Dr J Banner Frederik Meijer Honors College

Foundational Interdisciplinary Sequence

FOUNDATIONAL INTERDISCIPLINARY SEQUENCES 2014-2015

 

Alliance and Conflict: World Construction in Religion and Society

Fall Semester:          HNR 280 section 04 (Must also enroll in a section of Live, Learn, Lead)
Winter Semester:    HNR 280 sections 03 and 04      
Schedule (First Semester): MWF 12-12:50 HON 218
Schedule (Second Semester): MWF 11-11:50 and 12-12:50 HON 218

Fulfills: Arts, History, SWS, World Perspectives, Social Science (or Philosophy & Literature if needed)
Jeremiah Cataldo, Assistant Professor of History and Meijer Honors College
 

At the heart of every social relationship, whether among human collectives or with the natural world, exists either alliance or conflict. In this sequence, we investigate the nature of those dialectical relationships as they take place between religion and society. We will look at how those relationships have defined or framed in particular collective identities, behaviors, morals, truths, and laws. We will look also at how those relationships have affected the construction of knowledge.

This sequence will be taught from a social-scientific approach,  introducing students to different types of critical theories. Drawing upon select religious and cultural contexts, areas of focus will include: religious and cultural “normatives,” texts, art, philosophy, theology, linguistics, and politics. The first semester of this sequence will focus both on an introduction to different critical theories and select religions and societies before and during the so-called “Axial Age” (800-300 BCE). The second semester will pursue a relative mastery of critical theory and focus on post-“Axial Age” religions and societies. By the end of the sequence, students will have an understanding of how religion and society are mutually constructive through relations of alliance and conflict. In addition, the theories and analytical procedures used throughout the sequence will provide helpful tools for critical analysis in other courses in the humanities and the social- and political-sciences.
 

 

Latin American Civilization

Fall Semester:         HNR 280 26 & 27

Winter Semester:    HNR 280 23 & 24

Fulfills: Art, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, WRT 150 (with a B or better), SWS

Schedule (First Semester): MWF 1:00-1:50pm LHH 161, 2:00-2:50pm LHH 102

Schedule (Second Semester):  MWF 1:00-1:50pm HON 218, 2:00-2:50pm ASH 2320

David Stark, Associate Professor of History

Jose Lara

This is a two-course sequence on Latin American civilization and culture from pre-conquest times to the present. We will survey various aspects of Latin American civilization to include the history, literature, culture, and arts of Latin America.  Given the vastness of Latin America the approach of the course is thematic and chronological rather than regional. The first part will address the development of the great Amerindian civilizations, the encounter between Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans, the making of a colonial society, the struggles leading to the collapse of colonial rule, and the wars of independence. The second part will pay attention to five specific and interconnected themes: the struggle to define the nation, imperialism and intervention, divergent paths of political and economic development, resistance and revolution, and confronting the challenges of modernity. Upon completion of the two sequences students will have a comprehensive understanding of how the complex interaction between different cultures melding in the Americas shaped the colonial societies, and how some elements of this legacy persisted or were transformed by different social groups before and after independence.

 

Islamic Middle East

Fall Semester:         HNR 209 and 210, section 01: Islamic Middle East I
Winter Semester:   HNR 219 and 220, section 01: Islamic Middle East II                         
Schedule (First Semester):
MW 12:00 – 2:45 HON 219

Schedule (Second Semester): MW 12:00-2:45pm HON 219
Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 211, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS

Coeli Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor of Philosophy

Mahd Al-Mallah


Fall: This course looks at the rise of Islam from the hot desert of the Arabian Peninsula and traces its development and expansion through the region and beyond until the decline of the last Islamic Caliphate, the Ottoman Empire.  Students will learn about the world that was Muhammad’s birthplace, and answers to questions about him and the new religion of Islam.  What was the world of Mecca and Medina like before Muhammad?  What did this new religion change?  How did was the message of the Qur’an revealed and received?  What does the Qur’an really say?  How did the Muslims conquer the Middle East so quickly—did they ride through the region with swords in one hand and Qur’ans in the other?  How did Muslims and Middle Eastern Christians and Jews experience the Crusades?  What is it like to view these historical events through their eyes?  In answering these and many other questions, we will explore the rich cultural, literary, philosophical and artistic legacy created by the Muslims in this period called the Classical period of Islam.

 

Winter: The decline of the last Islamic Caliphate, the Ottoman Empire, used to be described by historians as a history of “the sick man of Europe.”  The final demise of the sick man happens after WW I, and it is a period of immense change in the Middle East—indeed it is the period where the “Middle East” and many of its countries are invented—with the border lines of some countries literally drawn up by European politicians.  These massive changes leave their marks everywhere in the society: Islam undergoes a major reform, socially and politically and comes to be a vehicle of resistance towards outside interference; Muslim modernizers and revivalists struggles over the influence of Islam within society; Allah’s gift of oil to the Arabs and Muslims is discovered; new literary genres are developed and we see the rise of the Arabic novel;  the state of Israel is created; the feminist movement begins and women demand more rights; all citizens demand representation.  But most of the Middle East today is still governed by monarchies and dictators—why?  And what about terrorists from the Middle East? The Western world views the Middle East as a hotbed of fanatical Muslims.  What truth is there to this view?  What do average Muslims think about the West?  This sequel to HNR 209/210 explores the modern Middle East in all its fascinating aspects: religion, culture, society, literature, history.  This makes reading the news much more relevant and interesting!

 

Classical World     

Fall Semester:          HNR 211 and 212, section 01: Classical World I

Winter Semester:    HNR 221 and 222, section 01: Classical World II
Schedule (First Semester): MWF 1:00-2:50pm HON 220

Schedule (Second Semester): MWF 1:00-2:50pm HON 220

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 203, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS
Diane Rayor, Professor

 

This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of the history, literature, intellectual history, philosophy, and arts of the Classical period with emphasis on Greeks and Romans. This approach includes close and extensive reading of primary sources (such as literary texts and artifacts) and secondary sources (including history and art history textbooks).

 

American Civilization, section 01

Fall Semester:        HNR 213 and 214, section 01: American Civilization I
Winter Semester:  HNR 223 and 224, section 01: American Civilization II
NOTE: You must take section 01 for both semesters.  

Schedule (First Semester): MWF 9:00-10:50am HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): MWF 9:00-10:50am HON 218

Fulfill: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, U.S. Diversity, HST 205, HST 206, ENG 225, ENG 226, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS
Kelly Ross, Professor
Douglas Montagna, Associate Professor of History

     
This course provides a survey of American history, literature, and intellectual progress from European Colonization through Reconstruction.

 

American Civilization, section 02

Fall Semester:        HNR 213 and 214, section 02: American Civilization I
Winter Semester:  HNR 223 and 224, section 02: American Civilization II
NOTE: You must take section 02 for both semesters.  

Schedule (First Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 219

Schedule (Second Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 219

Fulfill: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, U.S. Diversity, HST 205, HST 206, ENG 225, ENG 226, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS
Steve Tripp, Professor of History
Michael Webster, Professor of English

 

This section of the Honors Foundation course focuses exclusively on the United States during the twentieth century, what publisher Henry Luce boldly identified as the “American Century.”   Using literature, poetry, film, autobiography, art, photography, and music, we will examine the lives of people who lived through the industrial revolution, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, two world wars, de-industrialization, revolt, and reaction.  During the Fall semester, we will pay particular attention to the concept of Modernity in all its glorious manifestations.  In the Winter, we will consider the fate of Modernity amidst the social, political, and cultural upheaval of post-World War II America. 

 

European Civilization, section 01

Fall Semester:        HNR 215/216, section 01: European Civilization I   
Winter Semester:  HNR 225/226, section 01: European Civilization II 

Note: You must take section 01 for both semesters.

Schedule (First Semester): TR 10:00am-12:45pm HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 10:00am-12:45pm HON 218

Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 204, ENG 221, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS

Gretchen Galbraith, Associate Professor of History

David Eick, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures

 

This course examines the sweeping political and cultural changes taking place in Europe from the 1630s through the 1790s, from the laying of the groundwork of absolute monarchy through its downfall at the end of the eighteenth century. Studying history, art and literature in tandem will yield insights into the ways in which governments attempted to maintain their prerogatives while writers challenged dominant ideologies and promoted new values like tolerance of difference, freedom of thought and expression, equality and human rights. While we examine these sweeping changes, we will also delve deeply into the period of the French Revolution. Working with materials from the “Reacting to the Past” (RTTP) consortium, we will plunge into the intellectual, political, and ideological currents that surged through revolutionary Paris in 1791. Students will lead major factions within the National Assembly (and in the streets outside) as it struggles to create a constitution amidst internal chaos and threats of foreign invasion. Will the king retain power? Will the priests of the Catholic Church obey the “general will” of the National Assembly or the dictates of the pope? Do traditional institutions and values constitute restraints on freedom and individual dignity or are they its essential bulwarks? Is violence a legitimate means of changing society or of purging it of dangerous enemies? As we wrestle with these questions, students will hone skills —speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership, and teamwork—in order to prevail in difficult and complicated situations. Throughout the semester, we will explore the how the lives and work of ordinary people, writers, artists and musicians both reflected and shaped historical events. 

 

European Civilization, section 02

Fall Semester:      HNR 215/216, section 03: European Civilization I   
Winter Semester:  HNR 225/226, section 03 European Civilization II  
NOTE: You must take section 02 for both semesters.
Schedule (First Semester): TR 1:00-3:45pm HON 220

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 1:00-3:45pm HON 220
Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 204, ENG 221, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS
Grace Coolidge, Associate Professor of History

Diane Wright, Professor of Modern Languages

Jason Crouthamel,  Associate Professor of History

 

This course will examine the development of European Civilization from the Medieval period through 1800 through the reading and discussion of representative literary works and historical documents. We will take special consideration of the perspective of the Iberian Peninsula , given its unique historical and geographical position as the cultural crossroad of East and West, where the three “peoples of the book” coexisted in complex patterns of harmony and tension. In addition to becoming familiar with the main literary genres and currents (early lyric poetry, development of narrative fiction, courtly love, picaresque fiction, drama) in their historical contexts (the Black Plague, the Reformation and Counter Reformation, the Inquisition, Scientific Revolution, etc.) we will also listen to the voices of individual Christians, Muslims and Jews in order to address such issues as: the creation of the other, the marginal status (of minorities and women) and the formation of identity (social, cultural, and religious). We will compare and contrast Spain to the rest of Europe, learning about its uniqueness as well as about the common ties that bind it to the mainland. We will begin by examining the forms of interaction among the three groups in Medieval Europe that will then lead us to examine the marginalization and portrayal of Jews and Muslims. The ultimate objective is to gain an understanding of early Europe both historically and culturally as well as confront the often conflictive and complex nature and cultural transformations that were experienced through the Early Modern period.  

 

Making of Europe I

Fall Semester:        HNR 217 01 Making of Europe I 
Winter Semester:  HNR 218 01 Making of Europe II: The High Middle Ages

Schedule (Fall and Winter Semester): TR 10:00-11:15am HON 220
Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 203, ENG 220
Benjamin Lockerd, Professor of English

Alice Chapman, Assistant Professor of History

Mark Pestana, Professor of Philosophy

Eric Gollannek, Visiting Professor of Art & Design

 

This is the first course in a 4-course sequence that will address the development of European culture from the end of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the modern era.  This first course seeks to give students some knowledge of the Roman Empire and then to enter into a study of the early Middle Ages, from about 450 A.D. to about 1100 A.D.  The approach of the course will be interdisciplinary, with professors from all the major disciplines within the Humanities.  In this way, we hope to achieve a comprehensive view of the development of European civilization during this period.  Each semester of the Making of Europe sequence involves all four disciplines, but each of the four semesters also focuses particularly on one of the four disciplines, as follows: HNR 217: History, HNR 218: Philosophy, HNR 227: Art, HNR 228: Literature.
 

This second course will examine the late Middle Ages (sometimes called the High Middle Ages) in Europe, from approximately 900 to approximately 1300 A.D.  We will study and discuss the cultural, artistic, religious, intellectual, and political developments that took place at this time.  The course will be interdisciplinary, involving discussion of history, philosophy, art, architecture, music, and literature of the period. The course emphasizes the great philosophical works of the era, especially the Summa Theologica of St. Thomas Aquinas.


Fall Semester:             HNR 227 01 Making of Europe III: Early Renaissance
Winter Semester:       HNR 228 01 Making of Europe IV: SWS

Schedule (Fall and Winter Semester):   TR 8:30-9:45am HON 220

Benjamin Lockerd, Professor of English

See additional list of faculty above        

             

This course (Making of Europe III) will examine the transition from the late Middle Ages to the early Renaissance period in Europe.  The Renaissance begins at different times in different regions: around 1300 in Italy, but not until the late 1400s in England.  Historically, we will look at roughly that period, but in literature we will move forward into the late 1500s. We will study the various cultural, artistic, religious, intellectual, and political developments of the period, with an emphasis on the romance epic, the development of polyphony, and Renaissance painting.  The course is interdisciplinary, involving history, art, architecture, music, philosophy, and literature.  There will be a pronounced emphasis on the great artistic accomplishments of this period.

 

The last course (Making of Europe IV) will examine the late Renaissance (also called the early Modern) period in Europe, from approximately 1500 to approximately 1700.  Major topics in the course will be the Protestant Reformation, the consolidation of the modern European nation states, and Humanism.  We will study the cultural, artistic, intellectual, and political developments of the era.  The course is interdisciplinary, involving history, art, architecture, music, philosophy, and literature. There will be an emphasis on literature.

 

Focus on East Asia

Fall Semester:             HNR 280, section 05 and 06: Focus on Asia I
Winter Semester:       HNR 280, section 05 and 06: Focus on Asia II
NOTE: You must take sections five and six for both semesters.
Schedule (First Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): MW 3:00-5:45pm HON 218
Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 203, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS

Craig Benjamin, Associate Professor of History

Yan Liang, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures


This course explores the history and culture of China, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, and Central Asia between c. 50,000 BCE and today. East Asian history and culture is often neglected in mainstream Western education systems, but over recent decades we have come to realize the fundamental significance of this region to global history. China has the longest continuous history of any civilization, and for millennia was the wealthiest and most powerful empire on Earth.  Today one-fifth of the world’s population lives in China, a nation undergoing rapid economic growth and social and political transformation.  China now has the second largest economy on the world, and Japan the third.  This course explores the extraordinary technological and philosophical contributions the eastern regions of Eurasia have made to world culture through a detailed consideration of the political, military, economic and cultural history of China and the other major eastern hemisphere nations.

 

During the first semester, Professor Benjamin explores the rich history of China from the Paleolithic Era to the Tang Dynasty, including China’s engagement with ancient Central Asia along the Silk Roads.  At the same time, Professor Liang will offer a comprehensive overview of the literature of China from ancient times through to the twenty-first century.  In the second semester, Professor Benjamin follows Chinese history from the Tang Dynasty through to today, and also investigates the long and fascinating history of Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.  At the same time, Professor Robinson will offer a comprehensive overview of the literature and culture of Korea and Japan.   By the end of this two-semester course students will have gained a deep understanding and appreciation of the fascinating 50,000 year-long history of this dynamic region, and the extraordinary contributions its peoples have made to global culture.  This course fulfills the General Education Program's Foundations (Philosophy and Literature Emphasis) and World Perspective (Culture Emphasis), and WRT 150 designations. You will also learn how to research and write extensive and rigorous research essays.

 

History of Science            

Fall Semester:         HNR 280 11 and 12 History of Science I
Winter Semester:   HNR 280 11 and 12 History of Science II

NOTE: You must take sections 11 and 12 for both semesters.
Schedule (First Semester): TR 8:30-11:15am HON 148

Schedule (Second Semester): TR 8:30-11:15am HON 148
Fulfills: Arts, History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, WRT 150 (with B or better), SWS
Sheldon Kopperl, Professor of Biomedical Sciences
Andrew D. Spear, Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Jeffrey T. Brynes, Assistant Professor of Philosophy

The first semester of a two semester sequence will explore the history, philosophy, literature, and the arts of Europe in an integrated set of two courses that will focus on the history and philosophy of science and technology up to the work of Isaac Newton and Rene Descartes. However, we shall be looking at other aspects of the history of the period as well. These will include but by no means be limited to: the response to the Black Death of the mid-fourteenth century, the Renaissance, the impact of the Fall of Constantinople in 1453, and the impact of the Protestant Reformation and its destabilizing effect on European history for the next 150 years.

 

The second semester takes the class into the time and work of Isaac Newton and his influence on the age of the enlightenment.  We also explore the period of the Industrial Revolution and the beginnings of modern chemistry.  We also focus on the visual arts from the Renaissance through the Baroque, Neoclassical and Romantic periods, finishing with the Impressionist movement in France.  The age of Revolutions in Europe and America, and Romanticism in literature and philosophy are also covered.

 

Big History             

Fall Semester: HNR 280 Sections 07, 08 Big History I
Winter Semester: HNR 280 Sections 07, 08 Big History II

Schedule (First Semester): TR 2:30-5:15pm HON 218

Schedule (Second Semester): TR  2:30-5:15pm HON 218

Fulfills: History, Philosophy & Literature, World Perspectives, HST 380, WRT 150 (w/ B or better), SWS, Physical Science

Craig Benjamin, Associate Professor of History

Various Professors from different Disciplines will be guest speakers throughout the year

Everything that exists has a history: each person, plant, animal and object, our planet, and the entire universe.  Each of these histories offers valuable insights; but collectively they reveal even more. Big history weaves evidence and perspectives from many scientific and historical disciplines into a single, accessible origin story – one that explores who we are, how we got here, how we are connected to everything around us, and where we may be heading.  Big History examines these connected histories on very large scales across long time frames through a multidisciplinary approach focused on both the history of the non-human world, and on the major adaptations and alterations in the human experience.

 

This Big History course will examine the past on the largest possible time scale: it begins with the origins of the universe, and goes on to tell a series of linked stories about the origins of stars and planets, of life on earth, the emergence of human beings, and the various types of human societies that have existed up to the present day. History on this sort of scale encourages each of us to consider our place in the global world of the twenty-first century, and to think of how we might contribute to the future of that world.  Both semesters of the course will be taught by Professor Benjamin, who is a leading big historian and a member of the Executive of the International Big History Association.  He will be joined throughout the course by many different professors from various academic disciplines who will bring their expertise to the course through a series of guest lectures. This course fulfills the General Education Program's Foundations (Historical Perspectives and Social Science Emphasis) and World Perspective (Culture Emphasis), and WRT 150 and one SWS designations. You will also learn how to research and write extensive and rigorous research essays in a range of scientific and historical subjects.

 

Food for Thought

Fall Semester: HNR 280 02 (Must also enroll in a section of Live, Learn, Lead)

Winter Semester: HNR 280 01 & 02 (SWS)

Schedule (Fall): MWF 12:00-12:50am HON 148

Schedule (Winter): MWF 11:00am-12:50pm HON 148

Fulfills: World Perspectives, History, SWS, US Diversity, Social Science, WRT 150 (w/ B or better)

Amy McFarland

If we are what we eat, why are we so removed from ourselves? This course examines food - from seed to waste and beyond - and its impact on our bodies, our wallets and our planet. Beginning with where our food comes from, this class will explore the cultural, scientific, and economic 'evolution' of our food systems - from the birth of modern agriculture to the patenting of genes and genetic modifications - we will investigate the causes and consequences of producing food for the ever-growing modern world. The course then will examine the choices we make, the true costs of food - - locally, regionally, nationally, and globally - - will be uncovered with special attention being paid to the social class inequality of those choices and their consequences. The final phase of the investigation delves into waste and excess and the hidden environmental, economic and social costs of excess. We will turn these lenses on our community and using what we discover, explore pathways to positive change.

 

Theory and Practice of Rights              

Fall Semester: HNR 280 section 09
Winter Semester: HNR 280 sections 09 and 10

Schedule (First semester): TR 4:00-5:15pm HON 220
Schedule (Second semester): TR 2:30-5:15pm HON 148

Fulfills: US Diversity, WRT 150, SWS, World Perspectives, HST 380, 2 Social Sciences (or 1 SS and 1 History), (Philosophy & Literature for transfers), WRT 150 (w/ B or better)

Karen Zivi, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Meijer Honors College

Pamela Galbraith, Adjunct Instructor, Anthropology Department

If the 1960s marked a “rights revolution” in the United States, the 21st century has been witness to that revolution’s expansion around the globe. But what are rights? Where do they come from? What do they do? And how do they work? This 3-course sequence takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of rights theory and practice. In the first semester, students will examine the philosophical meanings of and justifications for using rights to challenge political authority. The focus will be on 18th and 19th century European and American debates and conflicts, and particular attention will be given to questions of gender and race. In the second semester, students will examine rights philosophy and practice from a more contemporary and broader cross-cultural perspective with emphasis placed on assessing the benefits and limits of using rights language to address inequality and injustice in realms such as gender, sexuality, and health.

 

How to Love the World

Fall Semester: HNR 280 Section 13

Winter Semester: HNR 280 Sections 13 & 14

Schedule (Fall Semester): TR 10:00-11:15am HON 219

Schedule (Winter Semester): TR 8:30am-9:45am HON 218, 10:00-11:15am HON 214

Fulfills: Arts, Philosophy & Literature, History, WRT 150 (w/ B or better), SWS, World Perspectives, US Diversity

Patricia Clark, Professor of Writing

This is an interdisciplinary course that examines the art forms of painting and poetry as a means for inquiry into how we can live in the world as critical thinkers and active makers, with an abiding and deep connection with the earth and all its creatures, human and otherwise.  This course will use a multifaceted approach to its subject matter that will include reading, discussion, writing, painting, and class trips.

 

The premise of this course is that if we look closely at some artists (poets and painters) who profess to love the world--and we study the intimate details of their work--how they think, act, and create, as well as how they and others talk about their work-- we will learn something about ourselves, and how we can engage meaningfully with 'the world'--our lives; the beings, human and otherwise, around us; our professions.  --as well as learn about some poets and painters, and the social and historical contexts in which they work(ed). This course is not just about art and writing, but about history, spirituality, psychology, and philosophy.

 

How to Love the World 2

Fall Semester: HNR 280 Section 21

Schedule (Fall Semester): TR 8:30-9:45am HON 219

Jill Eggers, Professor

This is an interdisciplinary course that examines the art forms of painting and poetry as a means for inquiry into how we can live in the world as critical thinkers and active makers, with an abiding and deep connection with the earth and all its creatures, human and otherwise.  This course will use a multifaceted approach to its subject matter that will include reading, discussion, writing, painting, and class trips.

The premise of this course is that if we look closely at some artists (poets and painters) who profess to love the world--and we study the intimate details of their work--how they think, act, and create, as well as how they and others talk about their work-- we will learn something about ourselves, and how we can engage meaningfully with 'the world'--our lives; the beings, human and otherwise, around us; our professions.  --as well as learn about some poets and painters, and the social and historical contexts in which they work(ed). This course is not just about art and writing, but about history, spirituality, psychology, and philosophy.

 

National Security             

Fall Semester: HNR 280 Section 16 (must also enroll in a section of Live, Learn, Lead)

Winter Semester: HNR 280 Sections 17 and 18  

Schedule (Fall): TR 11:30am-12:45pm HON 220

Schedule (Winter): TR 11:30am-12:45pm & 1:00-2:15pm HON 148

Fulfills: History, 1 Social Science, HST 380, World Perspectives, WRT 150 (w/ B or better), SWS

Gleaves Whitney, Director, Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, History

Jonathan White, Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Honors College

The National Security Sequence is designed to teach you how to assess threats to United States security. It focuses on methods for gathering information and transforming it into intelligence. Topics include: history of national security, terrorism, unconventional and conventional war, chemical-radiological-biological-nuclear (CRBN) threats, qualitative and quantitative research methods, and applied lessons from military history. You will also participate in a simulated not-for-profit company that gathers and analyzes information for the United States’ Intelligence Community. The whole process culminates in the second semester when your research team will produce and present an actual threat assessment based on information available to the public. Guest lecturers will include former U.S. intelligence agents.

The first course in the fall will focus on research methods. You will learn to utilize research tools and how to gather information related to national security. You will also learn how to assess and analyze information and the processes for turning information into national security intelligence. You will be introduced to a year-long project where teams of interdisciplinary researchers will gather and analyze threats to the security of the United States. Two courses in the winter semester will build on the skills developed in the fall semester. First, you will complete a class covering historical intelligence-gathering techniques from the Revolutionary War to the present. You will enhance research skills by utilizing Hauenstein-Markle Collection of National Security and Intelligence. Second, you will continue the research project from the fall semester by conducting and presenting an actual threat assessment. If you choose, you may use this sequence to begin an interdisciplinary major in Liberal Studies with an emphasis in National Security Studies.

 

Urbanism  

Fall Semester:         HNR 280 23 (Must take a Live, Learn, Lead) 

Winter Semester:    HNR 280 21 & 22

Schedule (Fall):    MW 1:30-2:45pm HON 218

Schedule (Winter):   TR 2:30-3:45pm & TR 4:00-5:15pm EC 510

Fulfills:  History, Art, One Social Science, US Diversity, HST 380, WRT 150 (with a B or better) and SWS.

Melissa Morison, Associate Professor of Classics

Shirley Fleischmann, Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Matthey Daley, Associate Professor of History

Cathedrals or wastelands, solutions or nightmares, cities rank amongst the most fundamental political, economic, and socio-cultural phenomena of human society. We have built, modified, praised, and cursed our cities for thousands of years. Cities have become the primary tools used by more than half of the human beings on our planet to organize their shelter, food, water, government, education, religion, and entertainment.

But this was not always the case. What prompted the emergence of the earliest cities? Can it be true, as some scholars have suggested, that cities were an inevitable development? Can we imagine other viable long-term options? Is the “Age of Cities” coming to an end? In the first semester of the course (3 credits; Professor Morison), we will examine the city as “artifact,” analyzing the broad spectrum of ways that cities have developed and functioned across time and space. We will consider planning strategies, cultural and environmental interaction, infrastructure, meaning, form, and representation of the city in the visual arts. We will also use the Fall semester to develop an understanding of key theoretical approaches and the language of architectural and urban analysis.

Do cities solve problems? Create problems? Both? In the second semester of the course (6 credits;Professors Daley and Fleischmann), we will focus on developing answers to this question, applying knowledge developed in the Fall and using the city of Grand Rapids as a “lab” in which we’ll analyze a spectrum of modern urban structures and problems. Students will be introduced to basic mathematical models that will help them to better understand issues of structural engineering and energy efficiency. Students will also develop the ability to use local public archival resources effectively. We’ll conclude the year with a look at the decline of cities and the psychology / conceptualization of “ruins,” alongside a look at more theoretical predictions /suggestions for the future of urban life. To provide cohesion across the academic year, instruction in both semesters will engage with common themes such as: cities as solutions/problems; interaction of culture and nature; sustainability; diversity and social inequality; cross-cultural comparison. We will also look for opportunities to bring all instructors together for various activities, such as an ArtPrize “before and during” activity in the Fall.

 

 

Social Product Innovation (SPI)

Fall Semester: HNR 280 14 (Must take a Live, Learn, Lead.)

Winter Semester: HNR 280 15 & 16

Schedule (Fall Semester): W 3:00-5:50pm HON 148

Schedule (Winter Semester): TR 11:30am-2:15pm HON 219

Requirements Fulfilled: History, Art, SWS, World Perspectives, Social Science, WRT 150 (w/ B or better)

Paul Lane, Professor

Join us on a quest to find innovative, sustainable solutions to relevant world problems and become part of a close-knit community of engaging students and instructors!  This lively, multidisciplinary sequence includes a study of the past, present and future of innovation, as well as creative project-based research and development of products and services; energetic collaborative learning, discussion, and brainstorming; inspiring field trips and guest speakers; and optional social gatherings.  Students with diverse backgrounds and interests benefit from the course, as innovation flourishes when participants bring varied perspectives, experience, and training to the creation, development, and evaluation processes.  After completing Social Product Innovation, students may participate for academic credit in the annual trip to Nicaragua in May.

 

 

Glenn A. Niemeyer Learning and Living Center • Allendale MI 49401
Phone 616-331-3219 • honors@gvsu.edu