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Strategic Plan for Grand Valley State University

Context For Planning

GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2021

The Strategic Planning Context

Grand Valley State University has developed a highly successful approach to education and a unique niche among comprehensive universities over recent decades. In the 2016-2021 iteration of the Strategic Plan, the University will deepen and extend its current approach -- teaching, learning, scholarship and connection -- and improve its outcomes in educating students and contributing to society.

The Grand Valley approach is distinctive in that, even as a large, complex university, it continues to offer its students the rich experiences that are characteristic of the liberal education tradition. Dedication to that tradition informs every one of the university's wide range of undergraduate and graduate academic programs, including disciplinary and interdisciplinary degree levels up to professional/clinical doctorates. Students gain the essential skills and perspectives born of a liberal education, complemented by contemporary topics of the same general and transferable value: sustainability, global understanding, digital literacy, design thinking, concepts of inclusion and human rights, and other areas suitable to integrative, inquiry-based, experiential learning.

Grand Valley intends to maintain a stable annual student population of 24,000 to 26,000 undergraduates and graduates through 2021, as well as to offer the combination of degrees that led the Carnegie Foundation to classify the university among the nation's "Masters Large" institutions.

Grand Valley focuses on student success, defined narrowly as the ability of all students to accomplish their higher education goals in a timely manner and attain key performance milestones. More broadly defined, successful students will attain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they require to be lifelong learners and productive, contributing members of society. By making the choice to attend Grand Valley, these graduates will be prepared with every intellectual and experiential advantage as they pursue their future goals.

The institution will attain even higher levels of community connectedness, maintain exceptional levels of community support, and sustain a strong commitment to community service by students, faculty, staff, and administration. The university community will be renowned for its contributions to Grand Rapids, West Michigan, the State of Michigan, the United States, and the world.

Through generous donor support, strong fiscal stewardship, and ongoing credit worthiness, Grand Valley will maintain the A+ rating from Standard and Poor's it has enjoyed over the last 10 years. The university will sustain this stable foundation as an affirmation of the high value it places on fiscal stability and strength. Grand Valley will continue to use its resources to offer challenging and relevant learning and scholarship with support of students at the center of all of its activities.

Grand Valley will maintain its distinctive reputation as a large university with a small college feel where students receive personalized attention in small classes as well as customized convenient academic and career services. Students' futures will remain on Grand Valley State University's center stage.

These commitments logically preclude common pathways taken by many universities which reach Grand Valley's size and academic complexity. In specific terms, Grand Valley will not reduce its emphasis on student-centered teaching and learning by pursuing classification as a "research university" or adding medical or law programs to its degree offerings. Neither will it reduce its commitment to liberal education or liberal arts and sciences degrees, believing that deep knowledge born of the study of one or more academic disciplines, along with opportunities for developing the crucial, transferable skills and perspectives characteristic of a humanistic liberal education will best prepare students for a rapidly changing world and uncertain future. Grand Valley will maintain its NCAA Division II status in women's and men's athletics and continue to sustain the highest standards of excellence for its student athletes.

How this plan contributes to student success

Grand Valley's Strategic Plan 2016-2021 is focused on ensuring this institution is well prepared to provide all students with the resources and supports they require to accomplish their higher education goals in a timely manner, attain the key performance milestones needed for their future success, and secure the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to be lifelong learners and productive, contributing members of society. This plan is designed to promote every students persistence, educational attainment, academic achievement, personal advancement, and holistic development, including preparation for a productive, meaningful life beyond degree completion.

The key outcomes of higher education demonstrated as most likely to promote and sustain student success - personal validation, self-efficacy, a sense of purpose, active involvement, reflective thinking, social integration and self-awareness - have driven this plan's development, including its attention to providing well-qualified personnel at all levels, current technologies, safe and comfortable buildings and grounds, and a strong fiscal foundation to meet every student's needs from 2016 through 2021.

Moving forward in a changing environment

Although the rapid pace of change makes it impossible to predict the future, the same rapid pace makes planning for the future essential. Grand Valley cannot anticipate exactly what its graduates will need to know and do to achieve success in 2021, but the institution is certain they will require a basic foundation of knowledge and skills, as well as the ability to acquire new information and competencies and surmount unfamiliar challenges, using technologies and tools that very probably did not exist during their pursuit of undergraduate or graduate training on its campuses.

The university is comfortable making plans for the work it must undertake and complete in the six years ahead to ensure all students at every level are successful. Since 1960, Grand Valley and its graduates have grown and prospered through periods of significant change and uncertainty. The institution is confident the Strategic Plan 2016-2021 will play an instrumental role in its ability to maintain its momentum and thrive, no matter what lies ahead.

The strategic plan as a living document

The GVSU Strategic Plan 2016-2021 is a substantive document that represents the institutions best ideas for promoting and sustaining student success in the future. As such, it is a conceptual document that can be - and should be - updated as new opportunities and challenges develop internally and externally, in Allendale, Grand Rapids, West Michigan, Michigan, the United States, and the world. Because change is a constant in higher education, this Plan will require constant review, regular monitoring and ongoing modification to remain optimally relevant and useful for resource allocation, budgeting and the assessment of institutional progress. It has been developed with these needs in mind as a living document - one that is expected to change as Grand Valley State University and the students it enrolls change throughout the six-year period of its implementation.

Organization of the Strategic Plan

This plan is organized by four strategic priority areas that establish the focus of Grand Valley's improvement efforts between 2016 and 2021 and five institutional outcomes that describe those efforts' intended results. These priority areas and institutional outcomes provide a framework for conceptualizing the measurable changes toward which the university community will work and toward which its resources will be prioritized for the period 2016 - 2021.

The university's strategic priority areas for the period are to actively engage learners at all levels; further develop exceptional personnel; ensure alignment of all institutional structures and functions; and enhance the institution's image and reputation. The key institutional outcomes Grand Valley expects to achieve through the concerted efforts of its stakeholders in each strategic priority area:

Grand Valley will pursue and attain many additional outcomes during this period in pursuit of its mission, including diversification and management of its enrollment; reduction of time to graduation; increase in graduation rates; management of costs enhanced affordability; and the launch of innovative, entrepreneurial initiatives. These outcomes are fundamental to the functioning of a modern university; they have long been integral to Grand Valley's identity and institutional prosperity and to the continued success of the undergraduate and graduate students it serves. Most of these were prioritized in previous strategic plans and have been attained. The university is committed to maintaining its forward momentum in these areas and sustaining its currently high level of effort to ensure they continue to be achieved, as it works on the new priorities of this plan.

Within the framework created by 2016 - 2021 strategic priorities and institutional outcomes, specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-limited (SMART) objectives represent key changes Grand Valley is committed to pursuing to achieve the five institutional outcomes within the four strategic priority areas over the six-year period. The institution's budgeting and assessment activities will be closely aligned with these strategic priority areas, institutional outcomes, and objectives.

Mission

Grand Valley State University educates students to shape their lives, their professions, and their societies. The university contributes to the enrichment of society through excellent teaching, active scholarship, and public service.

Vision

Grand Valley State University demonstrates its commitment to providing an inclusive learning environment where all students can explore new directions, find their niches, and develop skills for life and productive careers. Grand Valley is known for increasingly innovative and outstanding teaching, recognized scholarship, significant community engagement, and excellent stewardship of its resources. Our university inspires and equips students to be active life-long learners and global citizens. Grand Valley strives to be a model public university shaping leaders for success.

Value Statement

At Grand Valley State University, the primary focus is on the success of students. To that end, the principles of liberal education permeate all programs and areas of study. This broad educational perspective provides students with the general knowledge and transferable skills necessary to positively influence their communities, their professions, and the broader world.


The institution is characterized by and known for its superior student-centered teaching and learning. Students acquire new knowledge and explore its application through artistic expression, scholarly activity, and active engagement in a variety of communities - to students we are a big university with a small college feel.

Our mission, vision, and strategic outcomes reflect the seven core values that define students, faculty and staff members. These core values provide a foundation and framework for all of Grand Valley's decision-making processes. We use them as a touchstone in developing the strategies and tactics that lead to the attainment of the institutional outcomes and strategic priority areas and objectives of our strategic plan. We translate our values into actions institution-wide; they are reflected in the policies, practices, and assessments we implement every day. These core values are described as follows:

EXCELLENCE

Grand Valley State University values excellence in all aspects of its enterprise. Our students' levels of performance in learning, scholarship, and community service; our stewardship of resources; our regular assessment and refinement of instructional and operational processes; and our shared dedication to excellence compel us to strive for exemplary and responsible outcomes in all that we do. Within our academic community, we individually and collectively celebrate our successes and the difference our commitment to excellence makes to individuals and communities in West Michigan, the state, the nation, and the world.

INTEGRITY

Grand Valley State University values honesty, fairness, and openness in its actions, transactions, and communications. Our emphasis on integrity compels us to respect and teach the fundamental tenets of a liberal education which remain central to our identity and reputation. We moreover value the incorporation of ethics into critical thinking and decision making institution-wide. The value we place on integrity underscores our intention to be trustworthy, dependable, and adhere to legal and regulatory requirements; we aspire to set an example for others in our words and actions. Our stakeholders and the public can count on Grand Valley to make wise decisions and carry them out transparently and with fidelity to the university's mission and vision for its future. As members of the Grand Valley community we hold ourselves accountable to each other, the institution, and the broader public that we serve.

INQUIRY

Grand Valley State University values inquiry, which encourages the lifelong pursuit of knowledge to improve the human condition and expand our understanding of the world. Consistent with our historical commitment to liberal education, we invest our resources to promote intellectual growth, creativity, scholarship, and critical thinking in our students, our faculty and staff, and the communities we serve. We promote global education and an internationalization of our curriculum that celebrates and encourages intellectual exploration, open discourse, and the unfettered expression that characterizes the academy. We celebrate and promote freedom of speech as foundational to the creation and dissemination of knowledge in every discipline. We are committed to learning as a means of preparing individuals for academic success, meaningful careers, and exemplary community service.

INCLUSIVENESS

Grand Valley State University values all identities, perspectives, and backgrounds and is dedicated to incorporating multiple voices and experiences into every aspect of its operations. We believe that diversity competencies are an intellectual asset and that a range of thoughtful perspectives and a commitment to open inquiry strengthens our liberal education tradition. We recognize that the long-term viability of the institution depends upon anticipating and meeting the needs of emerging constituent groups, especially our changing student body. Therefore, the institution seeks to include, engage, and support diverse groups of students, faculty and staff members, as well as community members. Grand Valley is committed to strengthening our living, learning, and working environment by recognizing and removing the barriers to full participation and providing a safe, inclusive, vibrant community for all.

COMMUNITY

Grand Valley State University values its connections to, participation with, and responsibility to local communities, West Michigan, the state, the nation, and the world. We value the collaboration of faculty members, staff members, and students with external partners in addressing mutual interests and community needs. The university offers the communities it serves resources and inspiration in their own lifelong pursuit of knowledge. Faculty and staff members are encouraged to contribute their expertise and service working in partnership with communities. Students are encouraged to take part in various service learning and volunteer opportunities in their communities and abroad. To foster and expand these community connections, the institution and its members promote, value, and honor diverse perspectives.

SUSTAINABILITY

Grand Valley State University values the guiding principles of sustainability in helping to meet the current needs of our faculty members, staff members, and students without compromising the needs and resources of future generations. We are committed to working with our community partners to create a sustainable future for our university, our community, our region, our state, our nation, and the world. We model applied sustainability best practices in our campus operations and administration, education for sustainable development, student involvement, and community engagement by promoting social responsibility, practicing fiscal responsibility, and encouraging environmental stewardship. We provide our students with excellence in education for sustainable development by imbedding theory, systems-oriented thinking, and service learning into our curricular and extracurricular programs.

INNOVATION

Grand Valley State University encourages and appreciates innovation. We value entrepreneurship and integrative interdisciplinary collaboration that solves local, regional, and global problems and advances the common good. We strive for the development of innovative products, systems, and services that contribute to improvements in the wellbeing of individuals and our world. We trust that scholarship and the new knowledge it produces are worthy of our investments in their creation and proliferation. We manage our resources and structure our university to encourage new ideas, creativity in all its forms, and novel approaches to answering the most important and challenging questions of our time.

Strategic Priorities, outcomes, and key objectives

Strategic Priority Area 1: Actively engage learners at all levels.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 1.A.1

At least 90% of undergraduate students participate in two or more other high-impact learning experiences prior to graduation, in addition to supplemental writing skills and capstone courses.

Baseline

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) for 2013 showed student participation in high-impact courses at 58%.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
In the 2016 NSSE survey, 61% of GVSU seniors indicated participating in two or more high-impact experiences, which is a 3% increase over 2013.

Objective 1.A.2

At least 95% of graduate students participate in at least two high-impact learning experience prior to graduation.

Baseline

90% excluding the norm of capstone, thesis, dissertation and oral and written exams, baseline levels of participation by graduate students. Summer 2015 Graduate Studies.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
According to the Graduate School, over 90% of graduate students participate in two or more high impact experiences.

Objective 1.A.3

A strategic plan will be developed for student retention, persistence and completion including goals that are ambitious but attainable and appropriate to GVSU’s mission, student populations, and educational offerings.

Baseline

A comprehensive plan for student retention, persistence and completion is not available as a single document.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
Even though this objective was not added to the strategic plan until January of 2017, the Enrollment Development Planning and Assessment Committee (EDPAC) has been in the process of developing this plan since December 2016. The plan is in development and should be finalized during the 2017 year.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 1.B.1

GVSU's diversity of student, faculty, staff, and administration increases by 18% to reflect the populations of West Michigan.

Baseline

Baseline diversity of combined faculty, staff, and administrators in 2014-15 is 83% non-Hispanic white.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
At the end of 2016, diversity at GVSU was 81.9% non-Hispanic white. There was an improvement of 1.1% in diversity at GVSU from 2015 to 2016. There is still a 4.5% difference to equal the population demographics of West Michigan.

Objective 1.B.2

Retention rates between freshman and sophomore years and sophomore and junior years for first-generation and other non-traditional undergraduate students meet or exceed the retention rates of traditional undergraduate students.

Baseline

1-year retention (2013 cohort) First Generation: 78.4% Not First Generation: 86.2% Non-White: 80.6% White: 83.7% 2nd-year retention (2012 cohort) First Generation: 89.3% Not First Generation: 93.0% Non-White: 86.3% White: 92.7%

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
Since tracking the 2013 cohort as the baseline, progress has been made in realizing this objective through the 2016 year. First year and second year retention rates of first generation students continues to trail the retention rates for non-first generation students, however, the gap in rates has improved. First year retention rates of non-white students continues to trail the retention rates for white students, however, unlike with first generation students, the gap in rates has not improved.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 1.C.1

GVSU maintains communication with 95% or more of its alumni via print materials and with 72% or more of its alumni via email.

Baseline

Baseline for 2014-2015 for printed materials is 94% and 69% via email.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
By the end of 2015, the Alumni Relations office had e-mail or mail addresses on 86.61% of our alumni population.

Objective 1.C.2

At least 10% of academic courses incorporate community-based learning experiences.

Baseline

Fall of 2014, 2.3%.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
According to data collected for the 2016 President’s Honor Roll report (using 2015 data), there were 432 courses out of 9,550 total course sections (or 4.5%) that included community-based learning experiences.

Objective 1.C.3

A strategic plan will be developed for use of additional locations/regional campuses including, but not limited to, goals for program offerings and student enrollment.

Baseline

A comprehensive strategic plan for use of additional locations/regional campuses does not currently exist in a single document.

Progress

2016 Status
Not Yet Initiated
This objective was added to the strategic plan in January of 2017. Work will begin on establishing a steering committee and developing this plan in 2017.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 1.D.1

Global learning is a requirement in all undergraduate majors.

Baseline

Fall 2014 is 63% at level 3 out of 5 levels, with 5 at the highest (immersion) level.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
Work continues across campus to infuse global learning into all undergraduate majors

Objective 1.D.2

At least 93% of faculty members regularly use electronic course management tools, such as Blackboard, in their teaching.

Baseline

89% of faculty indicated either daily or weekly use of Blackboard in their teaching according to a GVSU faculty survey conducted winter 2016.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
In fall 2016, 1,732 of 1,842 instructors (94%) accessed at least one course in Blackboard during the semester.

Objective 1.D.3

At least 60% of faculty members use state-of-the art instructional methods in their teaching.

Baseline

47% of faculty members use state-of-the-art instructional methods in their teaching according to a GVSU faculty survey conducted winter 2016.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The baseline for this objective was established through surveying faculty in winter 2016. Therefore, further assessment was not conducted in 2016. It is planned to conduct follow-up assessment of progress made on this objective in 2018.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 1.E.1

The number of externally funded undergraduate student scholarships increases by at least 50% from its 2015 level to at least 571 scholarships.

Baseline

Winter 2015 Student Scholarships level is 381.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
As of December 31, 2016, of the 470 externally funded scholarships at GVSU, 418 were focused on undergraduates, a 10% increase from the baseline value.

Objective 1.E.2

The institution's total scholarship endowment increases by at least 45% to $52,750,000.

Baseline

As of Dec. 31, 2015, $36,400,000 of the university endowment was designated for scholarships.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The corpus of the endowments for scholarships at GVSU had increased to $39,300,000, an 8% increase over the prior year baseline value of $36,400,000, by December of 2016 keeping us on track towards our goal by 2021.

Objective 1.E.3

Grand Valley provides at least 75 pass-through scholarships annually, providing annual financial support for students of $700,000 or more.

Baseline

Averaged from 54 scholarships a year to 70 a year over the past five years.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
As of December 31, 2016 the number of donor funded pass-through scholarships had increased to 119.

Objective 1.E.5

An average of 27 or more credit hours is earned by undergraduate students each year.

Baseline

Year 2013-14 is 25.3 credit hours

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The average credit hours earned by full-time undergraduate students in 2016 was 26.8. This is a slight increase from the baseline amount, which indicates some progress has been made.

Strategic Priority Area 2: Further develop exceptional personnel.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 2.A.1

25% or more of faculty completes training in developing and implementing high-impact student learning experiences.

Baseline

Fall 2014, 10%.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
Each of the colleges continues to provide opportunities and resources to faculty in order to ensure competency in implementing high-impact experiences for students.

Objective 2.A.2

At least 58% of credit hours are taught by tenure stream faculty, balanced by non-tenure lines of "practitioner/scholars" in appropriate fields who bring knowledge application to the learning milieu.

Baseline

Fall 2014, 54.2% by tenure stream faculty.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The proportion of credit hours taught by tenure stream faculty was 53.1% for fall 2016, which was a decrease from fall 2015 (53.6%), but a slight increase over the baseline value.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 2.B.2

Orientation for all new employees includes intercultural training and development.

Baseline

Fall 2014, 50%.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
New Faculty Orientation (over 125 participants) in summer 2016 received a training module from the Division of Inclusion and Equity. The Human Resources Office and the Pew Faculty Teaching and Learning Center, along with the Social Justice Education Director, are working with faculty governance on a proposal for future training. The same is happening for staff through the Human Resources Office.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 2.C.1

At least 70% of faculty members participate in one or more external professional relationships.

Baseline

62.6% of faculty members participate in one or more external professional relationships according to a winter 2016 GVSU faculty survey.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The baseline for this objective was established through surveying faculty in winter 2016. Therefore, further assessment was not conducted in 2016. It is planned to conduct follow-up assessment of progress made on this objective in 2018.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 2.D.1

Assessment of the scholarship of discovery, application, integration and teaching practices is fair, aligned with University criteria within all colleges, and consistent for all tenure stream faculty members.

Baseline

The assessment of scholarship, application, integration and teaching practice across all university units for tenure stream faculty does not uniformly meet these characteristics in Winter 2016.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
During the 2016-17 academic year, the UPRC developed over a dozen ideas to improve implementation and/or policy in order to achieve this objective.

Objective 2.D.2

Assessment of the scholarships of discovery, application, integration and teaching is consistent across all graduate programs.

Baseline

The assessment of scholarship, application, integration and teaching practice across all graduate programs for faculty is not presently uniform as of winter 2016.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
During the 2016-17 academic year, the UPRC developed over a dozen ideas to improve implementation and/or policy in order to achieve this objective.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 2.E.1

At least 75% of faculty and 75% of staff participate in professional development to expand, enhance or extend their competencies and capabilities within the context of the responsibilities of their positions.

Baseline

56% of faculty participate in professional development training to help develop or implement high impact student experiences in curricular or co-curricular activities, according to a winter 2016 GVSU faculty survey. Baseline Fall 2014 for staff is 50-55%.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The baseline for this objective was established through surveying faculty in winter 2016.

Objective 2.E.2

The amount of external support and grants to promote faculty and staff scholarship increases by at least 7.5%.

Baseline

Baseline for FY 2014, $22.4 million

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
The amount of grants reported by the Office of Sponsored Programs, within the Center for Scholarly and Creative Excellence, was $21.59 million for the 2016 year, an increase of 9.3%.

Objective 2.E.3

The extent to which faculty members' performance promotes excellence in teaching, learning, and scholarship is assessed uniformly and utilized to assign and evaluate their workloads across the institution.

Baseline

The assessment of scholarship, application, integration and teaching practice across all university units for tenure stream faculty is not uniform and is not used uniformly to evaluate workloads as of winter 2016.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
Consistent with Objective 2.D.1 and Objective 2.D.2, the work to address this objective is the same.

Objective 2.E.4

The University will have succession plans in place outlining leadership transition needs and processes.

Baseline

The university currently has succession plans in place in specific offices, including the Human Resources Office, but do not have them in all divisions.

Progress

2016 Status
Not Yet Initiated
This objective was added to the strategic plan in January of 2017. Work will begin on establishing succession plans in 2017.

Strategic Priority Area 3: Ensure the alignment of institutional structures and functions.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 3.A.1

Enrollment capacity in high demand programs (e.g., health professions and STEM disciplines) expands to accommodate larger numbers of highly qualified applicants.

Baseline

Fall 2014 student enrollment in health professions and STEM programs with limited capacity was 1,315.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
The enrollment in health professions and STEM programs with limited capacity in fall 2016 was 1,372 students, a 4.3% increase.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 3.B.1

All university systems and policies ensure inclusiveness and accessibility.

Baseline

A review of all university systems and polices will be conducted to serve as a baseline for improvement in 2016, with the objective to be reached by 2021.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
This objective is complicated in that there are many policies. We have started to inventory the policies and will start with the Grand Valley Manual.

Objective 3.B.2

At least 90% of the GVSU community report high levels of equity as characteristic of the institutional climate.

Baseline

Responses from the 2011 Campus Climate Survey show that 60% of respondents report high levels of equity as characteristic of GVSU's institutional climate.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
This is establishing a new baseline. Since the source of data for this objective comes from the Climate Survey, we needed to establish a question with the same language

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 3.D.1

The General Education Quality Improvement Initiative fully achieves its expected outcomes.

Baseline

The Quality Initiative for Higher Learning Commission is in progress and is scheduled for completion in 2017.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
There were nine goals for the QI that were all accomplished. The final report to the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) is scheduled to be presented to campus constituencies during winter 2017 semester, presented to the Board of Trustees at the April 2017 board meeting, and submitted to HLC in May 2017.

Objective 3.D.2

At least 30% of undergraduate courses are offered in innovative approaches and formats, such as hybrid, online and competency-oriented.

Baseline

Baseline for undergraduate courses for Fall 2014, 6%.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
During the 2016-17 academic year, 8% of undergraduate courses were offered as hybrid or online. Information Technology has created and facilitated more than 65 seminars and training opportunities for faculty related to best leveraging technology in teaching and learning. This includes the delivery of the Foundations of Online and Hybrid Course Development where over 130 faculty have been certified to teach distance learning courses in the past year and a half.

Objective 3.D.3

At least 30% of graduate courses are offered in innovative approaches and such as hybrid, online and competency-oriented.

Baseline

Baseline for graduate courses for Fall 2014, 25%.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
For the 2016-17 academic year, 31% of graduate courses were offered as hybrid or online.

Objective 3.D.4

At least 15% of faculty integrate the institution's art collection into their curricula and use it in their instructional activities.

Baseline

8.6% of faculty integrate the institution's art collection into their curricula and use it in their instructional activities, per a GVSU faculty survey in winter 2016.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The baseline for this objective was established through surveying faculty in winter 2016. Therefore, further assessment was not conducted in 2016. It is planned to conduct follow-up assessment of progress made on this objective in 2018.

Outcome E: Grand Valley strategically allocates its fiscal, human, and other institutional resources.

Objective 3.E.1

GVSU maintains a transparent financial budgetary reporting and implementation process that operates with integrity and includes faculty governance and leadership structures, as indicated by faculty understanding of the budgetary process (targeted increase of 10% over baseline).

Baseline

In a winter 2016 GVSU faculty survey, 29.2% of faculty indicated an understanding of the process by which budgetary decisions affecting their unit are made.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The baseline for this objective was established through surveying faculty in winter 2016. Therefore, further assessment was not conducted in 2016. It is planned to conduct follow-up assessment of progress made on this objective in 2018.

Objective 3.E.2

GVSU fully implements structures to support innovative initiatives. Selected areas for Responsibility Centered Management is an example of one such strategy.

Baseline

Currently less than 100%.

Objective 3.E.3

GVSU has a well-established reputation for the wellness of students, faculty and staff at all levels, for example, earning and/or maintaining recognition a one of America's Healthiest Employers.

Baseline

GVSU has not received national recognition in this area. Received recognition by State of MI.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
In 2016 Grand Valley signed on to the Partnership for a Healthier America, Healthy Campus Initiative and Healthy Campus 2020 national initiatives, and earned silver status for the national Exercise is Medicine campaign at the ACSM Annual Meeting in Boston, MA. In December, the University joined 164 colleges and universities across the country that are designated as Bicycle Friendly Universities (BFU), including fellow silver awardees, Michigan State University and University of Michigan.

Strategic Priority Area 4: Enhance the institution's image and reputation.

Outcome A: Grand Valley's learning environment is personal, challenging, and transformational, supporting excellent academic programs and co-curricular opportunities.

Objective 4.A.1

GVSU is ranked in the top 20% of Public Regional Universities in the Midwest by a rating system aligned with the institution's goals and values.

Baseline

GVSU ranks in the top 31% based on 2014 IPEDS data

Progress

2016 Status
Substantial Progress
GVSU ranks in the top 23% based on 2015 IPEDS data, making a significant jump over the two-year period, and just short of the target of 20% for this objective.

Outcome B: Grand Valley is diverse and inclusive.

Objective 4.B.1

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 3.7 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 4.7 or above for reputation, as rated by Metro Detroit general public of color.

Baseline

2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 3.6 pts.; Reputation 4.6 pts.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A marketing plan was implemented in 2016 by Institutional Marketing, and an assessment study to determine progress made will be conducted in 2018.

Objective 4.B.2

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 6.0 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 6.0 or above for reputation, as rated by West Michigan general public of color.

Baseline

2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 6.0 pts.; Reputation 6.0 pts.

Objective 4.B.3

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 4.0 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 4.7 or above for reputation, as rated by Metro Detroit prospective students of color.

Baseline

2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 3.8 pts.; Reputation 4.6 pts.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A marketing plan was implemented in 2016 by Institutional Marketing, and an assessment study to determine progress made will be conducted in 2018.

Objective 4.B.4

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 5.6 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 5.9 or above for reputation, as rated by West Michigan prospective students of color.

Baseline

: 2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 5.6 pts.; Reputation 5.9 pts.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A marketing plan was implemented in 2016 by Institutional Marketing, and an assessment study to determine progress made will be conducted in 2018.

Outcome C: Grand Valley has mutually beneficial relationships, partnerships, collaborations, and connections with local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 4.C.1

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 3.5 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 4.8 or above for reputation, as rated by Metro Detroit general public.

Baseline

2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 3.4 pts.; Reputation 4.7 pts.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A marketing plan was implemented in 2016 by Institutional Marketing, and an assessment study to determine progress made will be conducted in 2018.

Objective 4.C.2

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 5.5 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 5.8 or above for reputation, as rated by West Michigan general public.

Baseline

2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 5.4 pts.; Reputation 5.8 pts.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A marketing plan was implemented in 2016 by Institutional Marketing, and an assessment study to determine progress made will be conducted in 2018.

Objective 4.C.3

At least 80% of faculty, staff, and students believe GVSU is committed to community engagement.

Baseline

71.8% of faculty agree that GVSU is committed to community engagement per winter 2016 GVSU faculty survey.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
The baseline for this objective was established through surveying faculty in winter 2016. Therefore, further assessment was not conducted in 2016. It is planned to conduct follow-up assessment of progress made on this objective in 2018.

Objective 4.C.4

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 4.3 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 4.9 or above for reputation, as rated by Metro Detroit prospective students.

Baseline

2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 4.2 pts.; Reputation 4.8 pts.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A marketing plan was implemented in 2016 by Institutional Marketing, and an assessment study to determine progress made will be conducted in 2018.

Objective 4.C.5

Grand Valley's ratings achieve 5.8 or above on a 7-point scale for familiarity and 5.7 or above for reputation, as rated by West Michigan prospective students.

Baseline

2015 Institutional Image Research Survey; 7 pts. ordinal scale; Familiarity 5.8 pts.; Reputation 5.7 pts.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
A marketing plan was implemented in 2016 by Institutional Marketing, and an assessment study to determine progress made will be conducted in 2018.

Outcome D: Grand Valley supports innovative teaching, learning, integrative scholarly and creative activity, and the use of new technologies.

Objective 4.D.1

Effective technologies are integrated into every function and structure across the institution.

Baseline

In 2013, IT implementation was above the median on 24 of 49 indicators across 7 functional domains.

Progress

2016 Status
Substantive Progress
The University is continually investigating new technologies across the institution. Information Technology (IT) has pursued several modifications to Blackboard including deploying a new version of Blackboard Collaborate Ultra and the Blackboard Student mobile application as well as investigating Blackboard Ally for accessibility.

Objective 4.D.2

At least 30% of the institution's graduate degrees are ranked among the top five in their discipline within Michigan.

Baseline

23% of GVSU's graduate programs were ranked in the top 5 in the State of Michigan based on data from the U.S. News and World Report rankings for 2015.

Progress

2016 Status
Minimal Progress
Of GVSU’s graduate programs, 24% are ranked in the top five within the state of Michigan.

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