Lab Safety

Corrosive Materials

 What are corrosive materials?

Corrosives are chemicals that can cause damage or irritation to tissue that it comes in contact with.  Some can even cause damage to metal.  They can come in solid, liquid or gas form and are often strong acids, bases or dehydrating agents.

  • Corrosive gases-- are readily absorbed into the body through skin contact and inhalation.
  • Corrosive liquids-- are frequently used in the laboratory and have a high potential to cause external injury to the body.
  • Corrosive solids-- cause delayed injury. Because corrosive solids dissolve rapidly in moisture on the skin and in the respiratory system, the effects of corrosive solids depend largely on the duration of contact.

How should I handle corrosive materials?

  • Always wear proper safety goggles, gloves, lab coat and closed toe shoes
  • Always add acids or bases to water (not the reverse)
  • Liquid corrosives should be stored below eye level
  • Finish dispensing one material and close lid before dispensing another
  • If the chemical has any inhalation hazards, handle under a fume hood
  • Decontaminate the area after use by flushing with large amounts of water

 What do I do if I spill a corrosive?

  • Alert others around you of the spill
  • If the material gets on your skin or eyes, flush with water and seek medical attention if there is any question to the severity of harm
  • Use the proper spill control materials determined by the lab

 What are some examples of corrosive materials?

 

ORGANIC ACIDS

ORGANIC BASES

INORGANIC ACIDS

Formic Acid

Ethylenediamine

Hydrofluoric Acid

Acetic Acid (Glacial)

Ethylimine

Hydrochloric Acid

Propionic Acid

Tetramethylethylenediamine

Hydrobromic Acid

Butyric Acid

Hexamethylenediamine

Hydriotic Acid

Chloroacetic Acid

Trimethylamine aq. soln.

Sulfuric Acid

Trichloroacetic Acid

Triethylamine

ChromergeTM

Acetyl Chloride

Phenylhydrazine

No-ChromixTM

Acetyl Bromide

Piperazine

Chlorosulfonic Acid

Chloroacetyl Chloride

Hydroxylamine

Sulfuryl Chloride

Oxalic Acid

Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide

Bromine Pentafluoride

Propionyl Chloride

 

Thionyl Chloride

Propionyl Bromide

ELEMENTS

Tin Chloride

Acetic Anhydride

Fluorine (gas)

Tin Bromide

Methyl Chloroformate

Chlorine (gas)

Titanium Tetrachloride

Dimethyl Sulfate

Bromine (liquid)

Perchloric Acid

Chlorotrimethylsilane

Iodine (crystal)

Nitric Acid

Dichlorodimethylsilane

Phosphorus

Phosphoric Acid

Phenol

 

Phosphorus Trichloride

Benzoyl Chloride

 

Phosphorus Tribromide

Benzoyl Bromide

INORGANIC BASES

Phosphorus Pentachloride

Benzyl Chloride

Ammonium Hydroxide

Phosphorus Pentoxide

Benzyl Bromide

Calcium Hydroxide

 

Salicylic Acid

Sodium Hydroxide

 

 

Potassium Hydroxide

ACID SALTS

 

Calcium Hydride

Aluminum Trichloride

 

Sodium Hydride

Antimony Trichloride

 

Hydrazine

Ammonium Bifluoride

 

Ammonium Sulfide

Calcium Fluoride

 

Calcium Oxide

Ferric Chloride

 

 

Sodium Bisulfate

 

 

Sodium Fluoride

Page last modified December 2, 2010