Cultures - Global Perspectives

These courses are meant to help you understand the perspectives and ways of life of people in societies located primarily outside of the United States. Courses in this designation provide you with a basis for understanding and interpreting the variety of world cultures, institutions, societies, and challenges (e.g. discrimination, racism, inequality, environmental issues, poverty).


Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain how culture affects people’s efforts to understand, use, and survive in their environments, and how these efforts, in turn, affect culture.
  2. Explain within a cultural context the worldviews, language, or ways of life of societies, nations, regions, or people located outside of the United States.
  3. Skill Outcome #1:
    • Critical thinking: Comprehensively evaluate issues, ideas, artifacts, or events before forming a conclusion; or
    • Information literacy: Identify the need for information; access, evaluate, and use information effectively, ethically, and legally.
  4. Skill Outcome #2:
    • Collaboration: Effectively work on a team; or
    • Oral communication: Effectively prepare and deliver a formal oral presentation.

Courses

You are required to take one course in the Global Perspectives Cultures category. If you place out of a 202 language course, you may take a higher level three-credit language course to fulfill the Global Perspectives requirement. Email your name, G-number, and the course you wish to take to gened@gvsu.edu.

AAA 200 — Understanding Africa
An introduction to the theoretical, conceptual, and historical framework that has shaped the study of Africa and a multidisciplinary survey of the main topics and issues facing the African continent as a vehicle for understanding African studies and making sense of Africa’s evolution. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

AAA 300 — U.S.-Africa Relations
Examines the historical development of the relationship between the United States and Africa, and the broad range of issues — cultural, economic, political, security, and social — that condition and shape the relationship. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

AAA 302 — African Diaspora
Overview of the history and culture of African societies throughout the world and the persistence of African culture among black populations outside of Africa. Chronicle of major events in the diasporic experience. Examines ethnocultural debate, African cultural values, artistic and intellectual traditions, and cultural continua of African forms in the new world. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking 

AAA/PLS 319 — African Politics
A study of social and economic forces that shape the political processes in Africa through a combination of individual cases and general themes. Topics include precolonial and colonial politics, regional integration, democratic transitions, state collapse and violence, ethnicity,  gender and class, civil society, development, and Africa’s role in world affairs. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

AAA/ENG 337 — Contemporary Black Literature
Studies the importance and variety of literature by black authors from Africa, the Americas and/or Afro-Europe since 1975. Texts written earlier than 1975 are used to consider influential historical and/or social events, trends and themes, literary styles, innovative uses of popular culture, and/or expression of the experience of marginality. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Identity Issue. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, integration, problem solving 

ANT 204 — People and Cultures of the World
Introduces the discipline of anthropology by examining the diversity of human cultures that has been described by anthropologists over the last 100 years. The principles of anthropology are explained with examples drawn from non-Western culture. Comparisons are drawn with our own. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, ethical reasoning 

ANT 215 — Origins of Civilization
This course examines the consequences of decisions made by our ancestors and the successes and failures of past civilizations, so that we may better understand our own behavior. Development of world civilizations is explored using historic, archaeological, and other perspectives that inform us about the past. Fulfills Foundations – Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving

ANT 315 — Comparative Religions
A cross-cultural study of contemporary religions. Examines the diversity of religious meaning through the lived experiences of cultures, traditions, and sects around the world. Exposes students to anthropological interpretations of religion through a range of methods, including ethnography. Themes include symbolisms, ritual, death, shamanism, healing, magic, pilgrimage, and interfaith movements. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Identity Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

ANT 340 — Culture and Environment
Compares different adaptive strategies of cultures from around the world and seeks understanding of ethical and social values different groups have related to the environment. Attention is focused on how humans relied on cultural mechanisms in the past to adapt and change their physical and natural environment. Prerequisites: Junior standing, Fulfillment of GE Foundations - Writing, and either Historical Analysis or U.S. Diversity. Part of the Sustainability Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, oral communication, problem solving 

ANT 345 — Perspectives on Globalization
The anthropology of globalization examines the emergence of “globalized local cultures.” Students employ the ethnographic approach to understand globalization as the intensification of interconnectedness in which anthropologists learn that fundamental problems of deep and universal concern to humans everywhere will need to be addressed at local, national, and global levels. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

ARA 202 — Intermediate Arabic II: Language and Culture
Continued practice in speaking, listening, reading, writing at the Intermediate Level. Review of grammar and expansion of vocabulary. Focus on Arabic culture through authentic texts and multimedia materials. Continuation of ARA 201. Counts toward the Arabic minor and the Middle East studies minor. Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in ARA 201, or credit. Credits: 4. Skills: information literacy, oral communication 

ART 322 - Goths to Gothic: Medieval Art
A thematic examination of the arts and visual culture created between the 6th and 15th centuries in Europe and the broader Mediterranean. Explores diverse media in relation to their political, religious, and social contexts. Also considers 19th century and contemporary reception of medieval art and ideas. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking

ART 323 - Rethinking Renaissance Art
Thematic examination of the visual arts produced between 1400 and 1650 focusing on intersections between Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Topics include the artist and society, civic and domestic contexts for the arts, as well as the representation of self and community. Explores concepts of Renaissance art in later eras. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

ART 422 - Art and the Worlds of Islam
Examines the arts and material culture produced in Islamic contexts between the 7th century and the present. Themes include patronage, materials, reception, cultures in contact, plurality of meaning, as well as colonial and post-colonial circumstances. Also explores the work of contemporary artists in relation to transnational contexts. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

CHI 202 — Intermediate Chinese II: Language and Culture
Continued practice in speaking, listening, reading, writing at the intermediate level. Chinese culture introduced through authentic texts and multimedia materials. Counts toward the Chinese minor and the East Asian studies minor. Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in CHI 201. Credits: 4. Skills:  information literacy, oral communication

CHI 236 - Popular Chinese Fiction
This course is an overview of the most influential works of Chinese fiction in translation from pre-modern times to the present, focusing on the cultural messages embedded in them that have had a deep impact on Chinese culture and society today. Fulfills Foundations – Philosophy and Literature. Skills: information literacy, oral communication

CHI 323 — Late Imperial Chinese Culture
This course offers an overview of different components of Chinese civilization in the last three imperial dynasties: Yuan (1279-1368), Ming (1368-1644), and Qing (1644-1912). The course materials include fiction, drama, prose, poetry, biography and autobiography, and various forms of traditional arts. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

CHI 324 - Contemporary Chinese Culture
An introduction to contemporary Chinese popular culture. Using a variety of primary source materials, including film, television dramas, reality shows, literature, art, and artifacts, it explores popular culture's relations to social change, public spaces, the state, individual freedom, collective justice, national and social identities, and globalization. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, integration, oral communication, problem solving

EAS 201 — East Asia in the Contemporary World
Prepares students for encountering East Asia in various ways. Introduces East Asian cultures, political, and economic systems, international relationships, recent developments, traditional customs and behavior patterns, differences between regions, and historical roots of some contemporary situations. Fulfills Foundations – Historical Analysis. Skills: critical thinking, ethical reasoning, oral communication 

ECO 349 — Emerging Markets Issues*
Examines important problems in emerging markets throughout the world, such as policies to stimulate growth via international trade; foreign aid and multinational investment in transitional economics; the use of natural resources and agriculture in economic development; and the relationship of
economic development to education, health, and migration. Prerequisites: Junior standing and ECO 200 or ECO 210. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, oral communication, problem solving 

ECO 369 — International Economic Issues*
Selected topics in both international trade and international finance. Includes preferential trading arrangements such as NAFTA and the European Union; analysis of barriers to trade and arguments for and against protectionism; the influence of exchange rates on capital flows; and the relationship between international trade and economic growth. Prerequisites: Junior standing and ECO 200 or ECO 210. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

EDF 316 - Global Perspectives on Education
Globalization is changing the purposes of education around the world, both increasing competition and enhancing global citizenship. This course will examine the inter-relationship between socio-cultural contexts and education in multiple countries, the impact of globalization on educational policies and practices, and global perspectives on these emerging challenges and opportunities. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving

EGR/NRM 406 — Renewable Energy Systems: Structure, Policy, and Analysis
A survey of the technological as well as economic, societal, and public policy issues associated with renewable energy systems. Topics include generation using renewable resources such as solar, wind, hydropower, and biomass as well as advanced energy storage systems and distribution. Energy research and analysis techniques are introduced. Prerequisites: Junior standing and STA 215 or STA 220 or STA 312. Part of the Sustainability Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

ENG 204 — World Mythology
A comparative look at myths, folktales, and fairy tales and how they derive from, and work on, the mind of a culture, both socially and aesthetically. Examines these tales as works of art in their own right and also as metaphors expressing a society’s major values, themes, and preoccupations. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of GE Foundations - Writing. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

ENG/AAA 231 — Early African American Literature
Analysis and discussion of discourse primarily written by African Americans during the formative years of this nation. Emphasizes literary discourse as a means of defining African American consciousness and community, and understanding how African Americans’ communities of origin shaped African American discursive expression. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of GE Foundations - Writing. Fulfills Foundations – Philosophy and Literature. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, ethical reasoning, written communication 

ENG 355 — Teaching English Learners, PK-6
Prepares pre-service PK-6 teachers to meet the needs of English learners. Focus on how second languages are learned; the cultural, linguistic, and affective factors that influence the process; and research-based pedagogy for promoting ELs' academic language and literacy development across content areas. Field placement required. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking

FRE 202 — Intermediate French II: Language and Culture
Continued practice in speaking, listening, reading, writing at the Intermediate level. Review of grammar and expansion of vocabulary. Focus on French and Francophone culture through authentic texts and multimedia materials. Counts toward the French minor (non-education). Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in FRE 201, or credit, or appropriate placement test score. Credits: 4. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

GER 202 — Intermediate German II: Language and Culture
Continuation of GER 201. Continued practice in speaking, listening, reading, writing at the Intermediate Level. Review of grammar and expansion of vocabulary. Focus on German culture through authentic texts and multimedia materials. Counts toward the German minor (non-education).  Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in GER 201, or credit, or appropriate placement test score. Credits: 4. Skills: information literacy, oral communication

GPY 235 — Geography for a Changing World
Examines a world that is undergoing political, economic, social and environmental changes at many different spatial scales. Using geographic concepts, this course examines national, regional, and global interaction and development, and the diverse and complex processes that both hinder and help forge a global community.Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving

GPY/PA 324 — Urbanization
Examines the process of urbanization, its impact on various cultures, and its long-term sustainability. Considers the rapid urbanization in the developing countries and the dynamic growth of global urban systems, emphasizing the evolution of cities over time, space, and vastly different social, political, and cultural environments. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Sustainability Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

GPY 350 — Geopolitics, Energy, and Environment of Russia and Central Eurasia 
This course examines the unique role of Russia and Central Eurasia in the world’s energy, water, and food security and many global geopolitical of the 21st century. With its complex ethnocultural composition and vast deposits of oil, gas, coal, and uranium, this region is strategically important for the U.S. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, oral communication, problem solving 

GPY 351 — Geography of Africa
Africa is one of the most fascinating world regions, yet paradoxically one of the least known. The focus of this course is on the rich cultural (language, religion, agriculture, cities, health, economy) and physical (climate, vegetation, landforms) geographies of this vast region and how they have changed over time. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking

GPY/LAS 352 — Geography of Latin America
The growth and development of Latin America have a significant impact on most activities in North America. Examines those effects and studies the cultural and physical development of Latin America. Skills: information literacy, oral communication 

GPY 356 — The Geography, Culture and Land Use Management of Europe 
A survey of Europe’s distribution and regional interactions of physical and human resources such as climate, soils, hydrology, and coastal geomorphology, along with cultural elements such as settlement patterns, language, ideology, economic development, infrastructure evolution, industrialization, urbanization, human capital, and jurisdictional developments and the associated land use  management approaches. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

GPY 362 — Farmers, Crops, and Our Challenging Agricultural World
A geography of the world’s agricultural practices and development at different scales, from traditional methods to industrial agriculture with an emphasis on farming societies. Topics include indigenous agriculture and crop domestication, agroforestry and plantation systems, land use and rural societies, export crops, aquaculture and livestock, and drug cultivation. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, integration, problem solving 

GRK 202 — Intermediate Greek II
Readings from Homer’s Iliad or Odyssey supplemented by study of early Greek history and culture. Prerequisite: GRK 201. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

GSI 201 — (Dis)Order and (In)Justice: An Introduction to Global Studies
An interdisciplinary introduction to global studies using themes of order/disorder and justice/injustice to explore problems and issues affecting people globally. Focuses on interconnectedness of global concerns and links between the local and global, primarily from a social science perspective. Possible topics: migration, human trafficking, food security, antiglobalization movements, infectious disease. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving 

GSI/HST 202 — History of Global Change and Social Transformation
A historical inquiry into long-term processes of global change and social transformation. Focus is on increasing interconnectedness of human communities from the deep past to the present, including spread of cultural, market and ecological exchanges, transport and communication technologies, developing ideas of social justice, and their connections to contemporary times. Fulfills Foundations – Historical Analysis. Skills: critical thinking, ethical reasoning, oral communication

GSI/PLS 215— Global Migration
An interdisciplinary analysis of the global movement of immigrants and refugees and its relationship with the economy, politics, development, and culture. Students learn about migration as a key feature of globalization. Possible topics: migration history, immigration policies, border control, integration, citizenship, migrant transnationalism, diaspora, remittances, child migrants, and migration theories. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, ethical reasoning 

HSC 201 — The Scientific Revolution
What are the origins of modern science? This course explores the emergence of scientific ideas and institutions during the Scientific Revolution (1450-1800) by examining how scientists built on the work of earlier thinkers, how their work was fostered and/or constrained by religion and politics, and why their ideas endured. Fulfills Foundations – Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy 

HST 101 — Introduction to World Civilizations 
Designed to support general education goals and develop historical perspectives, this course emphasizes the comparison of selected African, American, Asian, and European civilizations from ancient times to the present, exploring the variety of activities that divide and unite human beings across cultures, time, and space. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, written communication

HST 102 — Introduction to European Civilizations 
This course examines the long-term trajectory of European civilizations, focusing on the development of Europe and the complex interrelationships between political, economic, social and cultural aspects over time. Students may consider themes such as the emergence of nation-states, trade, migration, religion, class conflict, gender, racism, genocide, nationalism or demographic change. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy 

HST 203 — World History to 1500 A.D. 
Basic content and methods of history through an introductory study of world cultures before 1500 A.D. The course focuses on specific societies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Western Hemisphere, analyzing and comparing the ways in which political, economic, social, cultural, and demographic factors influenced the development of these various cultures. Required for majors. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, written communication 

HST 204 — World History Since 1500
Basic content and methods of history through an introductory study of world cultures from 1500 to present. The course focuses on specific societies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Western Hemisphere, analyzing and comparing the ways in which political, economic, social, cultural, and demographic factors influenced the development of these various cultures. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: critical thinking, information literacy, oral communication 

HST 211 — History of Islamic Civilization
An introduction to the history of Islamic civilization and the development of its relationship with Western Europe and the United States. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy 

HST 212 — India: History and Civilization
Examines the history, culture, and civilization of India from ancient to early modern period. It covers the rise and fall of civilizations, kingdoms, and dynasties. In tracing historical developments, the course emphasizes the rich and diverse culture of human experiences that have shaped a relatively unique civilization in South Asia. Fulfills Foundations – Historical Analysis. Skills: critical thinking, ethical reasoning, oral communication

HST 230 — Latin America in World History
This is a broad survey of Latin American history from the pre-Colombian period to the present. The course will focus on major issues and themes in Latin American history. Topics will include Amerindians, conquest, slavery, independence, national identity, foreign intervention, revolutions,
and inequality. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication, problem solving 

HST 240 — A History of East Asia to 1800
A broad overview of East Asian political systems, social changes, economic transformation, regional relations, and cultural interaction from prehistory to 1800. Major historical events and trends along with cultural differences and interactions will be examined. Emphasis is given to China and Japan;
Korea and Vietnam are also covered. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, information literacy 

HST 241 — A History of East Asia Since 1800
A broad overview of East Asian political systems, social changes, economic transformation, regional relations, and cultural interaction since 1800. Major historical events and trends along with cultural differences and interactions will be examined. Emphasis is given to China and Japan; Korea and Vietnam are also covered. Fulfills Foundations - Historical Analysis. Skills: critical thinking, information literacy, oral communication 

HST 310 — Cultural and Social Topics in Non-Western History
Examines various topics in non-Western cultural and social history. Course explores a specific topic defined by the instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

HST 332 — Emergence of Modern India and South Asia
Examines the emergence of Modern India and South Asia from the 17th century to the present. Topics include tradition, modernity, imperialism, culture, religion, women and gender, migration, globalization, human rights, nationalism, Indian diaspora, and conflict and cooperation between the South Asian countries and between India and major world powers. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

HST 342 — History of Buddhism and East Asian Religions
Examines Buddhism and major religious traditions of East Asia and their modern developments through historical perspectives. Explores the visions, values, and activities of people in India, Tibet, China, and Japan, and how their religious traditions have shaped their life experiences. Studies religious interactions among East Asian countries and their indigenous traits. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Identity Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

HTM 175 — International Food and Culture
An exploration of world cultures via an examination of foods, focusing each semester on a different international cuisine. Demonstrates the ways in which intellectual, social, religious, political, economic, and geographic factors affect the development of regional cuisines. Explorations of culture and tasting of the region’s food and beverages are included. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

HTM 202 — International Tourism
Introduction to international tourism focusing on the socioeconomic effects of international tourism along with the inherent public-private interaction. International tourism is more than a set of industries, but rather an activity that encompasses human behavior, uses of resources (public and private), and interaction with other people, economies, and environments. Prerequisite: HTM 101 suggested. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking 

INT 400 — Global Visionary Leadership
This variable topics course examines the life and work of a visionary person or persons outside the U.S. whose theories and/or actions have affected deep change. The impact of these visionary ideas and actions result in paradigm shifts within global cultures, institutions, societies and worldviews.  May repeat for credit. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking

ITA 202 — Intermediate Italian II: Language and Culture
Continued practice in speaking, listening, reading, writing at the Intermediate level. Emphasis on real-life communication. Review of grammar and expansion of vocabulary. Focus on Italian culture through authentic texts and multimedia materials. Prerequisite: ITA 201 with C (not C-) or better, or permission of instructor. Credits: 4. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking 

JPN 202 — Intermediate Japanese II: Language and Culture
Continuation of JPN 201. Continued study of speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture at the Intermediate Level. Supplemented by multimedia and the Language Resource Center. Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in JPN 201. Credits: 4. Skills: information literacy, oral communication 

JPN 221 — Pre-modern Japanese Literature and Culture (to 1600)
This course explores Japanese literature and culture from antiquity to 1600. Readings will consist primarily of primary sources in English translation, including literature, history, philosophy, religion, art, and theater. No prior knowledge of Japanese is required. Skills: information literacy, oral communication

JPN 222 — Early Modern Japanese Literature and Theatre
This course explores Japanese literature and theatre during the Edo Period, from 1600 through the end of the 19th century. Readings will consist primarily of literary and theatrical works in English translation as well as history, philosophy, religion, art, etc. No prior knowledge of Japanese is required. Fulfills Foundations - Art. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication

JPN 224 — Post-World War II Japan through Literature and Film 
This course examines contemporary Japan through the lens of literature and film from the end of the Pacific War in 1945 to the present. Readings consist mainly of primary sources in English translation. No prior knowledge of Japanese is necessary. Fulfills Foundations - Philosophy and Literature. Skills: information literacy, oral communication

JPN 323 — Modern Japanese Literature and Film (to WWII)
This course examines Japan's modern period through the lens of literature and film from the Meiji Restoration in 1868 until the end of the Pacific War in 1945. Readings consist mainly of primary sources in English translation. No prior knowledge of Japanese is necessary. Part of the Identity Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving

LAS 210 — Exploring Latin America
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of the origins and development paths of Latin American and Caribbean societies, with attention to the interrelationship between these societies and the United States. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving 

LAT 202 — Intermediate Latin II
Readings in Augustan Epic Poetry, supplemented by the study of the genre, history, and culture of Augustan Rome. Prerequisite: Successful completion of LAT 201 or appropriate high school background. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

MES 201 — Introduction to the Middle East
An entry-level course introducing students to the variety and complexity of the Middle East. Provides a broad view of the region from the perspective of several disciplines and is especially suitable for students having little familiarity with the region. Fulfills Foundations – Historical Analysis. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving 

MGT 303 — International Business and Culture*
An introduction to the issues that a company will experience when doing business in a global economy. Emphasis is on the influence of culture on business practices. Topics may also include economic structures, marketing approaches, accounting and financial issues, management and organization issues, and distribution issues. Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

MGT 466 — International Management and Multinational Corporations*
A study of the managerial challenges of conducting business in a global economy. Emphasis on cultural differences and their impact on the situations and issues managers confront when working internationally. Prerequisite: Senior status or approval of instructor. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking 

MUS 218 — World Music
An exploration of non-Western music and Western folk music. Develops listening skills and ability to describe musical sounds and structures. Introduces an ethnomusicological perspective that considers music in relation to other aspects of society and culture. Fulfills Foundations – Art. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

MUS 309 — Music in Time of War
Course on the relationship between music and war.  Students will learn about a variety of war-related music, including music for organizing soldiers, recruiting, propaganda, cultural outreach, raising morale, therapy, memorial, and expression of opinions about war. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Identity Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, oral communication, problem solving

PHI 210 — Eastern Philosophy
Because the world is getting smaller, the scope of our knowledge and vision must expand. This course introduces students to major philosophies of the East, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism, through the study of classic texts. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

PHI 240 — Middle Eastern Philosophy
This course introduces students to Middle Eastern philosophy from the medieval period through the contemporary era. The course will give students a thorough understanding of what Middle Eastern philosophy is, what makes it unique, and how both medieval and modern thinkers tackle the philosophical problems of their day. Prerequisite: Prior work in philosophy or permission of instructor. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

PHI 250 — Existentialism
An investigation of a major philosophical and literary movement in the 19th and 20th century. Important existentialists include Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus. Topics include authenticity, freedom, consciousness, commitment, our relations to others and God, how emotions provide insights unavailable to reason, and the limits of philosophy. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

PHI 400 — Wisdom of the East: Advanced Topics in Asian Philosophy
Study of one or more Hindu, Buddhist, Confucian, or Taoist philosophers (The Buddha, Nagarjuna, Lao Zi, Zhuangzi, Confucius, etc.). Topics: human nature, society, and individual, moral practice, suffering and liberation, religiosity. Credits: 3. Repeatable for credit, if content differs. Skills: critical  thinking, oral communication

PLS 103 — Issues in World Politics
Analysis and discussion of contemporary issues in world politics as a vehicle for introducing core concepts in comparative politics, such as democracy, dictatorship, civil society, power, nationalism, political economy, social policy, identity politics, and development. Students will gain basic familiarity with the institutions, actors, and processes that influence world politics. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving 

PLS 211 — International Relations
This introductory course in international relations (IR) examines interactions among states and non-state actors in the international environment. Class focuses on military, economic, ethnic, and religious conflict. Topics include power, organizations, nationalism, and economic integration. Major IR theories are exemplified by current topics, such as terrorism, poverty, trafficking, and climate change. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving 

PLS 281 — Comparative Political Systems: Canada
An analysis of the socioeconomic factors which influence the political processes, through a comparison of the political systems in the United  States with Canada. Skills: information literacy, oral communication

PLS 283 — Chinese Politics and U.S. -China Relations
A historical and thematic study of Chinese politics by examining the patterns and dynamics of its political, economic, and social development, as well as its interaction with the United States. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

PLS 284 — Latin American Politics
The course analyzes the socioeconomic factors that influence political processes in Latin American countries, combining themes and case studies. Topics include theories of development, the historical role played by various political actors, and the current nature of development, inequality, democracy, and the politics of gender and race relations in the region. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking 

PSY 355 — Psychology and Culture 
Exploration of the interaction between ecological and cultural variables and psychological processes. Topics include cultural influences on perception and cognition, personality, cognitive and social development, social relations, interpersonal and intergroup behavior, and psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking 

REL 100 — Religions of the World
An interdisciplinary study of multiple world religions in their cultural, historical, and political context. Students will investigate topics including belief structures, ritual systems, sacred literature, social dimensions, and historical development of various religious traditions. The course will include identification and comparison of key aspects of religion across traditions. Fulfills one of the Foundations – Social and Behavioral Sciences. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, ethical reasoning 

REL 300 — Religions in the World Today: Theories, Methods, and Issues
This course explores the intersection of religion with human life, law, politics, and public culture, focusing on contemporary religions' roles in the secular world. Topics may include: human rights, fundamentalism, migration/immigration, social and political movements, gender/sexuality, nationalism, contemporary religious movements or phenomena, and environmentalism, among others. Part of the Human Rights Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving

REL 306 — Hinduism and South Asian Religions
Hinduism is the world’s third largest religion with approximately one billion adherents and has given birth to three other religions: Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism. This course explores the origins and development of Hinduism, examining key concepts like karma, yoga, and reincarnation in our discussion of Hindu worldviews, cultures, and practices. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Identity Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

REL 335 — Sacred Words, Global Understanding
A comparative study of sacred texts as literary masterpieces that shape and influence their respective cultural expressions and literary traditions. This interdisciplinary course will examine the multiple intersections of sacred texts with the many faces of globalization. Readings may include selections from Rig Veda, Upanishad, Bible, Qur’an, and Tao Te Ching. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Globalization Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, problem solving 

RUS 202 — Intermediate Russian II: Language and Culture
Continuation of RUS 201. Continued study of speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture at the intermediate level. Supplemented by multimedia and the Language Resource Center. Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in RUS 201, or credit. Credits: 4. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking 

SOC/WGS 350 — Family and Gender in the Developing World
A comparative examination of the impact of development on families and gender roles in third world countries. Will include consideration of general issues (e.g., factors affecting family reproduction decisions, women in the formal and informal labor force, etc.) and in-depth study of gender and family in one or more countries. Prerequisites: Junior standing and Fulfillment of GE Foundations - Writing. Part of the Identity Issue. Skills: collaboration, critical thinking, integration, oral communication, problem solving 

SPA 202 — Intermediate Spanish II: Language and Culture
Continued development of speaking, listening, reading and writing for students at the Intermediate level. Review of grammar and expansion of vocabulary. Focus on cultures of the Spanish-speaking world through authentic texts. Supplemented by multimedia and the Language Resource Center. Prerequisite: C (not C-) or better in SPA 201, or credit, or appropriate placement test score. Credits: 4. Skills: critical thinking, oral communication 

WGS 301 — Global Feminisms
This course offers a comparative analysis of local/global feminisms through history, activism, development and forms of feminism in different countries as well as an examination of the status of women in those countries as it impacts feminist activism. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Part of the Human Rights Issue. Skills: collaboration, information literacy, integration, problem solving 


*You must have completed 55 credits to enroll in 300- to 400-level Seidman College of Business courses. If you are a nonbusiness major with a 2.5 overall GPA, please email your name, G-number, course, and semester to go2gvbiz@gvsu.edu to request a permit to register. Secondary admissions criteria applies for business majors.



Page last modified April 15, 2022