Disability Support Resources

Guidelines for Diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)/Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

The office of Disability Support Resources (DSR) strives to insure that qualified persons with ADHD/ADD conditions are accommodated, and if possible, that the accommodations do not jeopardize successful therapeutic interventions.  The office does not modify requirements that are essential to the program of instruction or provide accommodations for persons whose impairments do not substantially limit one or more major life functions.

This form is designed to allow us to achieve these goals.  Persons who wish to receive academic adjustments due to ADHD/ADD need to have an ADHD/ ADD Verification Form filled out by a certified physician according to the following guidelines.  The physician completing the verification form must have first-hand knowledge of the person’s condition, must have experience diagnosing and treating the condition, and will be an impartial professional who is not related to the student. 

 

Guidelines for Diagnosis for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)/Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

A. Either (1) or (2)

(1) six or (or more) of the following symptoms of inattention have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is maladaptive and inconsistent with developmental level:

Inattention

  1. Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities
  2. Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
  3. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
  4. Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)
  5. Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
  6. Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework)
  7. Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools)
  8. Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
  9. Is often forgetful in daily activities

Suggested Instruments

  • Clinical interview (CI)
  • Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS)
  • Copland Symptom checklist for Adult Attention Deficit Disorders (CSCAADD)
  • Connors Rating Scale-Adult Norms (CRS)
  • Intelligence Test (WAIS-R, Woodcock-Johnson tests of Cognitive Ability (W.J), etc….)
  • The Tests of Variables of Attention Computer Program (TOVA)
  • Continuous Performance Test (CPT)
  • Gordon Diagnostic System (GDS)
  • Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST)
  • The Trail Making Tests (TMT)
  • Paced Auditory Serial Test (PASAT)
  • Attentional Capacity Test (ACT)
  • The Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS)
  • California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT)

(2) six (or more) of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impassivity have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is maladaptive and inconsistent with developmental level:

Hyperactivity

  1. Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
  2. Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected
  3. Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations win which it is inappropriate in adolescents or adults (may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness)
  4. Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly
  5. Is often “on the go” or often acts as if “driven by a motor”
  6. Often talks excessively

Impulsivity

  1. Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed
  2. Often has difficulty awaiting turn
  3. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)

Suggested Instruments

  • Clinical interview (CI)
  • Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS)
  • Copland Symptom checklist for Adult Attention Deficit Disorders (CSCAADD)
  • Connors Rating Scale-Adult Norms (CRS)
  • Intelligence Test (WAIS-R, Woodcock-Johnson tests of Cognitive Ability (W.J), etc….)
  • The Tests of Variables of Attention Computer Program (TOVA)
  • Continuous Performance Test (CPT)
  • Gordon Diagnostic System (GDS)
  • Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST)
  • The Trail Making Tests (TMT)
  • Paced Auditory Serial Test (PASAT)
  • Attentional Capacity Test (ACT)
  • The Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS)
  • California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT)
  • Kagen Matching Familiar Figure test (KMFFT)

B. Some of the hyperactive-impulsive or inattentive symptoms that caused impairment were present before age 7 years.

Suggested Instruments

  • Clinical interview (CI)
  • Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS)

C. Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g., at school [or work] and at home)

Suggested Instruments

  • Clinical interview (CI)
  • Reports from significant individuals in other setting who are in a position to judge symptoms (i.e. teachers or supervisors)

D. There must be clear evidence of clinically significant impairment in social, academic, or occupational functioning.

Suggested Instruments

  • Clinical interview (CI)
  • Reports from significant individuals in other setting who are in a position to judge symptoms (i.e. teachers or supervisors)

E. The symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of a Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Schizophrenia, or other Psychotic Disorder and are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g., Mood Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, or a Personality Disorder).

Suggested Instruments

  • Thematic Apperception Test (TAT)
  • Rorschach Inkblot Test (RIT)
  • Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2)

Code based on type:

314.01 – Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Combined

Type:  if both Criteria A1 and A2 are met for the past six months.

314.00 – Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Inattentive

Type:  if Criteria A1 is met but Criterion A2 is not met for the past 6 months.

314.01 – Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive

Type:  if Criterion A2 is met but Criterion A1 is not met for the past 6 months.

Coding Note:  For individuals (especially adolescents and adults) who currently have symptoms that no longer meet full criteria, “In Partial Remission” should be specified.

Page last modified March 14, 2014