Across Campus

KCON students give poster presentations 

Nursing students present posters that focus on notable nurses in the Cook-DeVos Center for Health Sciences.

It was a look at the past while practicing for the future.

Students in introductory nursing courses presented posters April 16-17 that focused on notable nurses who were important historically or made an impact on contemporary nursing. The presentations were held in the Cook-DeVos Center for Health Sciences.

Joy Washburn, associate professor of nursing, said the exercise serves two purposes. It gives the students an opportunity to practice presentation skills and learn more about their professional field.

“It’s the people who don’t get a lot of press,” Washburn said. “The ordinary people who do extraordinary things.”

Sarah Thornton studied Ildura Murillo-Rohde, an Hispanic nurse who practiced in the 1960s and ’70s. Murillo-Rohde founded the National Association of Hispanic Nurses and Thornton learned she often used her own money to fund the organization’s expenses.

“It showed me that when people have a passion for what they are doing, they will keep going at it,” Thornton said.

Andrew Kuiper researched Russell Tranbarger, who earned a nursing degree in 1959. “He faced a lot of opposition in the beginning as a male nurse,” Kuiper said.

 

Art2Park winner announced 

Halston Raddatz accepts a plaque from Police Chief Renee Freeman for having the winning design in the Art2Park Parking Permit Contest.

Halston Raddatz, a sophomore majoring in computer science, is the winner of the Art2Park Parking Permit Contest sponsored by the Grand Valley Police Department.

Students were asked to design a GVSU parking permit that will appear on about 15,000 vehicles for the 2014-2015 academic year.

Raddatz received a plaque from Police Chief Renee Freeman that showcases his design. He will also receive a free parking permit for next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Valley ranks high in national recycling contest 

Students gather and weigh materials that will be composted or recycled; Grand Valley finished 34th in Recyclemania.

Grand Valley ranked first in the state and in the top 35 nationwide (for universities with more than 20,000 students) in the composting and waste minimization categories of Recyclemania.

The eight-week competition aims to reduce waste and increase student awareness about the importance of recycling. More than 460 colleges and universities representing more than 5.3 million students participated in the competition that took place from January 19-March 29.

Grand Valley took 34th place in the nation, up from 46th last year, in the waste minimization category, and took 29th place in the nation, up from 33rd last year, in the food service organics category. More than 183,000 pounds were recycled and more than 295,000 pounds were composted during the competition. In total, nearly 479,000 pounds were diverted from the waste stream.

“Grand Valley has made sustainability one of our core values,” said Steve Leeser, operations supervisor for Facilities Services. “We have many faculty, staff and students who are passionate about sustainability. As well as we have done in the past, we could easily increase our national ranking if everyone participated.”

Leeser said the university has invested in making attractive containers available all over campus to make recycling and composting convenient and easy.

This is the sixth year Grand Valley has competed in Recyclemania. Campus Dining, Housing, Sustainable Community Development Initiative and Pew Campus Operations helped Facilities Services during the contest.

 

Wayfinding project seeks participants 

Researchers from the Kirkhof College of Nursing and Saint Mary’s Health Care are looking for adults ages 62 and older who would like to participate in a research project.

The researchers are trying to find out how to improve the design of buildings, like senior housing communities, so that they are easier for residents to find their way around.

Participants must be 62 years or older, have mild cognitive impairment or early stage Alzheimer’s disease, good vision with glasses or contact lenses, and be able to see colors.

For more information about project details, contact Cathy Weisbeck at (616) 331-5669 or by email at weisbeca@gvsu.edu.

Page last modified April 18, 2014