Program Educational Objectives

Environmental Studies Minor

Objective 1.1: Students will integrate knowledge from multiple disciplines representing physical and life sciences perspectives, political and economic perspectives, and social and cultural perspectives on humans’ interactions with their environments.

Objective 1.2: Students will contribute to and facilitate interdisciplinary research and problem solving, through independent and collaborative work involving systems thinking and design thinking techniques.

Objective 2.1: Students will be able to use quantitative tools and techniques to analyze, implement, envision, assess, and report sustainability efforts. Examples of such tools and techniques are: geographic information systems (GIS) and other monitoring and reporting technology, common sustainability assessment and reporting frameworks, survey design and statistical analysis, and techniques of written and visual communication.

Objective 2.2: Students will be able to use qualitative tools and techniques to analyze, implement, envision, and report sustainability efforts. Examples of such tools and techniques are: creation and interpretation of surveys and interviews, and of artistic, literary, historical, and philosophical works.

Objective 2.3: Students will be able to effectively participate in and contribute to collaborative community engagement projects.

Objective 3.1: Students will develop a sensitivity to the importance of place, history, and culture through place-based learning and community collaboration.

Objective 3.2: Students will demonstrate an understanding of how the arts, humanities, and social sciences create, interpret, and analyze cultural narratives that influence humans’ interactions with their environments.

View a curriculum map showing how each course contributes to the ENS minor educational objectives.

Sustainable Food Systems Undergraduate Certificate

Student Outcome SFS-A:

Interdisciplinary Understanding: Certificate holders have integrated interdisciplinary understanding of multiple perspectives in food systems, food justice, environmental stewardship, nutrition, community.

         Objective A.1: Students will describe the impacts of sustainable food systems on society and the environment.

         Objective A.2: Students will apply practical gardening, recycling, and composting skills to projects at the GVSU Sustainable Agriculture Project campus farm site.

Student Outcome SFS-B:

Social and Cultural Perspectives: Certificate holders synthesize social and cultural perspectives with scientific findings to understand food needs of different communities.

         Objective B.1: Students will explain the factors that define community food needs.

Student Outcome SFS-C:

Evaluating Effective Practices: Certificate holders distinguish between effective and ineffective techniques and adapt them to fit different situational contexts to support local food production, distribution, and environmental stewardship for the next generation.

         Objective C.1: Students will analyze varying food advocacy efforts (production, distribution, environmental stewardship, and others) to distinguish between effective and ineffective techniques.

         Objective C.2. Students will adapt food safety best practices in food production, manufacturing and preparation to different situational contexts, such as: agriculture, food recovery projects, and commercial and/or charitable food distribution sites.



Page last modified June 7, 2018