Across Campus

March 30, 2015

 
 
 

Students participate in interprofessional event

Students from Grand Valley’s College of Health Professions collaborated with their peers from three other institutions for an annual interprofessional event March 18.

The event was held simultaneously at the Cook-DeVos Center for Health Sciences, Michigan State University-College of Human Medicine, and Ferris State University College of Pharmacy.

Approximately 180 students were divided into groups that included representatives from physician assistant studies, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech language pathology, pharmacy, medicine and nursing. The groups were given a case study to discuss. 

“The goal of interprofessional education is for students to learn with, from and about other health professions, and the students enjoy the conversational aspect of working through a case together,” said Andrew Booth, assistant professor and chair of physician assistant studies.

Denise Ludwig, associate professor of speech language pathology, said one objective from the day was to have students recognize the expertise other professions bring to patient care. Ludwig used feeding as an example.

“Speech language pathologists, dietitians and physical therapists will all have techniques about feeding a patient,” Ludwig said. “In a patient-centered team approach, you learn to build consensus among the techniques.”

Katie Axford, from Ferris State University, brought about 20 pharmacy students. She said West Michigan is very fortunate to have many health profession programs within a relatively small area.

“This type of event helps students understand the backgrounds of other fields and understand the roles of the professionals,” Axford said.

Nursing students from Muskegon Community College also participated.

An interprofessional event at the Cook-DeVos Center for Health Sciences

Photo by Bernadine Carey-Tucker

An interprofessional event at the Cook-DeVos Center for Health Sciences drew students from Grand Valley, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Muskegon Community College.

 
 
 

Liberal Studies Students

Liberal studies students who built cardboard arcade games for a February 27 challenge raised $100 for the Imagination Foundation. Over the past two years, students in John Kilbourne’s classes have raised more than $600 by hosting an arcade game challenge each semester.

 
 
 

Students finish training for national fellowship program

The Gerald R. Ford International Airport has an important role in the local economy, supporting more than 40,000 jobs in West Michigan, according to associate dean and economics professor Paul Isely.

Isely worked with airport officials for six months gathering data for the economic study.

The study found the airport supports or contributes more than 40,000 additional jobs in West Michigan, with 25 percent of these jobs directly related to the airport, airport-dependent businesses and visitors. Additionally, the airport adds $3.1 billion in economic output, equivalent to 5.8 percent of the areas surrounding Kent County.

“The responses by local firms showed that not only did the airport have the traditional economic impact generated by aviation and visitor spending, but also significantly affected local business activity not directly related to the airport,” said Isely.

Pictured from left are Kevin McCurren, executive director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Leah Bauer, Kathryn Christopher and Paul Plotkowski, dean of the Padnos College of Engineering and Computing.

Photo by David Chrenko

Pictured from left are Kevin McCurren, executive director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Leah Bauer, Kathryn Christopher and Paul Plotkowski, dean of the Padnos College of Engineering and Computing. 

The study found the Gerald R. Ford International Airport supports or contributes:

• 40,311 additional jobs in West Michigan;

• $3.1 billion in economic output, equivalent to 5.8 percent of the areas surrounding Kent County;

• Visitors from outside the region who directly spend $418 million;

• Construction that creates 271 jobs during an average year for the last 25 years;

• Businesses and governmental units located at the airport contribute $212 million directly to the West Michigan economy;

• An estimated 6,500 households located within one hour of the airport that would have chosen not to live there without an airport like the Gerald R. Ford International Airport.

 
 
 

New director selected to lead Meijer Office of Fellowships

Elizabeth Lambert has been selected to serve as the new director of the Meijer Office of Fellowships.

Lambert will begin her term on June 15.

Lambert comes to Grand Valley from Indiana University where she served as a senior consultant, proposal trainer and adviser. She was responsible for developing curriculum and training students and staff in effective grant-writing, discipline-specific academic writing and proposal development. She also worked to promote fellowships, internship and study abroad opportunities while assisting underrepresented students apply for global initiatives and fellowship programs.

Lambert has extensive experience with fellowships and awards, having helped more than 150 students obtain more than $5 million in fellowships since 2012 and having completed more than a dozen fellowships of her own.

“Elizabeth Lambert brings a wealth of experience both in personally applying for — and obtaining — prestigious fellowships, and in helping others to be successful in her advising work at the University of Indiana,” said Jeff Chamberlain, director of the Meijer Honors College. “She is ready and eager to step right in to the role of director, and we are excited to see how our students profit from working with her.”

Lambert will replace Amanda Cuevas, who served as the office’s founding director for five years.

“It is hard to imagine how anyone could have been more effective as a founding director,” Chamberlain said. “Amanda is one of the most student-centered people I have ever known, and she has a knack at connecting students to the right resources and fellowships, and for mentoring them through the process of applying. It’s hard to argue with her success since she helped students bring in over $5 million worth of fellowships in her five-year tenure.”

For more information, visit gvsu.edu/fellowships.