Fall 2017

ENG 105

ENG 105: Literatures in English, Section Title: Introduction to Science Fiction

Section 05
Instructor:
MW 1:30-2:45
ASH 1320

Science fiction has often been called the “literature of change.”  Our world is constantly changing, and science fiction, more than almost any other literary genre, embraces and explores the effect of change on our society—past, present, and future.  By exploring both historical science fiction and more contemporary works, we will examine how we as a society have thought about the world around us and the changes brought about by technology, increased scientific knowledge, and a greater understanding of the complexities of being a part of a global society.

ENG 303

ENG 303: Studies in World Literature

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Brian Deyo
MW 3:00pm-4:15pm
ASH 2146

This course will consist of an in-depth study of contemporary world literature, with a particular focus on postcolonial literatures. The student will be introduced to the field of postcolonial studies, which is generally preoccupied with the histories of colonialism and imperialism—as well as their political, social, economic, and cultural legacies. While postcolonial theorists, critics, and scholars work within a variety of disciplines to approach their object of study, our approach will be predominantly literary. We’ll read and discuss literary texts to gain a greater understanding of what colonialism and imperialism are, how they operate, and how they might be resisted. The course will be especially attentive to the way postcolonial writers represent and dramatize critical issues pertaining to race, class, and gender. And, as we’ll see, all of these issues are crucially related to questions of social, economic, and environmental justice. In an age characterized by increasing social, political, and economic equality, as well as climate instability, species loss, and environmental destruction, the issues with which we’ll be concerned are of decisive importance. By studying contemporary postcolonial writing, we’ll become more intellectually, imaginatively, and feelingly attuned to the question of what it might mean to be global citizens in an era of planetary crisis.

ENG 307

ENG 307: Teaching Writing Elementary

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Janet Navarro
MWF 10:-10:50am
LSH 229

The MWF section of ENG 307 is one of my favorites because I begin and end my week with this group of students!  Mondays and Wednesdays are typically spent exploring what writing instruction looks like when we put children’s growth as authors at the center of our work as teachers.  Students tend to particularly enjoy the time we spend looking closely at samples of children’s writing.  We also explore high quality selections of children’s literature that can be used to support writing instruction as mentor texts. Fridays, we generally focus on our own writing using a writing notebook model that mirrors those often kept by elementary aged children.  Major projects include developing a unit of study, inquiry around a relevant choice topic, and a take-home final exam.  While there is no field component to this class, students are encouraged to observe and/or volunteer in classrooms where high quality writing instruction occurs as a choice topic of inquiry.

ENG 307

ENG 307: Teaching Writing Elementary

Section 02

Instructor: Dr. Janet Navarro
MW 1:30-2:45pm
EC 410

This M/W section of ENG 307 is one of my favorites because, well, ArtPrize!  For three – four weeks our classroom is literally steps away from incredible art that we use to inspire notebook writing.  When not engaged in our own writing, this class explores what writing instruction looks like when we put children’s growth as authors at the center of our work as teachers.  Students tend to particularly enjoy the time we spend looking closely at samples of children’s writing.  We also explore high quality selections of children’s literature that can be used to support writing instruction as mentor texts. Major projects include developing a unit of study, inquiry around a relevant choice topic, and a take-home final exam.  While there is no field component to this class, students are encouraged to observe and/or volunteer in classrooms where high quality writing instruction occurs as a choice topic of inquiry.

ENG 308

ENG 308: Teaching Reading the Necessary Skills

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Janet Navarro
MW 3:00-4:15pm
EC 510

The M/W section of ENG 308 is one of my favorites because we have time to read our own choice books twice a week!  Since I have not yet figured out how teachers can inspire young children to be readers if they are not readers themselves, I have a goal that every student taking ENG 308 will fall in love with reading (again).  But, do not let this scare you away.  I will show you how, and I will support your efforts.  This is one of the ways you are exposed to various reading strategies in the course.  I promise it will be fun. That said, this is also a rigorous, content-heavy course that I hope will challenge your ideas about what reading is, how people read, how reading and readers are viewed in our culture, and of course, how to informally assess and support elementary children as they develop into strong, independent readers.  Major projects include a literacy exploration, a tutoring project completed as you tutor two children in a local school, a thorough mid-term exam, and a portfolio project due at the end of the semester.

ENG 308

ENG 308: Teaching Reading the Necessary Skills

Section 04

Instructor: Dr. Janet Navarro
M 6:00-8:50pm
EC 410

The Monday night section ENG 308 is one of my favorites because we have nearly three hours each week to focus on what reading is, how people read, how reading and readers are viewed in our culture, and of course, how to informally assess and support elementary children as they develop into strong, independent readers.  That said, this weekly session works best for those who are focused, intentional, self-motivated learners.  There are evenings when a lot is going on (I will not leave you sitting in a chair for 2 hours and 50 minutes), and I think that more outside study, to put the content together, is required of students than in the MW section. Independent reading on your own time will also be required because I have not yet figured out how teachers can inspire young children to be readers if they are not readers themselves.  If you do not currently consider yourself to be “a reader,” I will help you!  It will be fun, I promise.  That said, this course is a rigorous, content-heavy course that I hope will challenge your ideas and help you establish a strong foundation for teaching reading. Major projects include a literacy exploration, a tutoring project completed as you tutor two children in a local school, a thorough mid-term exam, and a portfolio project due at the end of the semester.

ENG 309

ENG 309: Teaching Literature to Children

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Barbara Schneider
TR 4:00pm-5:15pm
LOH 178

What are the best American picture books and chapter books for children?  Who are the best authors? What are effective ways to teach them? This course prepares prospective elementary school teachers with a working knowledge of all that, plus a grounding in censorship and aliteracy.  In short, the goal of this course is to prepare GVSU students to be the best teacher-readers in their future elementary school buildings.

ENG 320

English 320: Studies in Poetry

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. James Persoon
R 6:00-9:00pm
LHH 161

This is an all-purpose course for readers and writers of poetry who wish to know more about its history and varieties and where it is heading now. The course is divided roughly into thirds. First, an overview of the major movements of the 19th and 20th centuries, from Romanticism and Modernism to language poetry and performance poetry. Second, a study of four individual poets, two of whom will be with us on Poetry Night. And third, your choice of a poet to present to us, the basis of your final project.

ENG 330

ENG 330: Studies in Fiction: Contemporary Irish Fiction

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Kurt Bullock
M 6:00pm-8:50pm
ASH 1320

Tired of reading old novels from long-dead writers? Weary of American and British literature? Then consider Contemporary Irish Fiction, the focus of this Studies in Fiction course. All fictional works will have been published since 2000 and will include young writers still in their thirties, such as Louise O’Neill, Colin Barrett, and Mary Costello. We will read recent works by more established authors, too, such as Claire Keegan, Sebastian Barry, Colum McCann, and Emma Donoghue, as well as tried-and-true authors and Booker Prize winners (British equivalent to the Pulitzer Prize in America) Anne Enright, Roddy Doyle, and John Banville. You will encounter authors in this class you will not find in any other course in our department, fiction that you will be hard-pressed to find in any bookstore or Amazon search, and narratives that are guaranteed to make a lasting impression upon you. Your context will be the history and culture of Ireland, fraught as it has been with British colonization, the ongoing ‘Troubles’ in the north of Ireland between Catholic and Protestant factions, and the ‘Celtic Tiger’ economic boom in the 1990s that transformed Ireland into an emerging star in the European Community. You will find no leprechauns, nor will you hear refrains of “Danny Boy.” What you will discover is a wealth of quality, cutting-edge fiction from a country that has produced such writers as Jonathan Swift, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, and W. B. Yeats in the distant past.

ENG 330

ENG 334: Multicultural Lit. for Children and Young Adults

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Patricia Bloem
TR 1:00pm-2:15pm
LHH 205

 

ENG 364

ENG 364: Sociolinguistics

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Kathryn Remlinger
TR 11:30am-12:45pm
LHH 102

This course examines the relationship between language and society. Sociolinguistics is based on the idea that language varies and changes according to social factors—that language is a mirror of society. Our study will investigate regional dialects of American English; social varieties of English that are affected by class, gender, ethnicity, and race; language attitudes; how the media reflect and reinforce these attitudes; how and why language changes; and how language use reflects ideologies about certain dialects, accents, languages, and groups of speakers. In short, we’ll see that language not only reflects but also affects our social world.

During the semester we will study sociolinguistic concepts and theories, and we will put them into practice by conducting research and analyzing data. Our course will be very “hands-on.” Through our investigation we will consider a variety of questions: Why and how does language vary and change? What are the social meanings of language, even individual linguistic features, and how do these meanings emerge? Why do people have such strong attitudes about language and language use? How do we perform our identities with language and how are these “performances” recognized? How do multilingual speakers choose which language to use? How does language reflect social class and region? What are the sociolinguistics of sign languages? Do society and culture shape language, or vice versa? Does language shape our beliefs and attitudes? How is the study of sociolinguistics significant to our everyday lives?

ENG 380

ENG 380: Literature of the Holocaust

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Robert Franciosi
TR 10:00am-11:15am
ASH 2130

Are there subjects beyond literature’s reach? Experiences which language cannot adequately—and ethically—represent? Elie Wiesel once argued that “a novel about Auschwitz is either not a novel, or it is not about Auschwitz.” This paradoxical statement expresses the dilemma faced by those who engage the Holocaust through imaginative literature. In this course we will read a range of texts which face these challenges to the literary imagination: from Elie Wiesel’s searing testimony in Night to Charlotte Delbo’s poetic prose in Auschwitz and After, from Ida Fink’s luminous short fiction in “A Scrap of Time” to works by poets who confront the argument that “to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.”

Students from the various English emphasis areas—literature, elementary or secondary education—will complete term projects relevant to their fields. Students from other disciplines, such as History, Social Studies, Human Rights, etc., are also welcome.  Note: The course fulfills Category C (International Literature) or D (Approaches to Literature) in the English curriculum.

ENG 340

ENG 380: Refugee Literature

Section 02

Instructor: Dr. Patricia Bloem
W 6:00pm-8:50pm
ASH 1320

Worldwide political upheavals of the last few decades have brought suffering, migration, and refugee status to millions of displaced peoples.  While the literature of refugees is marked by journeys of alienation and loss of and struggle for identity, it is also known for amazing storytelling.  Through a variety of texts and films, this course will explore how authors portray the hopes and fears of exiled peoples. We will look at common themes in refugee and immigration literature and explore the cultural and political context for the texts.  Priority will be given to refugee and immigration stories from the Middle East, Mexico and the Central American and Caribbean regions, and East Africa.

ENG 382

ENG 382: Literature and the Environment

Section 01
Instructor: Dr. Brian Deyo
MW 1:30pm-2:45pm
LHH 122

In this course we’ll be studying literary representations of the environment. This means we’ll be examining human relations with—and attitudes toward—the nonhuman world via literary texts. We’ll engage with a diverse set of literary genres, including creative non-fiction, poetry, the essay, the short story, and the novel. We’ll also examine how and why representations of the natural world vary throughout history. As we’ll see, as human relations with the environment change, the environment changes as well—which in turn ought to necessitate changes in our conception of it, not to mention our understanding of our role, status, and place within it. Indeed we live in a moment whereby the combined effects of human agriculture, industry, and technology have managed to produce cataclysmic change in the earth’s physical, chemical, and biological processes—change on an order of magnitude that may be irreversible, possibly even imperiling the survival of the human species. As many of the authors we’ll be reading powerfully suggest, the natural world is, in a manner of speaking, communicating with us. Now more than ever it seems that humans need to collectively adapt to an increasingly volatile and unpredictable world. By studying literature, our goal is to become more intellectually, imaginatively, and (perhaps most important) feelingly attuned to the question of what it is (or might mean) to be human in an age of planetary crisis.

ENG 461

ENG 461/WGS 461: Language and Gender

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Kathryn Remlinger
MW 3-4:15pm
LSH 134

Language and Gender is a linguistics course that examines gendered language behavior. Questions that we will consider include how is language used to express gender and sexual identity? What is the role of language in constructing gender and sexuality? In conveying gender and sexuality stereotypes? In encoding and reinforcing bias in favor of, or against, a particular gender or sexuality? In the process of studying these phenomena, we will see how linguists seek evidence to demonstrate claims of gender differences in language behavior, in the performance of gender and sexuality identities, and in the construction of gender and sexuality bias in language.

Throughout the course we will examine a variety of approaches to language, gender, and sexuality. Our investigation will focus on linguistic analysis and will include how social elements such as age, ethnicity, race, class, and sexuality affect the relationship among language, gender, and sexuality, as well as how cultural elements such as values, attitudes, and beliefs affect behaviors and perspectives about those behaviors. We will examine the role of gender and sexuality in a variety of contexts, across cultures, and from a range of texts and spoken language situations, including, but not limited to, the classroom, workplace, and media. Our study will be "hands on" in that we'll apply our knowledge of feminist linguistic theories and research methods to design, conduct, and analyze research that we collect from our everyday lives.

ENG 495

ENG 495: Literature and Language (Capstone)

Section 01

Instructor: Dr. Ashley Shannon
TR 10:00am-11:15am
LHH 122

This course will be a culminating experience for all English majors. Students will reflect on their experience as English majors, create a senior project, and present their findings at a departmental conference. Prerequisites: English foundation courses and senior standing.

ENG 324

ENG 495: Capstone

Section 03

Instructor: Dr. Rachel Anderson
M 6:00 – 8:50 pm
LHH 122

This is (one of) the final courses you will take as an English Major at Grand Valley State University.  As a “capstone,” this course will enable you to “cap” your major by producing two pieces of writing that will let you use all the knowledge and skills you have gained throughout your major.  Specifically, you will write a reflective essay that describes you academically and a long research paper on a topic of your choice.  By the end of this course, you should have two documents – one that you can adapt to all sorts of situations that ask for you to describe yourself professionally and another that shows you have experience with planning and carrying out a large project from start to finish. Both of these are valuable as you move into the world beyond your bachelor’s degree!



Page last modified September 18, 2017