, genocide, nationalism or demographic change. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy 

HST 103 — Introduction to American Civilizations
How did we get here?  Explore the long-term development of American history from precolonial origins to European colonies to a world power.  Investigate how social, cultural, political, and economic forces have shaped our lives. Topics and thematic approach will vary by section. Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity. Skills: critical thinking, ethical reasoning, information literacy 

HST 203 — World History to 1500 A.D.
Basic content and methods of history through an introductory study of world cultures before 1500 A.D. The course focuses on specific societies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Western Hemisphere, analyzing and comparing the ways in which political, economic, social, cultural, and demographic factors influenced the development of these various cultures. Required for majors. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, written communication 

HST 204 - World History since 1500
Basic content and methods of history through introductory study of world cultures from 1500 to present. Course focuses on specific societies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Western hemisphere, analyzing and comparing the ways in which political, economic, social, cultural, and demographic factors influenced the development of these various cultures. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: critical thinking, information literacy, oral communication

HST 205 - American History to 1877
The development of the United States from the Colonial Period to the end of Reconstruction with an emphasis on the role that race, ethnicity, culture, political thought, economics, and gender played in shaping American values and institutions.  Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity. Skills: ethical reasoning, written communication

HST 206 — American History Since 1877 
The legacy of Jim Crow, the impact of immigration on political systems in an urban industrial society, the quest of social, civil, racial, gender and political equality, competing economic and political thought, and the emergence and preservation of America as a world power.  Fulfills Cultures - U.S. Diversity. Skills: ethical reasoning, written communication

HST 207 — European Civilization to the Later Middle Ages
A historical survey focusing on the development of European civilization from Classical Greece to the Later Middle Ages. This course will explore the intellectual, social, religious, political, and cultural aspects of the formation of Europe. Topics include the rise and fall of Greece and Rome, and the formation of Europe. Skills: information literacy, written communication 

HST 208 — European Civilization since the Later Middle Ages
Examines major events in European history from the Later Middle Ages to the present, including social, political, economic, and cultural developments. Topics will include the Reformation and Renaissance, the Age of Revolutions, the rise of fascism and communism, the two world wars and the Holocaust, and events since 1945. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: information literacy, oral communication, written communication 

HST 209 — History and Social Studies for Elementary Teachers
Introduces the basic content and methods of inquiry of history and social studies for students who plan to teach at the PK-6 grade levels. Students will develop knowledge, understanding, and application of the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies disciplines with particular emphasis on history. Skills: critical thinking, information literacy

HST 211 — History of Islamic Civilization 
An introduction to the history of Islamic civilization and the development of its relationship with Western Europe and the United States. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy

HST 212 — India: History and Civilization
Examines the history, culture, and civilization of India from ancient to early modern period. It covers the rise and fall of civilizations, kingdoms, and dynasties. In tracing historical developments, the course emphasizes the rich and diverse culture of human experiences that have shaped a relatively unique civilization in South Asia. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: critical thinking, ethical reasoning, oral communication 

HST 230 — Latin America in World History
This course is a broad survey from the pre-Columbian period to the present. The course will focus on major issues and themes in Latin American history. Topics will include: Amerindians, conquest, slavery independence, national identity, foreign intervention, revolutions, and inequality. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication, problem solving

HST 240 — A History of East Asia to 1800 
A broad overview of East Asian political systems, social changes, economic transformation, regional relations, and cultural interaction from prehistory to 1800. Major historical events and trends along with cultural differences and interactions will be examined. Emphasis is given to China and Japan; Korea and Vietnam are also covered. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy 

HST 241 — A History of East Asia Since 1800 
A broad overview of East Asian political systems, social changes, economic transformation, regional relations, and cultural interaction since 1800. Major historical events and trends along with cultural differences and interactions will be examined. Emphasis is given to China and Japan; Korea and Vietnam are also covered. Fulfills Cultures - Global Perspectives. Skills: critical thinking, information literacy, oral communication 

MES 201 — Introduction to the Middle East
An entry-level course introducing students to the variety and complexity of the Middle East. Provides a broad view of the region from the perspective of several disciplines and is especially suitable for students having little familiarity with the region. Fulfills Cultures – Global Perspectives. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving

REL 200 — Understanding Religions in Human Experience
An interdisciplinary introduction to how religion has been understood and has shaped human experience, past and present. Students will also learn to identify and apply basic terminology, conceptual frameworks, and analytical methods in the field of religious studies. Offered fall and winter
semesters. Skills: information literacy, written communication

WGS 224 — Introduction to LGBTQ Studies
Introduces LGBTQ histories, cultures, and theoretical perspectives in the context of race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, ability, and nation. Topics include: literary and artistic expression, biological investigations, health matters, policy and politics, community life, and other issues relevant to studying gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer life. Skills: critical thinking, problem solving 



Page last modified April 15, 2022