Art Courses

Some Honors students take a Foundational Interdisciplinary sequence that does not fuflfill the art requirements. In order to cover this requirement, we offer the following Honors Art Courses

Fall 2013

HNR 280 20: History of Collecting

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Honors Art

Eric Gollannek, Adjunct Instructor of Art

From the British Museums History of the World in 100 Objects to the Antiques Roadshow, artifacts and collections offer exciting ways to engage viewers with the past. What stories can we tell through artifacts and how have different collectors thought about objects over time? This course explores the history, theories, and practices of collecting focused on the cabinet of curiosity, art gallery, and public museum from the ancient world through to the present day. Hands on opportunities include fieldtrips to work with collections at GVSU as well as institutions such as the Grand Rapids Public Museum, Frederik Meijer Gardens, and Muskegon Museum of Art.

Winter 2014

HNR 280 20: Art and Empire

Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Honors Art, SWS

Eric Gollannek, Adjunct Instructor of Art

The notion of empire readily calls to mind thoughts of Imperial Rome and the British Raj. In the struggle to make sense of the new millennium, in a post-9/11 age of globalization, the term gained renewed currency as a way to understand the uneasy blend of cultural, political, military and economic power. This course explores the meaning of empire from the ancient world to the present day through attention to art, architecture, film, and music. Through critical readings and careful looking, we will examine how culture not only reflects imperial ambition and the power of central authority, but how art itself shaped such desires, testing the ideas of British artist William Blake who said, Empire follows art and not vice versa as Englishmen suppose.

HNR 280 19: Modernism
Schedule: TR 2:30-3:45
Requirements Fulfilled: Honors Art, SWS

Ellen Adams

This course addresses some of the significant movements and developments in art, literature, theater, and thought between 1860 and 1960. This period witnessed a radical expansion in the definition of artistic, literary, and other cultural practices as well as a search for new modes of expression. Debates in Europe and the United States will be discussed in relation to a historical framework of cultural changes brought about by capitalism, industrialization, war and revolution. We will consider the various meanings of modernism and will discuss a wide range of related issues, including the relationship between high art and mass culture; representations of sexual and racial identity; the social and political functions of cultural spaces and commentary; the evolving relationship between modern culture and its audience; and the concept of an avant-garde. Analysis of individual works of art, literature, film, music, and primary texts forms the basis of the course.