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Lack of fresh food linked to signs of heart disease

Lack of fresh food linked to signs of heart disease

A GVSU researcher says lack of access to fresh food may increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis.

GVSU study: Diversity on corporate boards brings value

GVSU study: Diversity on corporate boards brings value

Companies with boards made up of at least 25 percent women or minorities are the most profitable.

Study: Costs to care for stroke survivors rising

Study: Costs to care for stroke survivors rising

A new study shows caring for elderly stroke survivors now costs nearly $40 billion per year with patients needing 22 hours of care per week.

Professor receives grant to study honeybee population

Professor receives grant to study honeybee population

The project is funded by a portion of a $2.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Professor joins global flipped learning movement

Professor joins global flipped learning movement

Robert Talbert was recently named one of 12 Flipped Learning Global Initiative research fellows.

Superbug scare: GVSU faculty searching for solutions

Superbug scare: GVSU faculty searching for solutions

Several chemistry faculty members and their teams of students have been studying antibiotic-resistant bacteria for the past 10 years.

Professor dissecting Yooper dialect and identity

Professor dissecting Yooper dialect and identity

The culmination of Kathryn Remlinger's 16-year project is her forthcoming book, "Yooper Talk: Dialect as Identity in Michigan's Upper Peninsula."

Photo of Disruptive Knowledge exhibit.

Exhibit spotlights French Enlightenment controversy

A reception for "Disruptive Knowledge" will take place March 24, in the Mary Idema Pew Library.

What if Helen never fled to Troy?

What if Helen never fled to Troy?

Classics professor awarded grant to translate ancient play depicting alternate "Helen of Troy" story for modern audiences.

Most residents give Grand Rapids grade of A or B, study says

Most residents give Grand Rapids grade of A or B, study says

A new study released by the Johnson Center for Philanthropy at Grand Valley shows more than 80 percent of Grand Rapids area residents would give the city an overall grade of "A" or "B" as a place to live, but ratings varied widely based on home location, race, education and poverty level.