MAREC, partners outline roadmap for community solar projects in W. Michigan

Date: August 6, 2013

Originally Publish on MiBiz.com on August 4, 2013
By: Joe Boomgaard

Building off a successful effort in the Traverse City area to create a community-based solar energy collective, a group in the Muskegon and Grand Haven area wants to bring a similar approach to developing solar energy systems on the lakeshore.

The four-part community solar workshop, co-sponsored by Grand Valley State University’s Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center (MAREC) and the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association, wrapped up last week in Muskegon.

The goal of the sessions was to create a roadmap for actually implementing a community solar project that meets the needs of communities on the lakeshore, said Arn Boezaart, director of MAREC.

“There’s a growing interest in the development of community solar as an alternative to individual solar and rather than each person putting solar panels on their roof and all that goes with it,” Boezaart said. “We’re poised in this region to seriously explore how we might put some community solar together.”

Boezaart said he and others in the community have started very preliminary discussions with potential partner organizations to facilitate the development of a project with an ambitious goal of getting it started within six months.

“There’s lots of acreage where community solar can be done, but it presents its share of regulations and utility-related issues,” he said. “But we have people signed up to work to make it happen.”

The group is currently working to identify key stakeholders and prime locations in the region where the solar project could be installed.

- See more at: http://mibiz.com/news/energy/item/20803-marec-partners-outline-roadmap-for-community-solar-projects-in-west-michigan#sthash.hOdu1ar4.dpuf

Building off a successful effort in the Traverse City area to create a community-based solar energy collective, a group in the Muskegon and Grand Haven area wants to bring a similar approach to developing solar energy systems on the lakeshore.

The four-part community solar workshop, co-sponsored by Grand Valley State University’s Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center (MAREC) and the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association, wrapped up last week in Muskegon.

The goal of the sessions was to create a roadmap for actually implementing a community solar project that meets the needs of communities on the lakeshore, said Arn Boezaart, director of MAREC.

“There’s a growing interest in the development of community solar as an alternative to individual solar and rather than each person putting solar panels on their roof and all that goes with it,” Boezaart said. “We’re poised in this region to seriously explore how we might put some community solar together.”

Boezaart said he and others in the community have started very preliminary discussions with potential partner organizations to facilitate the development of a project with an ambitious goal of getting it started within six months.

“There’s lots of acreage where community solar can be done, but it presents its share of regulations and utility-related issues,” he said. “But we have people signed up to work to make it happen.”

The group is currently working to identify key stakeholders and prime locations in the region where the solar project could be installed.

- See more at: http://mibiz.com/news/energy/item/20803-marec-partners-outline-roadmap-for-community-solar-projects-in-west-michigan#sthash.hOdu1ar4.dpuf

Building off a successful effort in the Traverse City area to create a community-based solar energy collective, a group in the Muskegon and Grand Haven area wants to bring a similar approach to developing solar energy systems on the lakeshore.

The four-part community solar workshop, co-sponsored by Grand Valley State University’s Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center (MAREC) and the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association, wrapped up last week in Muskegon.

The goal of the sessions was to create a roadmap for actually implementing a community solar project that meets the needs of communities on the lakeshore, said Arn Boezaart, director of MAREC.

“There’s a growing interest in the development of community solar as an alternative to individual solar and rather than each person putting solar panels on their roof and all that goes with it,” Boezaart said. “We’re poised in this region to seriously explore how we might put some community solar together.”

Boezaart said he and others in the community have started very preliminary discussions with potential partner organizations to facilitate the development of a project with an ambitious goal of getting it started within six months.

“There’s lots of acreage where community solar can be done, but it presents its share of regulations and utility-related issues,” he said. “But we have people signed up to work to make it happen.”

The group is currently working to identify key stakeholders and prime locations in the region where the solar project could be installed.

- See more at: http://mibiz.com/news/energy/item/20803-marec-partners-outline-roadmap-for-community-solar-projects-in-west-michigan#sthash.hOdu1ar4.dpuf

Building off a successful effort in the Traverse City area to create a community-based solar energy collective, a group in the Muskegon and Grand Haven area wants to bring a similar approach to developing solar energy systems on the lakeshore.

The four-part community solar workshop, co-sponsored by Grand Valley State University’s Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center (MAREC) and the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association, wrapped up last week in Muskegon.

The goal of the sessions was to create a roadmap for actually implementing a community solar project that meets the needs of communities on the lakeshore, said Arn Boezaart, director of MAREC.

“There’s a growing interest in the development of community solar as an alternative to individual solar and rather than each person putting solar panels on their roof and all that goes with it,” Boezaart said. “We’re poised in this region to seriously explore how we might put some community solar together.”

Boezaart said he and others in the community have started very preliminary discussions with potential partner organizations to facilitate the development of a project with an ambitious goal of getting it started within six months.

“There’s lots of acreage where community solar can be done, but it presents its share of regulations and utility-related issues,” he said. “But we have people signed up to work to make it happen.”

The group is currently working to identify key stakeholders and prime locations in the region where the solar project could be installed.

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