LAS Courses

LAS 210 - Exploring Latin America
The indigenous, European, and African cultures forming Latin American and Caribbean civilization are examined through the multidisciplinary lenses of the humanities, the social sciences, and the sciences. Attention is also given to U.S. Latino cultures and to the interrelationship between Latin America and the United States. Fulfills one of the Foundation - Social and Behavioral Sciences and Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives. Offered every semester. Credits: 3

LAS 320 - Model Organization of American States (MOAS)
The Model Organization of American States (MOAS) General Assembly is a simulation of the General Assembly of the OAS, the 55-year-old regional multilateral organization of the United Nations. In LAS 380-MOAS, students learn about the history of inter-American relations, the countries of Latin America, the OAS, and the protocol needed to effectively create, present, and discuss proposals to resolve the hemisphere's most urgent problems. Credits: 3

LAS/HST 374 - Revolution in the Americas
Men and women make history, sometimes through gradual, passive means and sometimes through sudden, active means. In the Americas, both categories of history-making have been common. This course explores international relations in the hemisphere by comparing revolutionary and evolutionary processes of change from Tierra del Fuego to the Northwest Territories. Dual listed with HST 374. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Offered winter semester. Prerequisites: LAS 210. Credits: 3

LAS 378 - Contemporary Latin American Literature
A survey of Latin American literature of the past three decades, in English translation, taking in a variety of nations, regions, and cultures, including Afro-Latin and indigenous voices. Genres to be studied include the novel, the short story, poetry, dramas, testimonial narrative, speeches, folklore, and film. Dual listed with ENG 378. Offered winter semester of even-numbered years. Prerequisites: LAS 210. Credits: 3

LAS 399 - Independent Studies
Before registering, students must arrange for supervision by a Latin American Studies faculty member and submit a contract (available from the LAS coordinator) specifying the topic and scope of the study. Ordinarily no more than three credits of LAS 399 may count toward the minor. Instructor approval prior to registration. Offered every semester. Credits: 1 to 3

LAS 475 - Latinos in West Michigan
Surveys the dynamic yet little-known world of Latinos in the region and guides students through a research project documenting their experiences, achievements, and challenges. Students learn and apply field research and interviewing skills to produce and present original reports on local Latino individuals and issues. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Offered winter semester of odd numbered years. Prerequisite: LAS 210. Credits: 3

LAS 490 - Latin American Studies Internship
Supervised work experience in a Latin American Studies-related field, initiated by the student, who must prepare a proposal in consultation with a faculty advisor and a worksite supervisor. The student will submit a final report and both the worksite supervisor and the faculty advisor will evaluate the internship. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: Nine hours of LAS-related coursework and permission of the program coordinator. Credits: 1 to 3

Fall 2015 Course Offerings

LAS 210 Exploring Latin America

An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Latin American studies in which students learn about the histories and cultures of this diverse region, its varied paths of political and economic development, its relations with the United States, and Latin American migration that has made the Latino/a population the largest minority group in the US. A required core course for the LAS Minor and fulfills General Education’s Social and Behavioral Sciences Foundation and World Perspectives requirements.

Section 1: Professor Andrew Schlewitz, Tue/Thu 8:30-9:45am, ASH 1117

Section 2: Professor Michael Huner, Mon/Wed 1:30-2:45pm, LHH 101

 

LAS 380 Human Rights in Latin America

An interdisciplinary exploration of the development of human rights in Latin America, with a focus on regimes indicted for human rights violations during the Cold War, and subsequent efforts to reform repressive political systems and resolve difficult questions of how to define and enact justice. Counts as an elective for the Latin American Studies minor.

Section 1: Professor Andrew Schlewitz, Tue/Thu 1:00-2:15pm, ASH 2113

 

ANT 330: Ethnology of Indigenous Latin America

A survey of native cultures of North, Central and South America, including examples from ethnographic writing, documentary film and indigenous media. We will explore the idea of what it means to be “indigenous” from the perspectives of anthropologists, contemporary indigenous people, and national governments. We will investigate how indigenous Latin Americans continue to redefine what it means to be “indigenous” in their ongoing struggles for autonomy and self-representation. Counts as an elective towards the Latin American Studies minor.

Section 1: Professor Michael Wroblewski, Mon/Wed/Fri, 11:00-11:50pm, LSH 226

 

CFV 376 Latin American Cinema

A survey of the growing, vibrant world of cinema in Latin America. Students will view and analyze representative films as works of art and examine them as cultural, historical, political, and economic products that characterize and reveal diverse perspectives from significant film-producing countries in Latin America. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies, and counts as an elective towards its minor.

Section 1: Professor Tony Perrine, Tue/Thu 11:30-12:45pm, MAK-D-1229

 

HST 330 Early Latin America

A survey of Latin American history, from the time of indigenous peoples prior to European contact and conquest to the independence movements of the early 1800s. Among a variety of topics, students address questions of how and why Europeans conquered indigenous peoples such as the Taínos, Aztecs, and Incans, of the impact of African slavery on the region, and how slaves adapted or resisted their enslavement, and of the significance of 17th century Sor Juana, perhaps the first feminist in the Americas. This course carries SWS credit and is cross-listed with Latin American Studies, and counts as an elective towards its minor.

Section 1: Professor David Stark, Mon/Wed/Fri 11:00-11:50am, MAK-D-1125

 

Winter 2016 Course Offerings

LAS 210 Exploring Latin America

An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Latin American studies in which students learn about the histories and cultures of this diverse region, its varied paths of political and economic development, its relations with the United States, and Latin American migration that has made the Latino/a population the largest minority group in the US. A required core course for the LAS Minor and fulfills General Education’s Social and Behavioral Sciences Foundation and World Perspectives requirements.

Section 1: Professor David Stark, Mon/Wed 3:00-4:15pm, LOH 164

Section 2: Professor José Lara, Mon/Wed/Fri 10:00-10:50am, HON 219

 

LAS 320 Model Organization of American States

A course that prepares a delegation of GVSU students to participate in a simulation of the Organization of the American States—a week-long international event in Washington DC in which students role-play an OAS member state, negotiate and deliberate inter-American policies on topics such as terrorism, community economic development, environmental sustainability, human rights, and democratization. Counts as an elective for the Latin American Studies minor.

Section 1: Professor Andrew Schlewitz, Tue/Thu 2:30am-3:45pm, LHH 101

 

LAS 373 Latinos in West Michigan

An historical and contemporary survey of a fast-growing population in West Michigan. Students will explore the demographic and cultural diversity of the regional Latino/a community, and address matters of social identity, acculturation, political participation, and economic status. The course gives students the option of writing an original research paper, or performing a service learning project. LAS 373 is as a General Education US Diversity and Identity Issues course, and counts as an elective towards the Latin American Studies minor.

Section 1: Professor Andrew Schlewitz, Tue/Thu 11:30am-12:45pm, CON 214

 

HST 375 The History of Mexico

A survey of the history of a country too many of us little about, from the ancient Mayan and Aztec civilizations to three hundred years of Spanish rule prior to gaining its independence in the early 19th century. A country that experienced one of most significant revolutions in early 20th century global history, and which has grown to be the 11th most populous nation in the world and the US’s third largest trading partner. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies, and counts as an elective towards its minor.

Section 1: Professor David Stark, Mon/Wed/Fri 11:00-11:50am, MAK-D-1141