Junior Seminar

Winter 2015

JUNIOR SEMINARS

 

HNR 311 01: Problem Solving for Sustainable Solutions through System Analysis
Schedule: TR 1:00 -2:15pm HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspective

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy
This course will examine a variety of problem solving techniques which can be used across disciplines and which support a sustainable approach to seeking solutions. The range of professions will included business, education, health care, and politics. Participants will learn how to identify, use and develop isomorphic strategies and tools to address presented problems.

 

HNR 311 02: The European Union

Schedule: TR 11:30 am– 12:45 pm  LSH 227

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspective

John Constantelos, Professor of Political Science

An examination of the history, economics, politics, and policies of the European Union and its twenty-eight member states.  Topics include the euro crisis, EU-US relations, EU enlargement, immigration issues, and economic, social, environmental, and security policies.  In April, students will participate in the Midwest Model EU, an intercollegiate simulation that meets for three days on the campus of Indiana University, in Bloomington, IN.

 

HNR 311 03: SWS Scandalous Literature

Schedule: MW 6:00-7:15pm HON 219

David Eick, Professor

Readers aghast, books publicly lacerated and burned by the executioner, authors and publishers threatened with the death penalty for sedition and irreligion--many masterpieces of Old Regime French literature sparked heated controversy when they were first published. This course focuses on texts originally deemed offensive or dangerous for their experimentations with linguistic and literary conventions, exploration of new modes of feeling, questioning of religious and political orthodoxy, and representations of desire. Four weeks will be devoted to a Reacting to the Past game, “The Enlightenment in Crisis: Diderot’s Encyclopédie in a Parisian Salon.”

 

HNR 311 05: Hollywood & the Holocaust
Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15 HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, Philosophy & Literature, and SWS
Robert Franciosi, Professor
For most Americans the Holocaust’s enormity only became evident in the spring of 1945, when celebratory images of Nazi Germany’s defeat were accompanied by horrific footage from the liberated concentration camps. What has been termed “American Holocaust consciousness” was first prompted, then, and continues to be renewed, by our national passion for moving images—on the screen, the tube, or the lcd display. This course will trace America’s evolving understanding of the Holocaust by considering the way films and television programs, two pillars of our mass culture, have shaped that knowledge for millions of Americans. Organized chronologically, the seminar will examine how particular American works have reflected or prompted Holocaust awareness. Students will also set those understandings within the larger cultural dynamic of American society between 1945 and the present.

Structure
This seminar will adopt a structure common to many GVSU science courses—two hours of lecture/discussion, complemented with three hours of lab, i.e., film viewing. Class will meet on MW for fifty minutes, but also gather on Thursday nights for three hours to screen films. Because of this significant time commitment, course reading requirements will be less than in a typical junior seminar, though the writing expectations will remain at the SWS level.

 

HNR 312 02: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy
This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

 

HNR 312 03: Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies 

Schedule: TR 8:30- 9:45pm HON 219
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, U.S. Diversity, and SWS

Gordon Alderink, Associate Professor of Health Professions
This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.

 

HNR 312 04: Sex, Power and Politics
Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

Karen Zivi

 

HNR 312 05: SWS The Terror of Monotheism

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 148

Jeremiah Cataldo, Professor

This course analyzes the ideological and material formation of monotheistic religious identities, historical and modern, and how those identities restrict forms or types of social engagement with the surrounding world. It starts with this basic hypothesis: monotheism, in its different forms, is a product of a contest for authority that begins in the material world.

 

HNR 312 06: Music, Culture, and Aesthetics

Schedule: W 6:00-8:50pm

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity
Kurt Ellenberger, Professor

This course will examine music as it intersects with and helps define culture in present-day America (where culturally-diverse genres coexist and cross-pollinate in a surprising manner), and contrast this with similar developments during pivotal points in the last 500 years. We will look at “art music” and popular music in many of their forms and examine them through readings from scholarly and popular writings. Aesthetics will function as a means of identifying embedded cultural values that transcend genre, thus illuminating our understanding of music in a broader societal context.

 

HNR 313 01: SWS Lost Generation

Schedule: Online
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar

Sue Swartzlander, Professor of English

"It was a place where the very air was impregnated with the energies of art."
- Thomas Wolfe

"Was it fun in Paris? Who did you see there and was the Madeleine pink at five o'clock and did the fountains fall with hollow delicacy into the framing of space in the Place de la Concorde and did the blue creep out from behind the Colonades of the Rue de Rivoli through the grill of the Tuileries and was the Louvre grayand metallic in the sun and did the trees hang brooding over the cafes and were there lights at night and the click of saucers and the auto horns that play DeBussey-I love Paris. How was it?"

-Zelda Fitzgerald

"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris . . . then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."

-Ernest Hemingway

 If you were a writer, artist, or musician in the roaring 20's, Paris was *THE* place to be. Sign on for a journey back in time to a magical city that inspired such creative geniuses as James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Andre Breton, Jean Cocteau, ee cummings, Gertrude Stein, Man Ray, Igor Stravinsky, Pablo Picasso, Sergei Eisenstein,  Josephine Baker, and Isadora Duncan. We will read a variety of literary texts and "little magazines", view contemporary photographs, paintings, and films, and listen to music of the jazz age.

If you have an interest in modern literature, music, art, dance, film, photography, literary cafes, or the roaring twenties, this is the junior seminar for you. So, don't be a flat tire, be a darb and learn more about this ritzy time in this swanky city. Twenty-three skiddoo now to sign up for this whoppee that will be not only the bee's knees but the cat's meow as well!

 

HNR 313 02: SWS Religion and Science of Origins

Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 220
Kelly Clark, Professor
Primitive peoples, requiring an explanation for thunder, postulated Zeus or Hadad; Aeolus or Vayu were thought to control the winds, while Tialoc or Chiuta brought on the rain. There was no end of alleged deities in charge of reproductive success: Famian, Njambi, Ruhanga, Xesiovo, Ison, and Unkulunkulu, to name just a few. The great Aristotle called upon the Unmoved Mover to do some heavy planetary lifting. Are the gods scientific hypotheses that stand or fall by how well they explain the data? With the development of the reproductive sciences, meteorology, the principle of inertia, and the law of gravity, these explanatory gods have fallen by the intellectual wayside. Is religion in a battle with other scientific theories concerning, most fundamentally, the origins of this or that? If so, is religion destined to lose its battle with science as science explains this and that? We will examine the claims of the Abrahamic traditions about the origins of the world and life and the relationships of such claims to scientific theories on the origin of the universe, life, humans, morality, and even the gods themselves.

 

 

HNR 313 03: SWS Designing Social Ventures

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 219

TBD