Undergraduate Economics Courses

ECO 100 Current Economic Issues. Examination of current social issues from an economic perspective, such as drugs, rent control, environmental pollution, poverty, crime, and the distribution of medical care. Recommended for students interested in current issues. Students with any economics course at ECO 200 and above cannot take this course for credit. Fulfills one of the Foundation - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Offered fall and winter semesters. Three credits.

ECO 200 Business Economics. Analysis of business issues including: demand and market pricing strategies, supply and production costs, profit maximization of firms in different markets, monetary and fiscal policy, and business cycles. Cannot be taken for credit, if credit obtained for ECO 210 or ECO 211. Suitable only for students with strong analytical skills. Prerequisites: MTH 110, sophomore standing recommended. Three credits. Offered every semester.

ECO 210 Introductory Macroeconomics. Introduction to the study of the national and global economies. Topics include the effects of government taxation and budget deficits on economic growth; ways to alleviate unemployment, inflation and international trade imbalances; and the importance of expectations and decision-making in an uncertain world. Prerequisites: MTH 110, sophomore standing recommended. Fulfills one of the Foundation - Social and Behavioral Sciences.  Three credits. Offered every semester.

ECO 211 Introductory Microeconomics. Focuses on the interactions among households, producers, and governments in market economies. Applies fundamental methods of economic analysis to topics such as: household spending and saving patterns; producer pricing, profits, and organization; wages and income distribution; investment decisions; health care and insurance; government taxes, spending, and regulation of markets. Prerequisites: MTH 110, sophomore standing recommended. Fulfills one of the Foundation - Social and Behavioral Sciences. Three credits. Offered every semester.

ECO 312 Applied Microeconomics. Applies microeconomic analysis to business, personal, and public decisions. Topics include: business cost and output decisions; consumer demand; pricing and allocation of goods, services, labor, and other resources in competitive markets; strategic pricing across markets; impact of government policies, services, taxes, and regulations on market operations. Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Three credits. Offered every year.

ECO 313 Business Cycles and Growth. Topics include analysis of economic fluctuations and their impact on corporations and consumers; different explanations for business cycles; monetary and fiscal policy for stabilizing economic fluctuations; effects of public debt, investment, employment and trade policy on economic growth. Prerequisites: 210 or 200. Three credits. Offered every year.

ECO 330 Sports Economics. Examination of economic issues pertaining to professional and collegiate sports, including analysis of industrial organization and antitrust issues, labor relations, discrimination, and the impact of franchises on local economics.  Prerequisites: Completion of Foundations/Social Sciences.  Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements.

ECO 341 Economics of Business Strategy. Practical application of microeconomic methods to business decisions. Topics include current issues in consumer demand; business organization, cost decisions, and pricing strategies; decision making under uncertainty and risk management; projections using supply/ demand analysis; information, incentives, and employee compensation; and cost-benefit analysis of investment projects. Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ECO 342 Strategic Games. The basic principles of game theory are analyzed to provide insight into real world problems. Ability to construct simple games from actual situations and derive implications about expected behavior. Developing strategic responses for policy and analysis and in response to competitor moves. Prerequisite: Completion of Mathematical Science Foundation. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Three credits. Offered every winter.

ECO 343 — Health Economics
Application of microeconomic tools to health and medical care issues. Topics include demand for health care, economic choices of medical care providers, insurance markets, economic justification for government involvement in the medical care system, various proposals for health care reform in the U.S. and different health care systems in the world. Part of the Health Issue. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ECO 345 Environmental and Resource Economics. Develops a systematic economic framework to analyze market and government allocations of natural and environmental resources.  Topics include relationships between population growth, land development, and environmental quality; regulatory versus market oriented environmental policies; supplies and prices of mineral and energy resources; harvest and protection of forests and sheries.  Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Part of the Sustainability Issue. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ECO 349 Emerging Markets Issues. Important problems in emerging markets throughout the world, such as: policies to stimulate growth via international trade; foreign aid and multinational investment in transitional economics; the use of natural resources and agriculture in economic development; and the relationship of economic development to education, health and migration.  Prerequisites: 210 or 200. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives requirement. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ECO 350 Gender and Economics. Analysis of gender differences in employment and earnings. Topics include allocation of time between the household and the labor market, employment and family structure, theories of discrimination, antipoverty programs, comparable worth, parental leave, and affirmative action. Historical trends and cross-cultural comparisons are discussed along with current U.S. conditions. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Three credits.

ECO 355 Business, Antitrust, and Regulation. In light of the structure, conduct, and performance of American private enterprise as revealed by empirical evidence, this course discusses the intent and actual effects of antitrust policy, regulation, and deregulation. Included will be studies of specific industries. Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Three credits. Offered once a year.

ECO 360 Employment, Wages, and Productivity. The study of labor market issues using economic analysis. Topics include composition of the labor force, productivity improvements, effects of international trade and migration on wages and employment. Policy issues include minimum wages, welfare programs, OSHA, education and training, and discrimination. Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ECO 365 Comparative Economic Systems. Relative to such economic goals as economic freedom, full employment, growth, efficiency, consumer welfare, equitable distribution of income and security, and how well alternative economic systems perform? This course studies contemporary, evolving capitalist, socialist, and mixed systems in different countries. Prerequisites: 210 or 200. Part of the Globalization Issue. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ECO 369 International Economic Issues. International Economic Issues. Selected topics in both international trade and international finance. Includes preferential trading arrangements such as NAFTA and the European Union; analysis of barriers to trade and arguments for and against protectionism; the influence of exchange rates on capital flows; and the relationship between international trade and economic growth. Prerequisites: 210 or 200. Fulfills Cultures - World Perspectives and fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Part of Global Change theme. Three credits. Offered every year.

ECO 380 Special Topics in Economics. Studies of selected authors, concepts, movements, periods, theories or countries. Topics and prerequisites will be listed in the class schedule. One to three credits.

ECO 414 Money and Banking. Contemporary issues related to the role of money in a modern economy, regulation and performance of banks, Federal Reserve Bank's policy to control economic fluctuations and promote growth. Prerequisites: 210 or 200. Three credits. Offered every year.

ECO 435 Urban Economics. Topics include the urbanization process, the city as an economic system, location analysis, poverty, housing, pollution, transportation, and public finance. Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Three credits. Offered fall semester.

ECO 436 Real Estate Economics. Develops an economic framework for understanding urban real estate markets. Topics include: the determinants of land prices and urban spatial structure, the characteristics of the urban housing market, factors that influence business locations, characteristics of commercial real estate markets, and the response of real estate markets to business cycles. Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Fulfills one of the Issues/Themes requirements. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ECO 440 Public Finance. The justification for the provision of some goods and services by government, analysis of government decision-making, the design of fair and efficient taxation, and the relationships among federal, state, and local government. Prerequisites: 211 or 200. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ECO 480 Econometrics and Forecasting. Gives students a working knowledge of sources of economic and business data, empirical model building, and economic interpretation of statistical results. Topics include regression analysis, designing models, forecasting and hypothesis testing. Emphasis on business and policy applications. Prerequisites: 200 or 210 or 211, and STA 215. Three credits. Offered every other year.

ECO 490 Economics Internship. This course will be used to grant economics credit to students who complete internships in the economics field. May not be used to fulfill the upper-division cognate requirement for business majors. One to six credits. Prerequisites: Junior standing; minimum 3.0 GPA. Offered on a credit/no credit basis.

ECO 495 Senior Economic Project. (Capstone). Research project in conjunction with a seminar where student projects are discussed with economics faculty and representatives from other social sciences. Faculty research and general perspectives on the nature of economics are also included in seminar discussions. Prerequisites: 312, 313, one of which may be taken concurrently. Three credits. Offered winter semester.

ECO 499 Independent Study and Research. Independent study in an area of interest to the student, supervised by a member of the economics faculty, cumulating in a written and oral report. One to four credits. Offered fall and winter semesters.

For detailed information about Economics visit - The Economics Department Home Page

 

 

Contact Information:
Seidman Undergraduate Student Services
go2gvbiz@gvsu.edu
(616) 331-7500

Page last modified October 22, 2013