Honors Courses

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Art

Science

Social Science

Junior Seminar

Supplementary Courses

Live.Learn.Lead.

Art Courses

Some Honors students take a Foundational Interdisciplinary sequence that does not fulfill the art requirements. In order to cover this requirement, we offer the following Honors Art Courses

Fall 2017

HNR 280 02: SWS Art and Money

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: SWS & Arts

Ellen Adams, Professor

November 2013: Over the course of two evenings—a mere four hours total—New York auction houses Christie’s and Sotheby’s sold over one billion dollars’ worth of contemporary art. The sales smashed records for both living and dead artists, with hedge funders, “international trade” groups, and art dealers furiously bidding up lot after lot. Long-time art world observers proclaimed, in apocalyptic terms, the end of art for the public (museums were conspicuously missing among the buyers). Yet the sales represent the logical culmination of market forces brought to bear on the buying and selling of works of art.

These same forces are not recent developments, and this class will trace the convergence of art and money from its historical origins to the present day world of galleries, art fairs, and auctions. Focusing primarily on the 19th through the 21st centuries, we will study the production, sale, and exchange of works of art as well as the patrons, artists, and collectors who participate in this economic, social, and political form of taste-making and aesthetic valuation. Topics will include philanthropy, both local and national; public funding for art; fakes, fraud, and forgeries; museums and collecting; and the development of an international market for art.

 

HNR 280 10: Jazzing the Culture

Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Arts

Kurt Ellenberger

Description Coming soon. 

Winter 2018

HNR 236 01: SWS Modern Art & Modernity

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 218

Requirements fulfilled: SWS & Arts

Ellen Adams, Professor

This course addresses some of the significant movements and developments in art, literature, theater, and thought between 1860 and 1960. This period witnessed a radical expansion in the definition of artistic, literary, and other cultural practices as well as a search for new modes of expression.  Debates in Europe and the United States will be discussed in relation to a historical framework of cultural changes brought about by capitalism, industrialization, war and revolution. We will consider the various meanings of modernism and will discuss a wide range of related issues, including the relationship between “high art” and mass culture; representations of sexual and racial identity; the social and political functions of cultural spaces and commentary; the evolving relationship between modern culture and its audience; and the concept of an avant-garde. Analysis of individual works of art, literature, film, music, and primary texts forms the basis of the course.

 

HNR 280 11: Jazzing the Culture

Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Arts

Kurt Ellenberger

Description coming soon. 

 

HNR 280 21: In The Artist’s Studio: Painters, Practices, and Oil Painting Basics

Schedule: MW 3:00-5:00pm CAC 1732

Fulfills: Arts

Jill Eggers, Associate Professor

This is an introductory level course in oil painting, that will bring you into close study of the practices and conceptual goals of several painters.   Each painting project will be linked to the practices of a painter—either one of historical significance, or a contemporary painter who practices in the area.  We will take a close look at the studio practices of each artist, and in the case of area painters, visit their studios and see how they work.  We will study the artists that influenced them, and learn how their work relates to our own developing practice in the studio classroom. 

 

In the course, you will learn basic oil painting methods, skills, and vocabulary.  Course work will include painting, training in preparation and use of materials, some historical survey, visits to area artist’s studios, as well as research and imitation of painters of historical significance.  No prior working knowledge of the medium is required.  However, an interest in and an appetite for sustained studio work is.  Please note that the time commitment of a studio course is high, with five hours a week spent in class sessions, and the expectation of same for weekly homework.  Homework will need to be done in the studio classroom.


Science Courses

Students must complete one Honors Life Science Course (3 credits) and one Honors Physical Science Course (4 credits).

Students majoring in engineering, pre-health curricula, or the sciences may be able to substitute courses within their program for the Honors Sciences.

Complete the following sequence to fulfill both life and physical science requirements (Students must take these courses consecutively):

HNR 243 10 and 101: The Human Body in Motion I
Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15 and 2:30-3:45pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Brad Ambrose, Associate Professor of Physics

Edward Baum

This course is the first semester in the two-semester sequence fulfilling the General Education requirements in science for Honors students. The structure and function of human movement as well as the nature of science will be examined from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives in order to develop an appreciation for the human body.
 

 

HNR 244 01: The Human Body in Motion II (Winter)

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45 HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Bradley Ambrose, Professor

In this second course of a two-course sequence, students continue their study of human performance from biological, chemical, and physical perspectives. Specifically, the students themselves design, develop, and execute independent projects that extend beyond the background material covered in the first course of the sequence. To fulfill part of the course requirements, students complete an academic manuscript and a scholarly oral presentation.


Individual Life & Physical Science Options

If students choose not to take the all-inclusive science sequence then they must select one course from the Life Science options and one from the Physical Sciences.


Life Sciences

FALL 2017

 

HNR 242 01: Plants and People

Schedule: TR 6:00-7:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Sheila Blackman, Associate Professor of Biology

Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.
 

 

WINTER 2018

 

HNR 242 01: Plants and People
Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Karen Amisi, Adjunct Instructor of Biology

Plants are the dominant organisms on the landscape and are often taken for granted. The ecology, structure, function, genetics, and variety of plants are studied in order to develop an appreciation of the dependence of humans upon them for food, oxygen, shelter, medicines, and pleasure.

 

HNR 247 01: Molecules of Life in Perspective
Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Life Science

Debra Burg, Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences

This course is an introduction to basic biological concepts in the context of human health and disease. These concepts will provide the foundation for understanding the interplay between biotechnology and emerging strategies in health care. The impact of biotechnology on the social, economic, cultural, political and ethical aspects of society will be explored.
 

 


Physical Sciences

FALL 2017 

HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View
Schedule: MWF 11:00am-12:50pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab
Peter Wampler, Professor

This course engages students in scientific inquiry and develops a sense of discovery of the Earth system in which we live.  We investigate the dynamic nature of Earth by studying the geologic materials that comprise the Earth and the dynamic processes which that are ceaselessly changing the shape of the Earth's surface.  We look at ways in which the science of geology affects our daily lives, and also look at how the ways in which we live can impact upon our environment.

 

 

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective
Schedule: MW 1:00-2:50pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry
This is a one-semester course in chemistry for non-science majors in the Honors program.  Concepts in science are taught in the context of major societal issues such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and energy resources for the future.  A guided-inquiry course, students learn the subject matter and develop essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, information processing, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that includes reflection on learning and assessment of performance.

 

WINTER 2018 

 

HNR 241 01: The Earth, a Global View
Schedule: MWF 10:00-11:50am HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Greg Wilson, Lab Coordinator

This course engages students in scientific inquiry and develops a sense of discovery of the Earth system in which we live.  We investigate the dynamic nature of Earth by studying the geologic materials that comprise the Earth and the dynamic processes which that are ceaselessly changing the shape of the Earth's surface.  We look at ways in which the science of geology affects our daily lives, and also look at how the ways in which we live can impact upon our environment.
 

 

HNR 246 10 and 901: Chemistry in Perspective
Schedule: MW 1:00-2:50pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Physical Science and Lab

Edward Baum, Professor of Chemistry

This is a one-semester course in chemistry for non-science majors in the Honors program.  Concepts in science are taught in the context of major societal issues such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and energy resources for the future.  A guided-inquiry course, students learn the subject matter and develop essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, information processing, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that includes reflection on learning and assessment of performance.

 


Social Science Courses

Social science courses in sociology and psychology study human behavior and culture. They are concerned with the development of principles that explain individual thought, action, and experience; the interactions between people in the context of small groups, communities, institutions, states, and societies; and the functioning of social systems.

PLEASE NOTE: Because the economics courses are from one discipline, only one economics course fulfills one social science requirement. Students need to take one more Honors social science course.


FALL 2017

 

ANT 204 07: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 10:00-11:15am ASH 1302

Tara Hefferan, Associate Professor

 

This course focuses on cultural diversity and how anthropologists attempt to understand social and cultural systems in modern populations.  Students will explore theories of culture change, patterns of kinship, and the place of religious, economic, and political institutions and go outside the classroom to explore this diversity in our community. We will explore many issues in terms of case studies from various regions of the world but the course will continually emphasize the application of these concepts in our own culture and social systems. Frequently, we will make comparisons with U.S. culture and students will be asked to bring their knowledge and experiences of culture and food systems to bear upon social issues during classroom discussion.

 

PSY 101 04: Intro Psychology (Honors Section)

Schedule:  MWF 12:00-12:50am, HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science, SWS

Jennifer Gross, Associate Professor

Three themes capture our quest into all things psychological.  Despite the breadth and diversity of the field, ranging from the anatomy of the eye, to forms of pathology, to psychology’s insights on user-friendly design, all of Psychology embraces the scientific study of human behavior (Theme 1).  The scientific approach offers the highest standard of evidence, which affords a powerful approach to determine the validity of commonly-made assertions (e.g., “Is watching TV violence really harmless”).  With scientific scrutiny, you can evaluate persuasive dogma.  The study of Psychology reveals how even the simplest human behavior is influenced by a multitude of forces (Theme 2).  This insight about the complexity of behavior fosters avoidance of simplistic, naïve explanations for human actions (like, “there are two kinds of people in the world—the weak and the strong; the good and the evil”).  Nothing about human behavior is this simple.  By scientifically determining answers to questions like: “Can leading questions distort eyewitness memory, is it safe to drive and talk on the phone, can stress increase my susceptibility to colds, and are there really different learning styles,” Psychology has a practical impact on everyday life (Theme 3).

 

 

ECO 211 07: Introductory Microeconomics (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 11:30-12:45pm HON 148
Kevin Callison, Assistant Professor

 

Focuses on the interactions among households, producers, and governments in market economies. Applies fundamental methods of economic analysis to topics such as consumer decision-making and welfare; producer pricing, profits, and organization; wages and income distribution; global poverty; health care and insurance; and government taxes, spending, and regulation of markets.

 

 

 

HNR 231 01: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science
Jason Crouthamel, Professor

This course will challenge your beliefs about modern society, religion, and the human condition.  The Holocaust was not something that happened in ‘another world’.  It was a crime organized by the doctors, lawyers, professors, businessman, pastors and ‘ordinary’ people.  This fact still haunts our own society today – What is the legacy of the Holocaust? What are the implications of this event? This class will explore how and why human beings can inflict such unbelievable cruelty on each other. We will also analyze the traumatic effects of the Holocaust on victims.  In addition to studying the impact of this event on Jews, the primary target of genocidal violence, this class will also address Nazi attacks on homosexuals, the mentally disabled, ‘social outsiders’ and other groups who faced annihilation.  We will study some of the seminal books on the Holocaust by leading historians, and we will closely analyze eyewitness testimonies of perpetrators and survivors, whose voices in documentaries like Shoah will serve as a central basis for discussion.  The course mixes discussion, lecture, debates and visual media to optimize the class environment.

 

 

 

HNR 231 02: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 218

Requirements Fulfilled: Social Science

Robert Franciosi, Professor

This course will examine the Holocaust, a “watershed event” that Yehuda Bauer argues represented “something radically new” in history and that changed “human perspective.” Although we will consider the implications of this statement, our primary goal will be to gain a solid understanding of what the Holocaust was. To that end we will concentrate mostly on historical narratives and primary documents, though with our viewing of Claude Lanzmann’s epic documentary film, Shoah, and with our work on the collection How Was it Humanly Possible?, we will also consider the psychological, social, political, historical, cultural, and economic forces that affected the various groups impacted by the destruction of Europe’s Jews—the perpetrators, victims, bystanders, rescuers, and resisters. Students who complete HNR231 will be eligible to participate in the Spring 2017 course “Remembering the Holocaust: Sites, Museums, and Memorials,” which will include travel for two weeks in Germany and Poland.

 

 

 

SOC 313 02: Race and Ethnicity

Schedule: MWF 10:00-10:50am HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: US Diversity and Social Science

Jennifer Stewart, Professor

Over the course of this semester, we will examine historical and contemporary forms of racism in the US.  We will also study the social construction of race or the process by which laws, language, visual images, education, and structural positioning creates and maintains race and difference.  By examining the experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in the US, we will be able to see how race is defined, experienced, and lived.  To make sense of our studies we will be emphasizing the contributions of critical race theorists, new labor historians, and other contemporary sociologists working in the area of Race & Ethnic Studies.

 

WINTER 2018

 

ECO 210 10: Introductory Macroeconomics (Honors Section)

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15 MAK B2116

Dan Giedeman, Professor

Introduction to the study of the national and global economies. Topics include the effects of government taxation and budget deficits on economic growth; ways to alleviate unemployment, inflation and international trade imbalances; and the importance of expectations and decision-making in an uncertain world.

 

HNR 231 01: SWS The Holocaust

Schedule: MWF 9:00-9:50am HON 220

Jason Crouthamel, Professor

This course will challenge your beliefs about modern society, religion, and the human condition.  The Holocaust was not something that happened in ‘another world’.  It was a crime organized by the doctors, lawyers, professors, businessman, pastors and ‘ordinary’ people.  This fact still haunts our own society today – What is the legacy of the Holocaust? What are the implications of this event? This class will explore how and why human beings can inflict such unbelievable cruelty on each other. We will also analyze the traumatic effects of the Holocaust on victims.  In addition to studying the impact of this event on Jews, the primary target of genocidal violence, this class will also address Nazi attacks on homosexuals, the mentally disabled, ‘social outsiders’ and other groups who faced annihilation.  We will study some of the seminal books on the Holocaust by leading historians, and we will closely analyze eyewitness testimonies of perpetrators and survivors, whose voices in documentaries like Shoah will serve as a central basis for discussion.  The course mixes discussion, lecture, debates and visual media to optimize the class environment.

 



Junior Seminar

Junior seminars are typically taken during junior year. This will give you an opportunity to learn more in your major, so you can bring your experience and knowledge to the junior seminar.

The topics vary from semester to semester, but junior seminars are opportunities to look in-depth at a topic, issue, or problem, often in ways that allow a student to view the subject through the lens of her or his own major, and to see how students in other majors provide different perspectives on the same subject.

SPRING/SUMMER 2017

 

HNR 311 03: SWS People with Dirty Hands: Controversies in Food & Agriculture

Schedule: Arranged, Online

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Amy McFarland

This course will study the controversial topics within the food and agriculture industries with a focus on the different ways in which the industry and consumers have created and responded to controversies. We will study issues and controversies such as those involving: raw milk, USDA nutrition guidelines, the health claims from the egg industry, GMO labeling, food safety measures, agriculture subsidies, international food aid, agriculture gag laws, recombinant bovine growth hormone in dairy, migrant food workers, the struggle for living wages for farmers, and superfood frenzies. Students will explore the societal and international complexities to these issues. This course will fulfill the World Perspectives category by focusing on the international complexity of various food issues.  This course will fulfill the SWS requirement through pre-writing, writing, and revision activities throughout the entirety of the course.

 

HNR 312 01: SWS Amer Music in Amer Century

Schedule: Arranged, Online

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity, 1 Issues, 1 SWS

Kurt Ellenberger        

 

This course will examine the various styles of American music in the 20C including folk, jazz, classical, blues, pop, rock, country, and other genres. In particular, jazz and blues, as invented and developed by African Americans, have had a profound effect on the development of popular music around the world as well as on the Western European classical tradition. From this perspective, American Music represents the diversity and grandeur of the American cultural experience. As such, we will study the music with a particular interest in how it intersects with and helps define American culture. In doing so, we will traverse disciplines including music, history, philosophy, politics, and cultural studies. 

  • This course qualifies as US Diversity and is an SWS course. 
  • This is an online course and will be conducted entirely online.

Note: This course does not require previous knowledge of music. There will be no discipline specific content in music theory, history, or performance; however, we will introduce a small amount of rudimentary music terminology that will be explained and demonstrated.

 

 

HNR 312 02: Islamophobia

Schedule: Arranged, Online

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, US Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Coeli Fitzpatrick

 

This course traces the roots of the fraught and complex ways which Islam, and the fear of Islam, is expressed in the United States. Using texts, journal and news articles, T.V. shows, social media and movies, we will explore the many expressions of Islamophobia in contemporary U.S. culture, as well as looking at different responses (political, intellectual, religious). We will also explore issues of cultural identity, racial, ethnic, and gender difference, immigration, and citizenship, with all of the accompanying social anxieties and political ramifications. Because we are will look at how Islam is represented through Islamophobia, we will not be studying “what Islam really is”, but rather “how Islam is expressed”.

 

HNR 312 03: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: Arranged, Online

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity, 1 Issues, 1 SWS

Heather Wallace

 

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, nonfiction, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation.  Topics may include critical theory, US health care policy, research/experimentation, aging, AIDS, rehabilitation, acute care, clinical decision-making, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students will explore foundational ethical principles in the context of their own values and real-world ethical dilemmas.  Self-directed and a student-centered, problem-posing Freirean teaching-learning model is used.

 

 

 

 

FALL 2017

 

HNR 312 01: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: MW 4:30-5:45pm HON 214
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.
 

 

HNR 312 03: SWS Theory of Human Rights

Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity, 1 SWS 1 Issues

Richard Hiskes, Professor

Explores the historical and philosophical development of the theory of human rights and, in the second half of the term applies theoretical approaches to significant human rights issues such as trafficking, genocide, and the rights of minority populations.  Among other objectives, students will learn to appreciate different philosophical schools of thought regarding the reality of rights and their applicability to contemporary issues and construct written and oral arguments exploring the relevance and usefulness of applying human rights concepts to contemporary political, international, and ethical issues and problems.

 

HNR 312 04: SWS Sociology of Consumption

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues
Joel Stillerman

Consumption – the desire for, purchase, use, exchange, and disposal of products and services – is an essential feature of our everyday lives, yet we seldom examine its meaning and importance.  Why do we desire certain products?  How are our desires shaped by advertising, marketing, and market research? How do our tastes reflect our class, gender, racial, and age groups to which we belong?  In this course students will have the opportunity to explore these questions by reading key theoretical perspectives on the nature and meaning of consumption as well as recent research on consumer culture in the U.S. Readings have a specific focus on how consumer behavior and consumer culture both reflect and help reinforce social inequalities based on class, race, gender and age.  Significant themes include the role of advertising and promotion in consumption and culture, how historical legacies of racial inequality affect the patterns of consumption across ethnic/racial groups, the symbolic and ritual aspects of consumption, the ethics of consumption, the relationship between consumption and social roles/identities (gender, age, race), and the intersection of consumption/ sales practices with personal relationships.  Classes combine lectures, discussions, group activities, and audiovisual materials.  Assignments include research exercises on consumer behavior, reading summaries and reflective journals on students’ consumption practices.   

 

HNR 312 05: SWS Music, Culture, and Aesthetics

Schedule: TR1:00-2:15pm HON 218

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and US Diversity, 1SWS, 1 Issues
Kurt Ellenberger

This course will examine music as it intersects with and helps define culture in present-day America (where culturally-diverse genres coexist and cross-pollinate in a surprising manner), and contrast this with similar developments during pivotal points in the last 500 years. We will look at “art music” and popular music in many of their forms and examine them through readings from scholarly and popular writings. Aesthetics will function as a means of identifying embedded cultural values that transcend genre, thus illuminating our understanding of music in a broader societal context.

 

HNR 312 06: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:15pm HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Jane Toot, Professor

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.
 

 

HNR 313 01: SWS Design Thinking to Meet Real World Needs

Schedule: W 6:00-8:50pm HON 218

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Linda Chamberlain

This might be the most important course you’ll ever take at GVSU. Design thinking will help you change the world, starting by changing your world. Design thinking is one of the top skills employers are looking for in today’s economic climate - the ability to understand real problems, think creatively, work collaboratively, and develop meaningful solutions. In this course, you will collaborate on an multidisciplinary team to learn and practice the design thinking process - an iterative, creative, problem solving approach - by addressing a challenge faced within the local community, a real world problem. You will work hard. You will learn a lot. You will forever think differently.

 

HNR 313 02: SWS Cosmology for Poets

Schedule: TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Edward Baum

The course explores humankind's current understanding of the nature of the universe and surveys the links between the fundamental scientific, philosophical, and religious issues in cosmology, past and present.  It reviews human efforts, from earliest to most recent, to understand the origin, nature, and fate of the universe.  We investigate primitive cosmogonies as described in the Rig Veda, Prose Edda, and other ancient documents.  Greek and Arab debate over philosophical issues concerning the universe's existence are studied.  The theological and mystical concerns of Christian and Islamic scholars in the Middle Ages are discussed.  Finally, we explore how the Hubble telescope and other powerful scientific instruments have given the world community an unprecedented view of the cosmos and the ability to test cosmological theories, converting cosmology into a scientific endeavor.

 

 

 

 

WINTER 2018

 

HNR 311 01: Problem Solving for Sustainable Solutions through System Analysis
Schedule: TR 1:00 -2:15pm HON 218
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and World Perspective, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

This course will examine a variety of problem solving techniques which can be used across disciplines and which support a sustainable approach to seeking solutions. The range of professions will included business, education, health care, and politics. Participants will learn how to identify, use and develop isomorphic strategies and tools to address presented problems.

 

HNR 311 02 Textual Tease: Biblical Interpretations in the Modern World     

Schedule: ONLINE    

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior seminar, World Perspectives, 1 SWS, 1 Issues 

Jeremiah Cataldo                                                               

We often assume that the Bible speaks clairvoyantly about social-political issues that concern us in our present moments, mostly in the form of “Thou shalt not …” But what if the Bible is more scandalous in nature? What if it betrays the same struggles with gender, politics, and even religion that we moderns do? What if the Bible likes sex? This course dives straight into the depths of those issues and exposes the darker side of the biblical texts, not only in its authoring and editing but also in its reception history.

 

HNR 311 04: Culture & the Holocaust

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 236E

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, World Perspectives, 1 SWS 1 Issues

Robert Franciosi

This course examines the Holocaust’s lasting effects on American culture. We will first consider what Americans knew about the unfolding disaster between 1933 and 1945 and then focus our attention on four pivotal moments: 1945, when images of the liberated camps filled newspapers and movie screens; 1961, when testimony from the Eichmann trial flickered across black-and-white televisions; 1978 when the television miniseries Holocaust attracted millions of viewers and eventually became an international sensation; and 1993, called by some “the year of the Holocaust,” when both the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and Schindler’s List opened to wide public attention and acclaim.  After tracing the evolution of what has been termed American Holocaust consciousness, we will then consider its current position in our cultural discourse and speculate on its future significance.

 

Students will also participate in “History Unfolded,” a crowd-sourcing project sponsored by the USHMM which aims to collect information on what American newspapers reported about the Holocaust as it was being perpetrated.

 

HNR 312 01: SWS Music, Culture and Aesthetics

Schedule: MW 1:30-2:45pm HON 218

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, US Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Kurt Ellenberger, Associate Professor of Music

This course will examine music as it intersects with and helps define culture in present-day America (where culturally-diverse genres coexist and cross-pollinate in a surprising manner), and contrast this with similar developments during pivotal points in the last 500 years. We will look at “art music” and popular music in many of their forms and examine them through readings from scholarly and popular writings. Aesthetics will function as a means of identifying embedded cultural values that transcend genre, thus illuminating our understanding of music in a broader societal context.

 

 

HNR 312 02: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies
Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45pm HON 236E
Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar and U.S. Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.



 

HNR 312 04: SWS Literary Explorations of Medical Controversies

Schedule: MW 1:30-2:45pm HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar & U.S. Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Jane Toot, Professor of Physical Therapy

This junior seminar focuses on ethical, cultural, and controversial issues in medicine today. Through fiction, poetry, memoirs, film, and essays, we learn not only about people’s experiences with illness, but also how cultural differences shape our interactions with the healthcare system. Our analysis of texts elucidates attitudes toward race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation, which have been implicit in “objective” medical science from the Victorian period through our contemporary experience. Topics include research/experimentation, aging, women’s health issues, AIDS, depression, cancer, and end of life concerns. Students are encouraged to use course assignments to explore their own areas of specific interest.


 

HNR 312 05: SWS The Terror of Monotheism

Schedule: MW 3:00-4:15pm HON 148

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, US Diversity, 1 Issues, 1 SWS

Jeremiah Cataldo, Professor

 

This course analyzes the ideological and material formation of monotheistic religious identities, historical and modern, and how those identities restrict forms or types of social engagement with the surrounding world. It starts with this basic hypothesis: monotheism, in its different forms, is a product of a contest for authority that begins in the material world.

 

 

HNR 312 06: SWS Sex, Power, and Politics

Schedule: TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 236E

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, US Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Karen Zivi, Professor

This course explores various theories of sex, gender, sexuality, and power, and examines how competing ideas and discourses about sex and gender shape our political processes, laws, and public policies in important and sometimes unexpected ways. It pays particular attention to the ways that understandings of sexual difference can reinforce the inequality and subordination of certain individuals and/ or open up possibilities for change.

 

This interdisciplinary seminar-style course brings the writings of feminist, political, and social theorists together with analyses of contemporary public policy controversies. Student will be encouraged to consider questions such as: Are men and women born or made? What role does biology play in shaping our identities, characters, and life? What difference does or should “sexual difference” make? And what role should the individual, the state, or society play in making it possible for individuals to flourish?  While emphasis will be placed on understanding the theoretical underpinnings and political implications of these questions, attention will also be given to the way they play out in contemporary US controversies about the roles of women in and outside of the home, changing norms of masculinity, the meaning and scope of reproductive freedom, the value or danger of pornography, and the ongoing struggle for LGBT equality.

 

HNR 312 07: SWS Spirituality & Health

Schedule: TR 11:30-12:45am HON 220

Requirements fulfilled: Junior Seminar, US Diversity, 1 SWS, 1 Issues

Heather Wallace

Description coming soon.

 

HNR 313 02: Public Culture Studio

Schedule: MW 3:00-5:30pm

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, 1 Issues, 1 SWS

Paul Wittenbraker

In Public Culture Studio visual art methods are used to study, form, and present art in a specific public context. The course includes the development of a project site, individual and collaborative work, and community engagement. The studio operates “in public” presenting lectures, visual displays, and public gatherings. The studio will work visually and experientially to study and produce public spaces, public practices, public things, public events, and public imaginaries. The course will include introduction to important precedents in public and socially-engaged art, and discussions of relevant texts from multiple disciplines. 

 

This course is based on methods and content developed in ART 391 Civic Studio. For a sampling of past projects and presentations see the Civic Studio Website.  For more information please contact Professor Paul Wittenbraker

 

HNR 313 03: SWS Design Thinking to Meet Real World Needs

Schedule: W 6:00-8:50pm EC 510

Requirements Fulfilled: Junior Seminar, 1 Issues, 1 SWS

Linda Chamberlain

 

So how do you go about leading new ways of thinking to make positive impact in the world?   Design Thinking to Meet Real World Needs is a course focused on identifying, framing, and breaking through paradigms for answers for tough problems.  Where possible solutions – products or services- can have real social, political and economic impact.  This co-instructed course will start by having you engage with community stakeholders to learn and appreciate their “real world” challenges.  Then in interdisciplinary teams, you will use “Design Thinking” method - a non-linear and iterative process that drives inspiration, imagination and idea development- to push beyond current assumptions into new possibilities.  Peer, community stakeholder and instructor feedback are a core component in reaching successful outcomes.  The course will conclude with each team creating solution prototypes for presentation to the invested community collaborator.  This course truly is a get-in-and-get-involved experience through which you will learn differentiating and valuable skills in innovation methods, teaming, and personal effectiveness so that you too can be a catalyst for constructive change! 

 

 


Supplementary Honors Courses

These are recommended courses for students in the Seidman College of Business.

Fall 2017

ACC 212 08: Principles of Financial Accounting (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 218

Requirements Fulfilled:  Elective

Cheryl Dunn, Professor

Students in this course are given the tools needed to develop the ability to prepare, analyze, and interpret accounting information. Basic accounting concepts will be applied to facilitate understanding of the relationship between business activities and accounting information.  Students will develop problem solving, critical thinking, and communication skills necessary to use accounting information, form conclusions about business activities, and communicate those conclusions to others.  Accounting majors and minors who complete both Accounting 212 honors and Accounting 213 honors will be permitted to waive Accounting 240.

 

 

BUS 201 13 : Legal Environment for Business (Honors Section)

Schedule: M 4:00-5:15pm HON 220   *This is a hybrid course, meaning it will not meet jointly every week. See details below.*

Requirements Fulfilled: Elective

Star Swift, Professor

Bus 201 is a law class that teaches the students the basics of law. Some of the topics are the constitution, contracts, civil and human rights, criminal law, the new digital workplace and international law.  The class will meet every other week as a whole group on Monday nights.  The students will be required to make an Op Doc (five minute film) about a current legal topic.

 

Consequently students (as assigned or whenever they need help) will be meeting with the professor on the Monday nights when the whole class is not meeting to receive advice and assistance with their Op Doc.  We will also be using a new technology called Bluescape.  Here is a short video for you to view Bluescape:http://www.wzzm13.com/story/news/local/grand-rapids-central/2014/11/03/gvsu-students-use-bluescape/18447805/

 

MTH 201-05 Calculus 1

Schedule: TR 1:00-2:50pm MAK A2165

Jiyeon Suh, Associate Professor

Requirements Fulfilled: Mathematical Sciences

Prerequisite: Mth 122 &123, or MTH 124 or assignment through GVSU Math Placement. 

 

Students will be highly encouraged to participate in classroom discussion first within their own groups and then sharing with the whole class.  In learning coding, students will learn the basics of computer programming such as basic logic, the concept of variable/function, and basic algorithms. In the data analysis portion, students will learn the basic theory behind inference and how to interpret the various results of analysis. We plan to design activities/tasks for inside and outside the classroom that would induce students’ deep/active learning and also encourage participation and involvement. The way the course is designed is to emphasize the development of MATH/Calculus through addressing "needs" of the human race. The data/questions/problems are from all sorts of aspects of human life which means we will delve into many different disciplinary areas. In a regular MTH 201 course, the basic knowledge of "function" is assumed of students and various elementary functions are discussed and worked on. Our plan is to present the data from real situations (such as bank account balances, population growth, data from various distributions (possibly simulated)) and ask the students to investigate and to discover patterns/limits/trends etc. We are hoping that we can collect various types of questions (data) and prepare activities that diverse enough so that the students have a chance to work on some problems/projects that can be geared toward their own major and reach deeper understanding.

Winter 2018

ACC 213 06: Principles of Managerial Accounting (Honors Section)

Schedule: TR 8:30-9:45am HON 214

Requirements Fulfilled:  Elective

Anne Sergeant, Assistant Professor

This course examines the use of accounting information for planning, control and decision-making in business.  Topics include product costing, cost behavior analysis, activity-based costing, budgeting, variance analysis, performance measures in a decentralized organization, pricing, relevant costs for decision-making and careers in accounting.  The course provides students the opportunity to use accounting information to solve relevant business problems. Accounting majors and minors who complete both Accounting 212 honors and Accounting 213 honors will be permitted to waive Accounting 240.

 

BUS 201 08: Legal Environment for Business (Honors Section)

Schedule: T 4:00-5:15pm HON 220   *This is a hybrid course, meaning it will not meet jointly every week. See details below.*

Requirements Fulfilled: Elective

Star Swift, Professor

Bus 201 is a law class that teaches the students the basics of law. Some of the topics are the constitution, contracts, civil and human rights, criminal law, the new digital workplace and international law.  The class will meet every other week as a whole group on Monday nights.  The students will be required to make an Op Doc (five minute film) about a current legal topic.

 

Consequently students (as assigned or whenever they need help) will be meeting with the professor on the Monday nights when the whole class is not meeting to receive advice and assistance with their Op Doc.  We will also be using a new technology called Bluescape.  Here is a short video for you to view Bluescape:http://www.wzzm13.com/story/news/local/grand-rapids-central/2014/11/03/gvsu-students-use-bluescape/18447805/

 

STA 215 55: Introductory Applied Statistics (Honors Section)

Schedule: M 10:00-10:50am MAK D2233, W 10:00-10:50am MAK A2111, F 10:00-10:50am MAK A2103

Kirk Anderson, Associate Professor

The Honors section of STA 215: Introductory Applied Statistics will be a cross-disciplinary course combining statistics and history.  Students in this section will receive an overview of commonly used statistical methods, but the historical background behind each technique will be explored as well.  As such, students will see the “big picture” not just of how modern statistical methods are useful today, but of the circumstances that prompted their invention and the impact that has been felt since.

 



Page last modified September 20, 2017