FALL 2010 EVENTS


EVENT CALENDAR

To view the schedule in Google calendar form, click here.

REGISTER FOR AN EVENT

To register, visit the seminar registration site.

EVENTS LISTED BY DATE

AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

AUGUST

Working Effectively with American Students
Friday, August 20, 9:30 - noon
167 Lake Ontario Hall

Alan Headbloom, Headbloom Cross-Cultural Communication

The workshop will include some PowerPoint slides, video clips of international faculty stories, and plenty of time for discussion of participant concerns. Designed for new faculty, but all international faculty are encouraged to attend. Topics will include:

American student traits and expectations
Breaking down barriers
Using the syllabus as a contract
Accessibility to students
Problems with language
Succeeding in the classroom
Discrimination
Getting support


Adjunct Academy
Saturday, August 21, 8:30 - 12:30
111D DeVos

Sessions led by part-time faculty, for faculty who teach part-time. This event takes place twice a year and provides faculty with an opportunity to come together, meet colleagues, learn teaching strategies and discuss ways to improve student learning.


Fall Conference on Teaching & Learning
Wednesday, August 25, 8:30 - 2:00
Eberhard Conference Center

Our annual all-faculty event. For a schedule and other details, click here.


Holland Teaching Academy - CANCELED Thursday, August 26, 5:30 - 8:30pm
GVSU Meijer Campus in Holland

An evening program devoted to teaching and learning. View the program here.


SEPTEMBER

Faculty/Staff Fridays in the Writing Center
Friday, September 3, noon - 5pm, Fred Meijer Center for Writing & Michigan Authors, 120 LOH

Join your colleagues for quiet writing time in the Fred Meijer Center for Writing. Make steady progress on a writing project and benefit from the focus and support that comes from writing among your colleagues - and away from the distractions of your home or office. We'll provide a work station, snacks, coffee, and tea. No reservations required.


Seasoned Educators Book Group
Thursday, September 9, 3 - 4pm, 2201 KC
Friday, September 10, 12 - 1pm, 303C DEV

Join other tenured faculty to discuss a book related to teaching and learning, either from the FTLC Reads list or of their own choosing. Christine Rener, Pew FTLC Director, will lead these initial meetings but a Teaching Circle convener will need to be chosen. Text selection and meeting schedules will be discussed at this initial meeting. If you are interested in joining but are unable to make one of these meetings, please contact renerc@gvsu.edu.


Research Assignment Design Workshop
Thursday, September 9, 1 - 2pm, 205A DEV
Friday, September 10, noon - 1pm, 111 HRY

Peter Coco & Hazel McClure, University Libraries

Help your students write better research papers by giving them better assignments. Recent studies show that the many otherwise effective research assignment handouts don't provide students with key guidance on how they should do their research. Assignments that provide that guidance can challenge students to critically engage with their research process and resist the temptations of plagiarism and “good enough." We’ll focus on practical techniques with applications across the curriculum and share the University Libraries' new Research Guidance Rubric for Assignment Design.


MAP-Works Training
Monday September 13, 3-4pm, 114 HRY
Thursday, September 16, 3-4pm, 114 HRY
Friday, September 17, 3-4pm, 114 HRY
Wednesday, September 22, 3-4pm, 114 HRY

During the one hour session participants will be able to have hands on training of the Map-Works system through a Demo site. The trainers for the sessions will guide participants through a series of case studies aimed at Faculty and Staff that will be using the Map-Works program. The training sessions will also allow participants to see the student result pages and individual student reports. This training session will help to prepare individuals for student follow up, system information gathering, and generating reports.


Informal Feedback at Mid-Semester
Tuesday, September 14, 3 - 4pm, 2259 KC
Wednesday, September 15, noon - 1pm, 202E DEV

Christine Rener, Pew FTLC

Four considerations for gathering student feedback will be presented. Feedback can be collected at any time during the semester using the techniques described. This session will also introduce a new FTLC service: Mid-Semester Interviews about Teaching (MIT), wherein an FTLC staff member visits your classroom, interviews your students about what is working well in the course and what could be improved, and then provides you with a summary report. Perspectives from a student panel will also be offered.
Session Handout


Integrating Library Resources into Blackboard (drop-in services)
Wednesday, September 15, noon - 3pm, Steelcase Library, 114A DEV
Thursday, September 16, noon - 3pm, Zumberge LIbrary, 305

Did you know that almost all the library’s online resources from e-books to course reserves to Library Guides, can be integrated directly into your Blackboard courses? Did you know that there are a variety of ways to promote information literacy with your liaison librarian without having to give up valuable class time? In this drop-in session, you’ll learn how to take advantage of the library resources both its people and collections for the benefits of your classes. Drop in for as little or as long as you need and work with a librarian and members from Educational Technology for a one-on-one session.


Faculty/Staff Fridays in the Writing Center
Friday, September 17, noon - 5pm, Fred Meijer Center for Writing & Michigan Authors, 120 LOH

Join your colleagues for quiet writing time in the Fred Meijer Center for Writing. Make steady progress on a writing project and benefit from the focus and support that comes from writing among your colleagues - and away from the distractions of your home or office. We'll provide a work station, snacks, coffee, and tea. No reservations required.


Internationalize Yourself, Your Classroom, Your GVSU: Information for Faculty on Expanding Horizons
Tuesday, September 21, noon - 1pm, 2201 KC
Wednesday, September 22, noon - 1pm, 303C DEV

Mark Schaub, Executive Director of the Padnos International Center, will provide an overview of international programs at GVSU, including:

1. How to advocate for Study Abroad and how to advise students about the process for study abroad
2. Internationalizing your courses and your curriculum
3. International travel grants available for faculty
4. Accompanying students abroad
5. Welcoming international scholars and students to GVSU and into your classrooms


Google Like a Librarian
Monday, September 27, noon - 1:30pm, 205A DEV
Tuesday, September 28, 1 - 2:30pm, 111 HRY

Colleen Lyon & Mary O'Kelly, University Libraries

Your students are using. You are using it. Why not get the most out of Google tools? This workshop will show you some advanced tips and tricks for getting the most precise results from your Google searches. We will show you how to use Google Docs to collaborate with colleagues and students. We'll also cover the use of Google Scholar and Google Books for scholarly research. Workshop participants will benefit from learning more efficient and effective techniques for web searching and research, and from an increased understanding of the collaborative nature of many Google tools. Participants in this workshop:
  -will know how to use the advanced search option in Google
  -will set up a Google account and know how to create, edit, share and upload files
  -will learn what Google Scholar and Google Books are, and how they and their students can use those tools for research


Introducing Google Docs into the Classroom and Our Professional Work
Monday, September 27, 1 - 2:30pm, 113A DEV
Wednesday, September 29, 3 - 4:30pm, 111 HRY

Charlie Lowe, Writing

This workshop provides strategies for using Google Docs for student projects, in classroom management, and with the work that teachers do as writing professionals. The workshop will include some hands-on experience with using the word processor, spreadsheet, and presentation applications in Google Docs.

Writing Course Objectives
[Tuesday, September 28, 3:30 - 4:30pm]
CANCELLED - TO BE RESCHEDULED
 

Are you redesigning a course? Proposing a new one?
Are you serving as an assessment coordinator in your unit?

If you answered YES or MAYBE to one of these questions, please join us for this hand-on, practical workshop about crafting clear and reasonable course objectives. This workshop will be led by Julie Guevara, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Holly VanScoy, President of Academic Research Associates.


Is This the Right Technology for My Class? Discussion Group
Tuesday, September 28, 4:30 - 6pm, 107C DEV

Ron Garrett, Professor of Engineering

A series of informal discussions designed to focus on the needs of faculty in the beginning stages of developing strategies for the use of technology in the classroom. These are NOT hands-on sessions, but discussions that will address important pedagogical issues related to use of technology for face-to-face classes. The faculty will be surveyed from time to time so that their needs can be identified and addressed. Ron Garrett, will facilitate the discussions and staff from Educational Technology will be available. Come only once or return as many times as you like. Since the format is informal, you may arrive late or leave early if you wish.
 

Critical Thinking:  Designing Instructional Strategies to Promote Critical Thought Webinar
Wednesday, September 29, 1-3pm, KC 1142

Dr. Enoch Hale, Fellow, Foundation and Center for Critical Thinking

Part One of Three: Introduction to Foundational Critical Thinking Concepts and Principles

In this first segment, participants will be introduced to a robust, cross-disciplinary conception of critical thinking. We will discuss what critical thinking is and explore how it can be substantively infused into our content areas and instructional contexts. It will be argued that critical thinking is not something that is merely added to our existing curriculum and workload, but should be the way we teach and learn. When critical thinking is treated as the organizing idea of teaching and learning substantive understanding will naturally result. This webinar will be archived online for future access. Please contact the FTLC for details.


Building Service-Learning Programs: 10 Essentials, Webinar
Thursday, September 30, 12:45 - 3:00pm, 2270 KC
 

Join representatives from the Community Service Learning Center and FTLC for a video online seminar facilitated by Barbara Jacoby, Ph.D., a widely recognized service-learning scholar. The seminar will examine the 10 essentials for building service-learning programs including effective community partnerships, collecting the right data to prove success in service-learning, and successful service-learning programs across disciplines and campus. All faculty and staff interested in being a part of the service-learning conversation at GVSU are encouraged to attend! Participants are welcome to bring their own lunch to the seminar.


OCTOBER

Faculty/Staff Fridays in the Writing Center
Friday, October 1, noon - 5pm, Fred Meijer Center for Writing & Michigan Authors, 120 LOH

Join your colleagues for quiet writing time in the Fred Meijer Center for Writing. Make steady progress on a writing project and benefit from the focus and support that comes from writing among your colleagues - and away from the distractions of your home or office. We'll provide a work station, snacks, coffee, and tea. No reservations required.

 

Critical Thinking:  Designing Instructional Strategies to Promote Critical Thought Webinar
Tuesday, October 5, 1-3pm, KC 1142

Dr. Enoch Hale, Fellow, Foundation and Center for Critical Thinking

Part Two of Three: Question Generating Concepts

The critical mind is the questioning mind. The extent to which students ask genuine questions and seek to answer them reflects the extent to which students take content seriously and think it through. The problem is that our students rarely know how to systematically ask questions that probe content by searching out assumptions, concepts, purposes, information, inferences and solutions, points of view, or implications. They rarely seek out intellectual standards to evaluate the quality of their thought and the thoughts of others: questions that target clarity, depth, relevance, validity, significance, and accuracy. We want to create a classroom culture where students actively, reflectively, and fair-mindedly question the content and each other. Such a culture cultivates important intellectual skills and abilities as well as virtuous dispositions like intellectual flexibility, empathy, humility, integrity, open-mindedness, and perseverance to name a few. This session will focus on the relationship between our ability to question and our ability to think critically. Participants will explore various ways to help students develop questions that analyze and evaluate content and their thinking. This webinar will be archived online for future access. Please contact the FTLC for details.


Finding Digital Media to Enhance Teaching & Learning
Tuesday, October 5, 1 - 2:30pm, 111 HRY
Friday, October 8, noon - 1:30pm, 205A DEV

Did you know that the library subscribes to resources that have audio and video streaming? Interested in learning how to locate television episodes, newscasts, documentaries or youtube videos that you can embed directly into Blackboard? In this hands-on workshop, you will be introduced to a variety of free and subscription resources that can be used to enhance your course content.


Understanding Study Abroad Transfer Credit: A New Guide for Faculty
Thursday, October 7, 10 - 11am, 2201 KC

Rebecca Hambleton, Director of Study Abroad & International Partnerships.

This workshop focuses on guiding faculty through part of the study abroad advising process and providing information on study abroad transfer credit policies. The main goal of this session is to provide information on how we can better assist study abroad participants in meeting degree requirements, while maintaining academic integrity through the review of overseas course options. New materials will be presented at this session for those who are new to the study abroad credit review process and for those who have years of experience. This session is ideal for department chairs and other faculty and staff who routinely review overseas course descriptions.
Online Education Open Forum
Thursday, October 7, 3 - 4pm, 2201 KC
Friday, October 8, 9 - 10am, 488C DEV
Friday, October 8, 10:30 - 11:30am, 240 CHS
 
Join representatives from the Provost Office, FTLC, University Curriculum Committee, and Educational Technology for a conversation about the recent changes related to online education at Grand Valley. The new Online Education Council and new faculty development programming to support online education will be discussed.


Collaborative Learning
Friday, October 8, 10 - 12, 2201 KC
Friday, October 8, 3 - 5pm, 202E DEV

Dr. Ellen Yezierski, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Miami University, Oxford, OH

This workshop will provide participants with the tools and starting time to modify an existing course to incorporate collaborative learning approaches. Participants should identify such a course and bring an electronic version of its current syllabus. Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop.


The Perils and Pleasures of Publishing
Monday, October 11, 12 - 1pm, 303C DEV
Tuesday, October 12, 12 - 1pm, 2201 KC

Alice Chapman, History
Catherine Frerichs, Writing
Azizur Molla, Anthropology
Rachel Powers, Chemistry

Faculty will discuss their experiences in publishing, covering topics such as staying on task, building on previous work, and working (effectively!) with publishers and editors. Participants will leave, motivated and reassured to continue their own work.


How Shall We Grade Writing? Moving Beyond Rubrics
Monday, October 11,1 - 2:30pm, 2263 KC
Wednesday, October 13, 1 - 2:30pm, 303C DEV

Nancy Patterson, Associate Professor College of Education, Literacy Studies Program Chair

Rubrics have been a part of teachers’ realities for a generation and have represented not only the promise of more authentic means of assessing writing, but a mechanism that would be efficient and quick. Yet, for many, rubrics have not fulfilled these promises. This workshop will first explore some of the problems that rubrics create and suggest alternatives that recognize the complex processes through which writing happens. Participants will have the opportunity to work in small groups and explore the issues involved in their discipline-specific writing forms.
 

Critical Thinking:  Designing Instructional Strategies to Promote Critical Thought Webinar
Tuesday, October 12, 1-3pm, KC 1142

Dr. Enoch Hale, Fellow, Foundation and Center for Critical Thinking

Part Three of Three: Focus on Instructional Strategies that Promote Critical Thought
 
This session will build on the foundational critical thinking concepts and principles addressed in the first session. In doing so, participants will explore the intimate relationship between what it means to think critically and how we can design instruction to promote critical thought. Based on best practices in teaching and learning, participants will engage and discuss specific instructional strategies designed to foster critical thought and the cultivation of higher order thinking skills. The instructional strategies act as examples of what instructors can do on a typical day of class, so at the end of the session participants should have a short list of practical strategies they can immediately incorporate into their instruction.This webinar will be archived online for future access. Please contact the FTLC for details.


Faculty/Staff Fridays in the Writing Center
Friday, October 15, noon - 5pm, Fred Meijer Center for Writing & Michigan Authors, 120 LOH

Join your colleagues for quiet writing time in the Fred Meijer Center for Writing. Make steady progress on a writing project and benefit from the focus and support that comes from writing among your colleagues - and away from the distractions of your home or office. We'll provide a work station, snacks, coffee, and tea. No reservations required.


21 Things for the 21st Century
Friday, October 15, 1 - 2:30pm, 205A DEV

Barbara LaBeau, College of Education

There is a need for knowledge of Web 2.0 applications to function in the technological world of the 21st century. This workshop will cover a variety of applications that are available online, free and for use for professional and personal use. Based on " 21 Things for the 21st Century Learning," this is the workshop that will serve all faculty who want to know more about how to use Web 2.0 in teaching.


Preparing a Personnel Portfolio
Tuesday, October 19, 3 - 4pm, 2201 KC
Wednesday, October 20, 12 - 1pm, 303C DEV

Christine Rener, Pew FTLC

In this hands-on workshop we will discuss key issues in creating portfolios including purpose, audience(s) and tone. Evaluation of course materials for inclusion in the portfolio as well as crafting of compelling integrative statements will be discussed. This session is appropriate for those in the early stages of portfolio preparation. A parallel session will be held for those desiring feedback on portfolio materials being prepared for submission in January, 2011. Registrants will be contacted about their needs prior to the session.
HANDOUT


Is This the Right Technology for My Class? Discussion Group
Tuesday, October 19, 4:30 - 6pm, 107C DEV

Ron Garrett, Professor of Engineering

A series of informal discussions designed to focus on the needs of faculty in the beginning stages of developing strategies for the use of technology in the classroom. These are NOT hands-on sessions, but discussions that will address important pedagogical issues related to use of technology for face-to-face classes. The faculty will be surveyed from time to time so that their needs can be identified and addressed. Ron Garrett, will facilitate the discussions and staff from Educational Technology will be available. Come only once or return as many times as you like. Since the format is informal, you may arrive late or leave early if you wish.


Developing Intercultural Competence: Skills for the 21st Century
Wednesday, October 20, 3 - 4:30pm, 2259 KC
Thursday, October 21, 12 - 1:30pm, 302E DEV

Dee Ann Sherwood Bosworth, Director of Intercultural Training
Christine Rener, Pew FTLC

This 90-minute workshop focuses on developing intercultural knowledge and skills in various processes of thought, dialogue and interactions. Participants will build on their knowledge of basic dimensions of intercultural differences in communication and practice their new skills using case studies presenting classroom scenarios.
 
Teaching Fundamentals for Online/Hybrid Course Delivery
2-sessions: October 22 & October 29 from 1:00 - 5:00. (DeVos campus)
4-sessions: November 5, 12, 19 and December 3 from 1:00 - 3:00. (Allendale campus)
 

This is an 8-hour workshop, divided into either 2 sessions or 4 sessions. Please sign-up by going to http://www.gvsu.edu/seminar and choosing the Teaching & Learning category. 

In this series we will discuss the basics for developing a course with the online or hybrid designation.  Designed to provide a starting point and to meet the requirements stated in the faculty handbook, we will orient you with resources and tools to begin your planning process with a foundation of quality standards.  Offered in different time-formats, all 8 hours of the series are required. For additional details, please visit the IT website.


Extending the Conversation: Integrating Online Discussion
October 25 – November 5
Hybrid format: Initial meeting in-seat, the remainder online.

Glenna Decker, Educational Technology

In this two week online workshop, we will discuss best pedagogical practices for integrating online discussion whether to extend class dialogue beyond the classroom or for an online/hybrid course. We will consider student engagement, prompts/question types, assessment and feedback, and management, as well as other topics. This will be an interactive workshop and participants are expected to fully participate and contribute to the discussion several times each week.

In-seat meeting: Monday, October 25
3:00p.m. – 4:30p.m.
191 CHS

We will begin our workshop meeting together to set a foundation for the following two weeks. The 90-minute format provides a one-hour content kick-off, followed by a 30-minute hands-on session for those who need an introduction or refresher for using the discussion board (participants who do not need this are welcome to stay or leave.)


Preparing a Pew FTLC Grant Proposal
Wednesday, October 27, 12 - 1pm, 303C DEV
Thursday, October 28, 9 - 10am, 2201 KC

Kurt Ellenberger, Pew FTLC

Who should attend?
• Any faculty member who wants to know about the many grant offerings available in FTLC.
• Faculty planning to apply for a competitive grant, February 1 or April 1.
• Anyone interested in finding out more about the process and the types of projects supported in the past.
• As time permits there will be a discussion of individual projects.

What kinds of projects are funded?
We’ve funded everything from the purchase of animal skulls and bacteria to comprehensive curricular revisions. These grants can help you to:
• develop new and innovative pedagogies for a course, a series of courses, a degree, or an entire program.
• purchase materials for your classroom that are above and beyond your department’s normal expenditures.
• course revision, degree revision.
• develop a new degree, new minor, or a pilot program.

What if your project has elements of your own research agenda?
These grants are focused primarily on teaching, but that does not disqualify proposals in which teaching and scholarship/creative activity intersect. In fact, we encourage faculty to use their scholarship and creative activities to inform and enliven their teaching whenever possible, and we support this Teacher Scholar model in our grant program.


Faculty/Staff Fridays in the Writing Center
Friday, October 29, noon - 5pm, Fred Meijer Center for Writing & Michigan Authors, 120 LOH

Join your colleagues for quiet writing time in the Fred Meijer Center for Writing. Make steady progress on a writing project and benefit from the focus and support that comes from writing among your colleagues - and away from the distractions of your home or office. We'll provide a work station, snacks, coffee, and tea. No reservations required.


NOVEMBER

"Grand Valley Stories: Building a More Inclusive Community," Interactive Theatre Event
Tuesday, November 2, 4 - 6pm, Cook-DeWitt Center, Allendale Campus
Wednesday, November 3, 4 - 6pm, Loosemore Auditorium, DeVos Center, Pew Campus

An original production that utilizes eclectic performance elements and styles (theatre, dance, music, etc.) to depict classroom dynamics, student/faculty experiences, departmental culture and climate and staff work life at Grand Valley State University.

Working with a diverse ensemble of GVSU students, faculty and staff, interviews will be conducted and formed into a theatrical production that reflects relatable student, faculty and staff experiences at Grand Valley. Talk-backs, led by the director and others, will explore audience reactions and perspectives. Sponsored by Inclusion & Equity Division, Office of Multicultural Affairs and Pew FTLC. Free and open to the public.
 
Using Assessment Measures: Following Through on Your Goals and Objectives
Thursday, November 4, 10-11:30am, 2201 KC
 
Julie Guevara, Academic Assessment and Accreditation Officer
Holly VanScoy, President of Academic Research Associates
 

Please join us for a special workshop on assessment measures. We will address definitions of measures, how to write measures, how to determine appropriate measures, and how measures differ from tasks. Session facilitators will be Dr. Julie Guevara, our very own Academic Assessment and Accreditation Officer and Dr. Holly Van Scoy, President of Academic Research Associates.


Inclusion and Diversity in the Classroom
Tuesday, November 9, 3 - 4pm, 2259 KC
Wednesday, November 10, 12 - 1pm, 202E DEV

Kathleen VanderVeen, Director, Disabilities Support Services
Marlene Kowalski-Braun, Director, Women's Center

This interactive workshop will explore strategies for creating inclusive classrooms. Through the use of case studies, faculty members will explore cultural triggers and how to react to them in the classroom to optimize learning and student development. Participants will learn strategies to handle cultural conflicts in the classroom while welcoming students' multiple identities and perspectives.


Understanding Backward Design for Course (Re)Development
Thursday, November 11, 3 - 4:30pm, 111 HRY
Friday, November 12, 2 - 3:30, 205A DEV

Glenna Decker, Educational Technology

Understanding by Design is a framework for course development that aligns assessment with instruction. It provides a process for rethinking instructional practices that are effective for developing student understanding. Using the framework developed by Wiggins & McTighe, in this workshop we will apply the principles of Backward Design to course development. This strategy for developing any course or aspect of a course is useful for all delivery methods, and may be especially timely for those developing and teaching online and hybrid courses. Participants are asked to bring a syllabus. Using it, we will analyze one or more aspects of your course to which we will apply Backward Design. Participants will leave with at least one clear example from their own course and an ability to apply it to others.


Faculty/Staff Fridays in the Writing Center
Friday, November 12, noon - 5pm, Fred Meijer Center for Writing & Michigan Authors, 120 LOH

Join your colleagues for quiet writing time in the Fred Meijer Center for Writing. Make steady progress on a writing project and benefit from the focus and support that comes from writing among your colleagues - and away from the distractions of your home or office. We'll provide a work station, snacks, coffee, and tea. No reservations required.


Conducting Productive Meetings
Tuesday, November 16, 12 - 1pm, 2259 KC
Wednesday, November 17, 3 - 4pm, 302E DEV

Christine Rener, Pew FTLC

As someone who has spent a lot of time in meetings, I have often wondered why the default length of a meeting is one hour. Why not thirty minutes? Reducing the length of meetings can improve university sustainability in terms of time, money, and productivity. This session will address four strategies to increase the efficiency and overall productivity of any meeting.


Is This the Right Technology for My Class? Discussion Group
Tuesday, November 16, 4:30 - 6pm, 107C DEV

Ron Garrett, Professor of Engineering

A series of informal discussions designed to focus on the needs of faculty in the beginning stages of developing strategies for the use of technology in the classroom. These are NOT hands-on sessions, but discussions that will address important pedagogical issues related to use of technology for face-to-face classes. The faculty will be surveyed from time to time so that their needs can be identified and addressed. Ron Garrett, will facilitate the discussions and staff from Educational Technology will be available. Come only once or return as many times as you like. Since the format is informal, you may arrive late or leave early if you wish.
Developing and Assessing Effective Partnerships in Service Learning and Civic Engagement
Thursday, November 18, 3:00-4:30 p.m., Kirkhof Center 1104
As interest and programs in service-learning and civic engagement continue to increase at colleges and universities so does the need to work collaboratively to provide the most beneficial and engaging experiences for students. The success of any service-learning or civic engagement project starts with the development and nurturing of strong partnerships. This webinar will focus on how to develop, sustain, and evaluate staff/faculty partnerships in service-learning and civic engagement.  Although focused in service-learning and civic engagement much of the material shared can be applied to other types of collaborations as well.
 
Specific webinar outcomes include identifying and discussing:
  • Best approaches for recruiting faculty or staff supporters and collaborators
  • Important steps in building collaborative and democratic relationships
  • Finding solutions to the common barriers that can arise in partnerships
  • How to evaluate and sustain the health of the partnership/collaboration over time
 
Speaker
Marshall Welch, Director of the Catholic Institute for Lasallian Social Action, Saint Mary's College of California
 
Dr. Marshall Welch, has taught service-learning courses in education and civic engagement for over 10 years. Dr. Welch served as the Director of the Lowell Bennion Community Service Center at the University of Utah for 6 years and now is the Director of the Catholic Institute for Lasallian Social Action (CILSA) at Saint Mary's College of California. His background and experience makes him familiar with the complexities and dynamics of large, public research universities and small, faith-based liberal arts colleges. He helped develop an annual Campus Compact summer institute for community service directors and makes presentations and workshops around the country and internationally. His background and expertise include working with faculty to develop service-learning courses, assisting community service-directors in program development, understanding the culture and politics of higher education, establishing and maintaining partnerships with community agencies, reflection techniques, and integrating spirituality into service-learning.
 
This Webinar is produced by NASPA (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators) and is hosted at GVSU by the Community Service Learning Center.
 
Please contact Valerie Jones (jonesval@gvsu.edu, 331-2345) for more information.
 


DECEMBER

Teaching to Develop Critical Thinking
Thursday, December 2, 12 - 1pm, 302E DEV
Friday, December 3, 2 - 3pm, 1104 KC

Christine Rener, Pew FTLC

In this hands-on session, we will discuss crafting assignments and providing feedback to students in order to stimulate critical thinking. Examples will include class discussions, writing assignments, and other types of classroom activities applicable to a range of disciplines.


SEMESTER CALENDARS

Fall 2010 Winter 2011
Fall 2009 Winter 2010
Session Descriptions
Fall 2008 Winter 2009

 

Draft Email Announcement

Page last modified March 14, 2014