Film and Video Production

 

Be sure to meet with your advisor!

To find out who your advisor is, go to MyBanner > Student > Student Records > View Major and Advisor Information

To find your advisor's office location and hours, go to FACULTY.

 

COURSE CHECKLIST
This checklist will help you keep track of your degree requirements.

 
SCHEDULING WORKSHEET

This worksheet will help you work out your registration plan.



Sample 4-Year Plan for Bachelor of Arts

Sample 4-Year Plan for Bachelor of Science

 

FILM & VIDEO PRODUCTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Current Catalog Description
 


SECONDARY ADMISSION POLICY FOR FILM & VIDEO MAJORS

In order to maintain high-quality instruction, the Film & Video Production major limits the number of students accepted each year into the major.  Students who have been accepted into the major through the Secondary Admission process are then allowed to take CFV 226 and all 300- and 400- level film/video courses.

In order to apply for Secondary Admission, students are required to achieve a minimum 3.0 GPA in the two Film/Video pre-admission courses (CFV 123 and 125) and a 2.5 GPA for their overall courses. Other requirements and achievements are necessary.  View all application guidelines at: ADMISSION POLICY & GUIDELINES


CFV 370 REQUIREMENT (catalog years before 2013-2014)

All FVP majors with a catalog year before 2013-14 are required to take CFV 370. CFV 370 topics rotate so be sure to check the current schedule on Banner. 

CFV 375 World Cinema can fulfill your CFV 370 requirement.


Fall 2014
CFV 370 01 American Cinema - TR  11:00 - 12:50 am

CFV 371 01 History of Animation - MW  3:00 - 4:50 pm

CFV 376 01 Latin American Cinema - T  6:00 - 8:50 pm

Winter 2015 
CFV 373 01 Issues of Representation - MW 10:00 - 11:50 am

CFV 375 01  World Cinema - 
MW 1:00 - 2:50 pm


COURSE PERMITS

Course permits are required for a variety of situations such as "permit only" courses, "majors only" courses, "course overload" permits, etc.  All course permits are placed online so you do not actually receive a hard copy of a permit.  

The type of permit needed determines who will place the permit online for you. In the case of "course overload" (aka "closed-class permit") ONLY the instructor can approve the permit.

If you receive a notice during registration regarding "majors only" then perhaps you have not declared yourself a Film & Video Production major and need to do so.

In order to take many of the "CFV" courses, you must formally declare yourself a Film & Video Production major.  You can declare your major on MyBanner > Student > Student Records > Change Major (this is located at the bottom of the menu.)

"Instructor Permission Only" permits are required in order to register for the following Film and Video Production courses:

CFV 328 Intermediate Film Practicum (Summer Film Project - First time SFP)

CFV 428 Advanced Film Practicum (Summer Film Project - Second time SFP)

CFV 399  Independent Study (these are reserved for RARE, UNIQUE situations)

CFV 490 Internship  For more information go to: Internships

CFV 498 Senior Project/Thesis  See Senior Projects/Thesis Seminar

 


••• FAQ •••

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

ADVISOR INFORMATION     B.S. / B.A.     EMPHASIS AREAS    GEN-ED/THEMES    INTERNSHIP   REGISTRATION     SECONDARY ADMISSION     SENIOR THESIS/PROJECTS     SWS REQUIREMENT     

 


How do I find out who my advisor is?
Login to myBanner > STUDENT RECORDS > VIEW MAJOR AND ADVISOR INFORMATION

Once I know who my advisor is, how do I find his/her office and open office hours?
On this Film & Video website, go to:  FACULTYThe office hours for each faculty member are listed.
    
How can I change my advisor?
Login to myBanner > STUDENT RECORDS > CHANGE MAJOR
     
What should I take with me to an advising session?
It is recommended that you take a completed Checklist  with you to your advising session.  You will want to visit your myPath evaluation in order to properly fill out your checklist.

Additionally, you should take all of the advising materials from previous advising sessions including notes, emails, transcripts, etc.  This is especially true for transfer students.
 
We highly recommend that you keep a folder with all advising notes and information in order to stay organized and to reference past conversations with all advisors.

What other resources are available for advising Film & Video majors?
The CLAS Academic Advising Center is located in C-1-140 MAK. To schedule an appointment, go into the Center, or give them a call at 616-331-8585.
Visit their website at: http://www.gvsu.edu/clasadvising/
     

 
When can I register?
Courses fill quickly, so it is very important that you register at the earliest time and date you are allowed.  To find your registration date and time, go to:  http://www.gvsu.edu/schedule/
 
HOT TIP!  Once you have noted all the courses you plan to register for, gather the CRN numbers and place them along side each of your choices (and back-up choices.)  
 
At the bottom of the ADD/DROP menu are boxes for the CRN #s you want to register for.  Simply place those numbers in each box and submit!  You are registered!  This means that you don't have to go into each discipline, find the course, and select the box and register, which takes a long time when courses are filling fast!
 
If there is a problem, the feedback will tell you how to handle it.
 


Do I have to take all of the School of Communications Core classes before applying to the Film & Video Production major?
No.  Only the two Film & Video Production pre-admission courses are required before applying to the major.  CFV 123 and CFV 125.
 
How do I apply to the Film & Video major once I've taken the pre-admission courses?
On this site, go to: Admission Policy and Guidelines in the main menu.  Your pre-admission course instructors will also discuss the application process each semester.
 
Is it okay to register for 200-level and above courses if I haven't applied to the Major yet?
Yes and No.  Since GVSU registers for the entire year at once, you'll want to plan carefully.   You should register with the assumption that you will get into the major once you are ready to apply.  So, If you plan to complete your pre-admission courses in Winter, then you should sign up for CFV 226/227, and other upper-level courses for the Summer or Fall.  And if you plan to complete your pre-admission courses in the Fall semester, then you should register for upper-level courses for the following Winter.
 
If you are denied admittance into the major, then you will discuss your schedule with your advisor at that time.
 
What should I take immediately after acceptance into the major?
It's important to take CFV 226 Media Production II and CFV 227 Digital Lab right away so plan your registration schedule accordingly. Also be sure to take CFV 261 Scriptwriting I as soon as possible. 
 
Study the schedule to become aware of when courses are offered.  For instance, Animation I is only offered in the Fall semester, so you'll want to register for that course for Fall. Then you will be ready to take Animation II in the Winter semester.
 
Try to get into your Foundation courses first (CFV 226/227, 261, and CBR 281) as outlined on the Checklist.
 
 

 
The ARTS Category
 
We recommend that our Film & Video majors not choose CFV 325 Film Culture for the ARTS category.
 
The benefit of General Education and Theme courses is that students have an opportunity to explore content from other disciplines. This ultimately results in an education with more depth and breadth, which plays a role in your ability to create meaningful films.
 
STUDY ABROAD    
Many of our students have benefited greatly from the opportunity for foreign travel by choosing to study abroad. Visit the Padnos International Center at 130 LOH, or click here for more information.
 

 
NOTE: You must receive a "C" or better (not C-) in order to fulfill the SWS requirement.
 
How do I choose my SWS courses?  
Keep in mind that your two required SWS courses may not be taken from the same discipline.  One must be from outside the student's major unit.
 
NOTE: As part of the SOC Core requirements, you could choose COM 215 Story Making.  You would receive credit for the SWS and Core requirements.
 
In addition, the Film & Video Foundation requires a History/Theory/Criticism course, so you may want to consider CFV 348 Film Theories. 
 
Both of these courses are great choices as a Film & Video major.  
  

      
 
Which degree should I choose, a B.S. or a B.A.?
This depends upon your interest and aptitude for speaking a foreign language. The Bachelor of Arts degree requires a three-semester proficiency in a foreign language.  Many students with high school experience with a language enjoy the opportunity to improve their knowledge and speaking skills with that language and to learn more about the corresponding culture/s.  Others choose a different language, having demonstrated an aptitude for speaking foreign languages. This is a good choice if you plan to continue your studies to attain a Graduate or PhD degree.
 
The Bachelor of Science degree requires that you complete a three-course cognate.  For Film & Video Production, you must complete either CS 150 Introduction to Computing or PHI 103 Logic, STA 215 Statistics, and COM 300 Foundations of Communication Research. 
 
NOTE!  PHI 103 and STA 215 are options for GenEd Math requirement so you can meet both requirements with these courses.
 
 
How do I register for Senior Thesis/Projects?
Students must complete a proposal and detailed timeline and submit it to the instructor prior to registration.  A permit is required for registration. See the Senior Thesis/Project menu for a full description of requirements.

Is it better to do a Senior Project or an Internship?
There are benefits to both, so this is a personal decision.  Senior Thesis/Projects offers the opportunity to strengthen your reel of personal work, or to finally write that research paper or script that you've been contemplating.  This is a good choice for those who want to take full advantage of being in college as making personal films becomes much more challenging once you have graduated.

An Internship provides the opportunity to connect with people in the industry and to observe an organization first hand.  This is a good choice for those who are ready to network and begin applying their skills in a professional environment.

If you plan to take Senior Thesis/Projects, you must propose your thesis paper, script, or film before you can register.  See the Senior Thesis/Project menu for a full description of requirements.

How many credits is a Senior Thesis/Project?
1 to 6 credits are possible with Senior Thesis/Project.  You'll want to discuss this with your advisor and consider how intensive the project is and also how many credits you still need to graduate.  120 credits are required to graduate, so plan accordingly.

INTERNSHIPS

How do I register for an Internship?
Once you have found an employer for your internship, you begin the process online.  Once you and your employer complete the online process, you will be notified as to when you are able to register.  Go to the Internship menu for full details.

Is it better to do an Internship or a Senior Project?
There are benefits to both, so this is a personal decision.  An Internship provides the opportunity to connect with people in the industry and to observe an organization first hand.  This is a good choice for those who are ready to network and begin applying their skills in a professional environment.

Senior Thesis/Projects offers the opportunity to strengthen your reel of personal work, or to finally write that research paper or script that you've been contemplating.  This is a good choice for those who want to take full advantage of being in college as making personal films becomes much more challenging once you have graduated.

How do I find an internship?
There are several ways to approach this.  You can begin by going to the Career Services office to receive help in preparing your resumé and cover letter, and to peruse the collection of internship opportunities that they have collected.

There are times when employers contact individual faculty and many times those are emailed to all FV students.  Other times faculty are aware of students who are looking for an internship and connect the employer and the student.  It's good to let all of your professors know that you are looking for an internship and what type of internship you would prefer.

The bottom line is that you are responsible for finding the internship and being resourceful and assertive will serve you well.

How many credits is an Internship?
1 to 6 credits are possible with an Internship.  This is directly related to how many hours you will work for your employer.  You'll want to discuss this with your employer and consider how intensive the internship will be and also how many credits you still need to graduate.  120 credits are required to graduate, so plan accordingly.  Go to the Internship menu for full details.

 








      
 

 

 

Page last modified March 10, 2014